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Nilsson, Erik
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Leo, J., Filipovic, G., Krementsova, J., Norblad, R., Söderholm, M. & Nilsson, E. (2006). Open cholecystectomy for all patients in the era of laparoscopic surgery - a prospective cohort study. BMC Surgery, 3(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open cholecystectomy for all patients in the era of laparoscopic surgery - a prospective cohort study
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2006 (English)In: BMC Surgery, ISSN 1471-2482, E-ISSN 1471-2482, Vol. 3, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37627 (URN)36805 (Local ID)36805 (Archive number)36805 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Ros, A. & Nilsson, E. (2004). Abdominal pain and patient overall and cosmetic satisfaction one year after cholecystectomy: outcome of a randomized trial comparing laparoscopic and minilaparotomy cholecystectomy. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 39(8), 773-777
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abdominal pain and patient overall and cosmetic satisfaction one year after cholecystectomy: outcome of a randomized trial comparing laparoscopic and minilaparotomy cholecystectomy
2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 773-777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies with long‐term follow‐up after cholecystectomy have shown that residual abdominal symptoms are common. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and minilaparotomy cholecystectomy (MC) can both give a smoother, early postoperative course than conventional open cholecystectomy (OC). The present study concerns abdominal pain and patient overall and cosmetic satisfaction one year after LC and MC.

Methods: In a prospective, single‐blind study, 724 patients were randomly allocated to LC or MC. Patients completed questionnaires including items concerning abdominal pain before and one year after surgery and overall and cosmetic satisfaction one year after surgery.

Results: There was no difference in reduction of abdominal pain between LC and MC patients. For four different aspects of abdominal pain, 31%, 24%, 30% and 16% of patients operated with LC reported residual abdominal pain one year after surgery. The corresponding figures for MC were 28%, 20%, 27% and 18% (P values 0.55, 0.32, 0.55 and 0.63, respectively). According to questionnaire answers, there was no significant difference in the cosmetic result and overall patient satisfaction between LC and MC patients.

Conclusions: There are no differences between laparoscopic and minilaparotomy cholecystectomy in long‐term outcome regarding abdominal pain and patient overall and cosmetic satisfaction. A large proportion of patients have abdominal pain one year after cholecystectomy. Future studies should include preoperative assessment and indications for cholecystectomy.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28282 (URN)10.1080/00365520410005540 (DOI)13389 (Local ID)13389 (Archive number)13389 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Nordin, P., Haapaniemi, S., van der Linden, W. & Nilsson, E. (2004). Choice of anesthesia and risk of reoperation for recurrence in groin hernia repair. Annals of Surgery, 240, 187-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choice of anesthesia and risk of reoperation for recurrence in groin hernia repair
2004 (English)In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 240, p. 187-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28293 (URN)13403 (Local ID)13403 (Archive number)13403 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nilsson, E., Ros, A., Rahmqvist, M., Bäckman, K. & Carlsson, P. (2004). Cholecystectomy: costs and health-related quality of life: a comparison of two techniques. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 16(6), 473-482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cholecystectomy: costs and health-related quality of life: a comparison of two techniques
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2004 (English)In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 473-482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Outcomes of previous health economic evaluations comparing minilaparotomy cholecystectomy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been inconsistent.

Objective. To compare costs for minilaparotomy cholecystectomy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy and to study changes in quality of life induced by these operations.

Design. Single-blind, randomized controlled trial, run from 1 March 1997 to 30 April 1999.

Setting. One university hospital and four non-university hospitals in Sweden.

Main measures. Cost and perceived health estimation according to the global quality of life instrument EuroQol-5D.

Results. Of 1719 cholecystectomy patients at five centres, 724 entered the trial and were treated with minilaparotomy cholecystectomy or laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 362 in each group. Total health care costs were less for minilaparotomy cholecystectomy than for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (median values US$2428 for minilaparotomy cholecystectomy versus US$2613 or US$3006 for laparoscopic cholecystectomy with 100 operations per year and reusable trocars or 50 operations per year and disposable trocars, respectively). There was no significant difference in total costs (including costs due to loss of production) between minilaparotomy cholecystectomy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy with 100 operations per year and reusable trocars in laparoscopic cholecystectomy (US$3731 versus US$3649, respectively). However, in calculations assuming 50 operations per year and disposable trocars in laparoscopic cholecystectomy, this technique was more expensive than minilaparotomy cholecystectomy (US$4042 versus US$3731). Health-related quality of life was slightly but significantly lower for the minilaparotomy cholecystectomy group 1 week after surgery. One month and 1 year postoperatively no difference between the randomized groups was found.

Conclusion. Total costs did not differ between minilaparotomy cholecystectomy and laparoscopic cholecystectomy with high-volume surgery and disposable trocars, whereas laparoscopic cholecystectomy was more expensive with fewer operations and disposable trocars. The gain in health-related quality of life with laparoscopic cholecystectomy compared with minilaparotomy cholecystectomy was small and of limited duration.

Keywords
cholecystectomy, health care costs, quality of life
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-23935 (URN)10.1093/intqhc/mzh077 (DOI)3483 (Local ID)3483 (Archive number)3483 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Bay-Nielsen, M., Nilsson, E., Nordin, P. & Kehlet, H. (2004). Chronic pain after open mesh and sutured repair of indirect inguinal hernia in young males. British Journal of Surgery, 91, 1372-1376
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic pain after open mesh and sutured repair of indirect inguinal hernia in young males
2004 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 91, p. 1372-1376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28283 (URN)13390 (Local ID)13390 (Archive number)13390 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nilsson, E. (2004). Quality registries should be used more, short length of stay is not a sufficient variable. Läkartidningen, 101, 1124-1125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality registries should be used more, short length of stay is not a sufficient variable
2004 (English)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 101, p. 1124-1125Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28286 (URN)13393 (Local ID)13393 (Archive number)13393 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nordin, P., Hernell, H., Unosson, M., Gunnarsson, U. & Nilsson, E. (2004). Type of anaesthesia and patient acceptance in groin hernia repair: a multicentre randomised trial. Hernia, 8(3), 220-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Type of anaesthesia and patient acceptance in groin hernia repair: a multicentre randomised trial
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2004 (English)In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 220-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background  Groin hernia repair can be performed under general (GA), regional (RA), or local (LA) anaesthesia. This multicentre randomised trial evaluates patient acceptance, satisfaction, and quality of life with these three anaesthetic alternatives in hernia surgery.

Methods  One hundred and thirty-eight patients at three hospitals were randomised to one of three groups, GA, RA, or LA. Upon discharge, they were asked to complete a specially designed questionnaire with items focusing on pain, discomfort, recovery, and overall satisfaction with the anaesthetic method used. The global quality-of-life instrument EuroQol was used for estimation of health perceived.

Results  Significantly more patients in the LA group than in the RA group felt pain during surgery (P<0.001). This pain was characterised as light or moderate and for the majority of LA patients was felt during infiltration of the anaesthetic agent. Postoperatively, patients in the LA group first felt pain significantly later than patients in the other two groups (P=0.012) and significantly fewer LA patients consumed analgesics more than three times during the first postoperative day (P=0.002). The results concerning nausea, vomiting, and time to first meal all favour LA. No difference was found among the three groups concerning overall satisfaction and quality of life.

Conclusion   In a general surgical setting, we found LA to be well tolerated and associated with significant advantages compared to GA and RA.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24775 (URN)10.1007/s10029-004-0234-5 (DOI)7036 (Local ID)7036 (Archive number)7036 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Kald, A., Fridsten, S., Nordin, P. & Nilsson, E. (2002). Outcome of repair of bilateral groin hernias: A prospective evaluation of 1487 patients. European Journal of Surgery, 168(3), 150-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome of repair of bilateral groin hernias: A prospective evaluation of 1487 patients
2002 (English)In: European Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1102-4151, E-ISSN 1741-9271, Vol. 168, no 3, p. 150-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To find out whether simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias increases the risk of recurrence compared with unilateral repair. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Swedish hospitals participating in the Swedish Hernia Register (SHR). Interventions: Prospective collection of data from the SHR, 1992-1999 inclusive. The Cox proportional hazard test was used for calculating odds ratio (OR). Main outcome measures: Hernia repairs were followed up in a life table fashion until re-operation for recurrence or death of the patient. Results: 33416 unilateral and 1487 bilateral operations on 2974 groin hernias were found. Direct hernias were more common in the bilateral than in the unilateral group, 1825, 61% compared with 13 336, 40%, (p < 0.0001). A laparoscopic method was used for 1774 (60%) of bilateral and 3285 (10%) unilateral repairs, and 455 bilateral operations (31%) were done as day cases compared with 18 376 (55%) unilateral ones (p < 0.0001 for both comparisons). The cumulative incidence of reoperation at three years for groin hernias after bilateral and unilateral repair was 4.1% (95% confidence interval 3.1% to 5.1%) and 3.4% (95% CI 3.1% to 3.7%, respectively. After adjustment for other risk factors, the OR for reoperation for recurrence after bilateral repair was 1.2 (95% C1 0.9 to 1.5) with unilateral repair as reference. The OR for reoperation after laparoscopic bilateral repair compared with open bilateral repair was 0.9 (95% CI 0.6 to 1.4). Conclusions: Simultaneous repair of bilateral hernias does not increase the risk of reoperation for recurrence and there is no significant difference in the risk of reoperration after bilateral repair using open or laparoscopic techniques.

Keywords
Bilateral, Groin hernia, Laparoscopy, Mesh, Repair
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47146 (URN)10.1080/110241502320127757 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Haapaniemi, S. & Nilsson, E. (2002). Recurrence and pain three years after groin hernia repair: Validation of postal questionnaire and selective physical examination as a method of follow-up. European Journal of Surgery, 168(1), 22-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recurrence and pain three years after groin hernia repair: Validation of postal questionnaire and selective physical examination as a method of follow-up
2002 (English)In: European Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1102-4151, E-ISSN 1741-9271, Vol. 168, no 1, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives:

To evaluate recurrence rate and chronic groin pain three years after hernia repair and to validate a postal questionnaire with selective physical examination as a method of follow-up.

Design:

Prospective cohort study.

Setting:

County hospital, Sweden.

Patients:

Prospective data were retrieved from the Swedish Hernia Register for patients aged 15–80 years at the time of groin hernia repair, operated on during 1994.

Interventions:

Three years after operation patients were mailed a three-item questionnaire and invited to have a physical examination. Those examined answered a detailed questionnaire about pain and functional impairment. When appropriate an extended physical examination was undertaken to find out the probable cause of the pain.

Main outcome measures:

Recurrence, pain, and functional impairment.

Results:

272 hernias were repaired in 264 patients. 24 patients had died and 16 had a recurrence before the follow-up examination. After a median observation time of 44 months, 218 patients with 223 repairs (96%) were examined. Depending on the definition of recurrence and completeness of physical examination (selective or all patients) the recurrence rate varied between 10% (25/239) and 15% (35/239) including recurrences diagnosed before follow-up. 40 patients (18%) reported groin pain at follow-up, which was considered to be caused by a previous hernia repair in 34 (15%), 12 of whom (5%) had moderate or severe pain. Postoperative complications were associated with an increased risk of chronic pain, whereas type of hernia and use of mesh had no influence.

Conclusions:

The incidence of recurrence and chronic pain after hernia repair requires continuous audit in non-specialised units. Participation in a register and follow-up by a three-item questionnaire and selective physical examination provides a solid basis for quality control.

Keywords
Follow-up, Functional impairment, Groin hernia, Pain, Questionnaire, Recurrence
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47036 (URN)10.1080/110241502317307535 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Haapaniemi, S., Gunnarsson, U., Nordin, P. & Nilsson, E. (2001). Reoperation after recurrent groin hernia repair. Annals of Surgery, 234(1), 122-126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reoperation after recurrent groin hernia repair
2001 (English)In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 234, no 1, p. 122-126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To analyze reoperation rates for recurrent and primary groin hernia repair documented in the Swedish Hernia Register from 1996 to 1998, and to study variables associated with increased or decreased relative risks for reoperation after recurrent hernia.

Methods: Data were retrieved for all groin hernia repairs prospectively recorded in the Swedish Hernia register from 1996 to 1998. Actuarial analysis adjusted for patients' death was used for calculating the cumulative incidence of reoperation. Relative risk for reoperation was estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model.

Results: From 1996 to 1998, 17,985 groin hernia operations were recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register, 15% for recurrent hernia and 85% for primary hernia. At 24 months the risk for having had a reoperation was 4.6% after recurrent hernia repair and 1.7% after primary hernia repair. The relative risk for reoperation was significantly lower for laparoscopic methods and for anterior tension-free repair than for other techniques. Postoperative complications and direct hernia were associated with an increased relative risk for reoperation. Day-case surgery and local infiltration anesthesia were used less frequently for recurrent hernia than for primary hernia.

Conclusions: Recurrent groin hernia still constitutes a significant quantitative problem for the surgical community. This study supports the use of mesh by laparoscopy or anterior tension-free repair for recurrent hernia operations.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47312 (URN)10.1097/00000658-200107000-00018 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
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