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Granlund, Rego
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Baroutsi, N., Berggren, P., Johansson, B. J., Nählinder, S., Granlund, R., Turcotte, I. & Tremblay, S. (2014). Assessing development of team training in emergency management. In: Proceedings of the 11th ISCRAM: . Paper presented at ISCRAM.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing development of team training in emergency management
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2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 11th ISCRAM, 2014Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117703 (URN)
Conference
ISCRAM
Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2015-05-20
Trnka, J., Granlund, H. & Granlund, R. (2008). Using Low-Fidelity Simulations to Support Design of Decision-Support Systems for Command and Control Applications. In: Distributed Multimedia Systems,2008 (pp. 158). Skokie, IL, USA: Knowledge Systems Institute
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Low-Fidelity Simulations to Support Design of Decision-Support Systems for Command and Control Applications
2008 (English)In: Distributed Multimedia Systems,2008, Skokie, IL, USA: Knowledge Systems Institute , 2008, p. 158-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Modern decision-support systems for command and control may lead to radical organizational and technological changes. This paper describes a methodology to support designers and developers of such system in order to identify this type of changes in the design process. The methodology is based on a shorter series of low-fidelity simulations. The analyses do not focus on individual actions of the decision-support system operators, but instead on impacts of the systems on situated and joint actions of the command and control teams in terms of communication and coordination. The simulation series presented in the paper shows how the use of a decision-support system combining real-time data from various sensors led to changes in the content and structure of the communication as well as the resource coordination. Findings from the discussed simulations suggest that more attention should be given to possible impacts of decision-support systems on the joint actions of the command and control teams, as well as how these teams- actions are situated within the larger command and control system. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skokie, IL, USA: Knowledge Systems Institute, 2008
Keywords
Simulation, command and control, microworld, decision-support system, design, communication
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-44830 (URN)77787 (Local ID)77787 (Archive number)77787 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-12
Smith, K., Lindgren, I. & Granlund, R. (2007). Bridging Cultural Barriers to Collaborative Decision Making in On-Site Operations Coordination Centers. Linköping: Division of Industrial Ergonomics, Linköping Institute of Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging Cultural Barriers to Collaborative Decision Making in On-Site Operations Coordination Centers
2007 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report provides both summaries and detailed discussions of the theoretical foundations, methods, and findings of empirical research aimed at identifying barriers to collaborative decision-making in multicultural On-Site Operations Coordination Centers (OSOCC). The research was conducted in 2005 and 2006 at Linköping University and Högskolan i Skövde and was sponsored by the International Department of the Swedish Rescue Services Agency. The experiments were controlled but dynamic laboratory studies of communication, collaboration, and decision making by culturally homogeneous teams of four that were assembled ad-hoc and on-site. The teams- task was to manage and conduct emergency operations within the C3Fire microworld. C3Fire recorded all communication among team members and all the actions they took. Participants individually completed a battery of self-report instruments about their values and beliefs. Results are summarized in a list of 30 dimensions of demographic and cultural diversity that are likely to be found whenever small multinational teams are formed ad-hoc and on-site. The potential impact of these dimensions is explained using the analogy of faultlines. Alignments of dimensions of diversity have the potential to generate friction and split a team into subgroups. Activated faultlines are barriers to communication, collaboration, and decision making. The report concludes with discussions of the implications of group faultlines and dimensions of cultural diversity for the SRSA-s training programs for OSOCC personnel, for the Swedish society, and for the scientific community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Division of Industrial Ergonomics, Linköping Institute of Technology, 2007
Series
LiU-IEI-R ; 2
Keywords
cultural differences, microworlds, emergency management, values, teamwork, group faultlines, experimental psychology
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39986 (URN)51941 (Local ID)51941 (Archive number)51941 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2014-12-19
Lindgren, I., Smith, K. & Granlund, R. (2007). Predicting group faultlines in multicultural C2 operations. In: 12th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium ICCRTS,2007. Newport, RI: ICCRTS
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting group faultlines in multicultural C2 operations
2007 (English)In: 12th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium ICCRTS,2007, Newport, RI: ICCRTS , 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Newport, RI: ICCRTS, 2007
Keywords
Command and control, group faultlines, cultural diversity
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39580 (URN)49886 (Local ID)49886 (Archive number)49886 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2014-12-19
Smith, C. S., Lindgren, I. & Granlund, R. (2006). Empirical studies of cultural barriers to collaborative decision making in international emergency services operations. In: the 18th International Conference of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology,2006 (pp. 54). the International Association for CrossCultural Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Empirical studies of cultural barriers to collaborative decision making in international emergency services operations
2006 (English)In: the 18th International Conference of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology,2006, the International Association for CrossCultural Psychology , 2006, p. 54-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
the International Association for CrossCultural Psychology, 2006
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37012 (URN)33400 (Local ID)33400 (Archive number)33400 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2014-12-19
Lindgren, I., Granlund, R. & Smith, C. S. (2006). Studying cultural aspects of emergency management using the C3Fire microworld. In: SIMsafe2006,2006.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying cultural aspects of emergency management using the C3Fire microworld
2006 (English)In: SIMsafe2006,2006, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Keywords
emergency management, culture, microworlds
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36226 (URN)30586 (Local ID)30586 (Archive number)30586 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2014-12-19
Johansson, B., Granlund, R. & Waern, Y. (2004). How Professionals make Expert Decisions. In: Henry Montgomery, Raanan Lipshitz, Berndt Brehmer (Ed.), How Professionals make Expert Decisions: . Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Professionals make Expert Decisions
2004 (English)In: How Professionals make Expert Decisions / [ed] Henry Montgomery, Raanan Lipshitz, Berndt Brehmer, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004, p. -423Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This volume is the fruit of the 5th conference on Naturalistic Decision Making which focused on the importance of studying people who have some degree of expertise in the domain in which they make decisions. The substantive concerns pertain to how individuals and groups make decisions in professional and organizational settings, and to develop suitable methods for studying these questions rigorously. This volume appeals to practitioners in business and government, as well as academics and students who are interested in naturalistic decision making

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-30880 (URN)16541 (Local ID)0-8058-4470-8 (ISBN)978-0-8058-4471-9 (ISBN)16541 (Archive number)16541 (OAI)
Note

Edited by Berndt Brehmer, Rahnan Lipshitz Henry Montgommery

Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2016-10-06Bibliographically approved
Granlund, R. & Johansson, B. (2004). Monitoring distributed collaboration in the C3Fire microworld. In: Samuel G. Schiflett, Linda R. Elliott, Eduardo Salas, Michael D. Coovert (Ed.), Scaled worlds: Development, Validation, and Applications. Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring distributed collaboration in the C3Fire microworld
2004 (English)In: Scaled worlds: Development, Validation, and Applications / [ed] Samuel G. Schiflett, Linda R. Elliott, Eduardo Salas, Michael D. Coovert, Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited , 2004, p. -363Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This text identifies and discusses emerging challenges and opportunities arising from advanced-technology simulation-based microworld analogues of operational environments. These "scaled worlds" have been used and advocated for many years. A major transformation is expected in research and training using new, more advanced versions of these systems. Technology now affords new capabilities using PC-based systems. Complex and distributed expert decision making and team performance can be elicited and rehearsed through affordable and easily distributed systems. These new systems will transform the nature of research and training on two fronts: (1) the content internal (i.e. laboratory control) and external validity, and (2) who can do the research and/or training, as these new systems offer more opportunities/options. Organizations and universities are rapidly building internet-based systems to train, educate and/or utilize individuals who may be distributed across the globe. Researchers across the globe will also use these new capabilities, forging new and multi-discipline research as new alliances and collaborations are enabled. Research previously restricted to highly realistic and restricted high-fidelity systems will be open to more participants and these new processes and systems will create new opportunities. Such systems will offer more realism, control and feedback to researchers and trainers. Distributed systems can link multiple nodes, allowing many participants to perform within a shared scenario. Scenarios are more easily constructed and controlled. Opportunities using these internet-based systems are clear, as evidenced by high funding and investments in advanced internet-based training systems. Universities, corporations and DoD organizations are rapidly escalating their use of such systems for collaborative research, education, distributed training and distance learning. These simulation-based systems will rapidly change the nature of research, education and training for most performance domains. Low to medium fidelity environments capture knowledge and performance requirements while retaining high levels of experimental control and generalizability. This book goes further than others on simulation-based training and research (which focus on highly realistic systems) by addressing the issues of scale, fidelity and purpose in more abstracted scaled world systems. It brings together experts who use these systems, from a variety of perspectives. Their contributions document emerging trends and issues with regard to development, utilization and validation of these emerging "scaled world" systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2004
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-23802 (URN)3325 (Local ID)978-0-7546-3509-3 (ISBN)0-754-6-3509-0 (ISBN)3325 (Archive number)3325 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, B., Waern, Y. & Granlund, R. (2004). Research on Decision Making and New Technology - Methodological Issues. In: Henry Montgomery, Raanan Lipshitz, Berndt Brehmer (Ed.), How Professionals Make Expert Decisions: . Mahaw, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research on Decision Making and New Technology - Methodological Issues
2004 (English)In: How Professionals Make Expert Decisions / [ed] Henry Montgomery, Raanan Lipshitz, Berndt Brehmer, Mahaw, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates , 2004, p. -423Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This volume is the fruit of the 5th conference on Naturalistic Decision Making which focused on the importance of studying people who have some degree of expertise in the domain in which they make decisions. The substantive concerns pertain to how individuals and groups make decisions in professional and organizational settings, and to develop suitable methods for studying these questions rigorously. This volume appeals to practitioners in business and government, as well as academics and students who are interested in naturalistic decision making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mahaw, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-23801 (URN)3324 (Local ID)0-8058-4470-8 (ISBN)978-0-8058-4471-9 (ISBN)3324 (Archive number)3324 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, B., Persson, M., Granlund, R. & Matsson, P. (2003). C3Fire in Command and Control Research. Cognition, Technology & Work, 5(3), 191-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>C3Fire in Command and Control Research
2003 (English)In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 191-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New and envisioned technological means and abilities for exerting command and control have increased the interest of man-machine research in a military context. Although there are many current proposals for how new command and control systems should be designed, many of the proposed properties that are considered advantageous have never been tested or could even be impossible to test in real-world situations. In spite of that, proposed design solutions are generally held valid in many Western countries where developments of major command and control system projects are in progress. An important question is how microworlds can be used for research on team decision-making. The use of microworlds gives us the possibility to create controlled settings and the opportunity to use advanced monitoring tools to study the subjects. Our studies indicate that the microworld concept, even though the simulation is fairly simple, reflects some of the crucial aspects of team-work in dynamic settings. The article presents results from a study in command and control using the C3Fire microworld (http://www.c3fire.org). Results and methodological issues are discussed.

Keywords
Microworld - Dynamic decision making - Command and control - Simulation - Team decision making
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60938 (URN)10.1007/s10111-003-0127-x (DOI)
Available from: 2010-11-01 Created: 2010-11-01 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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