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Collste, Göran
Publications (10 of 105) Show all publications
Collste, G. (2016). Book review: Janusz Salamon (ed). Solidarity Beyond Borders: Ethics in a Globalising World [Review]. Ethical Perspectives, 23(2), 366-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book review: Janusz Salamon (ed). Solidarity Beyond Borders: Ethics in a Globalising World
2016 (English)In: Ethical Perspectives, ISSN 1370-0049, E-ISSN 1783-1431, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 366-368Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Peeters Publishers, 2016
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131009 (URN)000381845000015 ()
Available from: 2016-09-05 Created: 2016-09-05 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Collste, G. (Ed.). (2016). Ethics and Communication: global Perspectives (1ed.). London & New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethics and Communication: global Perspectives
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

How can ethics be communicated in an age of globalisation? Is it possible to overcome cultural differences and agree on common values and principles that cross cultural borders? How does globalisation challenge ethics and established moral traditions? How are human rights justified in a global context?

This timely collection of essays responds directly to these questions. An international team of contributors pursue issues in ethics, information and communication that include both the classical question of the universality/contextuality of ethics and values, but also new challenges for communication relating to how values and norms are communicated and shared across cultural and political borders. The essays in this book explore theoretical questions of global ethics and ethical universalism, ethics and communication with reference to specific world views and religions, and the challenge of globalisation for ethical communication in particular social arenas

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016. p. 225 Edition: 1
Keywords
Etik, Kommunikation
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130109 (URN)9781783485970 (ISBN)9781783485987 (ISBN)9781783485994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-07-10 Created: 2016-07-10 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Collste, G. (2016). Global justice and globalisation. In: Christoph Stückelberger, Walter Fust, Obiora Ike (Ed.), Global ethics for leadership: values and virtues for life (pp. 81-102). Geneve: Globethics.Net
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global justice and globalisation
2016 (English)In: Global ethics for leadership: values and virtues for life / [ed] Christoph Stückelberger, Walter Fust, Obiora Ike, Geneve: Globethics.Net , 2016, p. 81-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Globalisation involves both promising potentials and risks. It has the potential – through the spread of human rights, the migration of people and ideas, and the integration of diverse economies - to improve human wellbeing and enhance the protection of human rights worldwide. But globalisation also incurs risks: global environmental risks (such as global warming), the creation of new centres of power with limited legitimacy, a 'race to the bottom' regarding workers' safety and rights, risky journeys of thousands of migrants and not least growing global inequalities. Globalisation, therefore, is a key factor for today's discussions of justice.

As globalisation connects people, it also raises associated responsibilities between them. Until recently, the interest in justice among political philosophers and social ethicists was mainly focused on the nation state. However, this is no longer feasible. Since economic globalisation affects how wealth and power are distributed globally it has become indispensable to discuss social ethics in a global context and to develop principles of global justice. Global justice, therefore, entails an assessment of the benefits and burdens of the structural relations and institutional arrangements that constitute and govern globalisation

The academic discussion of global justice is vibrant and expanding. In my introduction I provide an overview of the discussions on global poverty, justice, cosmopolitanism and statism, migration, the capability approach and different dimensions of global justice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geneve: Globethics.Net, 2016
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129238 (URN)9782889311231 (ISBN)9782889311224 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-06-14 Created: 2016-06-14 Last updated: 2016-11-29Bibliographically approved
Collste, G. (2016). Globaliation and Global Justice: A Thematic Introduction. De Ethica, 3(1), 5-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Globaliation and Global Justice: A Thematic Introduction
2016 (English)In: De Ethica, ISSN 1854-3405, E-ISSN 2001-8819, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 5-17Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Globalisation involves both promising potentials and risks. It has the potential – through the spread of human rights, the migration of people and ideas, and the integration of diverse economies – to improve human wellbeing and enhance the protection of human rights worldwide. But globalisation also incurs risks: global environmental risks (such as global warming), the creation of new centres of power with limited legitimacy, a ‘race to the bottom’ regarding workers’ safety and rights, risky journeys of thousands of migrants and not least growing global inequalities. Globalisation, therefore, is a key factor for today’s discussions of justice.

As globalisation connects people, it also raises associated responsibilities between them. Until recently, the interest in justice among political philosophers and social ethicists was mainly focused on the nation state. However, this is no longer feasible. Since economic globalisation affects how wealth and power are distributed globally it has become indispensable to discuss social ethics in a global context and to develop principles of global justice. Global justice, therefore, entails an assessment of the benefits and burdens of the structural relations and institutional arrangements that constitute and govern globalisation.

The academic discussion of global justice is vibrant and expanding. In my introduction I provide an overview of the discussions on global poverty, justice, cosmopolitanism and statism, migration, the capability approach and different dimensions of global justice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128228 (URN)10.3384/de-ethica.2001-8819.16315 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Collste, G. (2016). Introduction: Ethics and Communication - Global Perspectives (1ed.). In: Göran Collste (Ed.), Ethics and Communication: Global Perspectives (pp. 1-21). London & New York: Rowman & Littlefield International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Ethics and Communication - Global Perspectives
2016 (English)In: Ethics and Communication: Global Perspectives / [ed] Göran Collste, London & New York: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2016, 1, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London & New York: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2016 Edition: 1
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130110 (URN)978-1-7834-8597-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-07-10 Created: 2016-07-10 Last updated: 2018-07-18
Collste, G. (2016). Rectification for Atrocities under Colonialism. Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 18(6), 852-864
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rectification for Atrocities under Colonialism
2016 (English)In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 852-864Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wars and injustices can have wide-ranging reverberations. Colonialism ended – with a few exceptions – over fifty years ago, but there are still many traces left. In this essay I focus on two cases of atrocities under colonialism that have left scars in the present and my question is: how can a nation rectify for the long-term effects of an aggression? What is the appropriate ethical response? The two examples are the German genocide of the Herero tribe in 1904–1905 and the British war against the Mau Mau movement in Kenya in the 1950s. The examples are chosen because they both illustrate enduring claims for rectification after aggressions. After the presentation of these cases and of how Germany and Great Britain have responded, I discuss the meaning of rectificatory justice and criteria for reasonable claims for rectification.

National Category
Ethics History General Literature Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129236 (URN)10.1080/1369801X.2016.1191959 (DOI)000383353600009 ()
Available from: 2016-06-14 Created: 2016-06-14 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Collste, G. (2015). Global Rectificatory Justice (1ed.). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Rectificatory Justice
2015 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent events have proved that colonialism has left indelible prints in history. In 2013, the British Foreign Secretary apologized and promised compensation for the atrocities in Kenyan detention camps in the 1950s and the same year the heads of governments of the Caribbean Community issued a declaration demanding reparation for the genocide of indigenous populations and for slavery and the slave trade during colonialism The discussion and literature on global justice has mainly focused on distributive justice. What are the implications of colonialism for a theory of global justice today? What does rectificatory justice mean in the light of colonialism? What does global rectificatory justice require in practice? In seeking to answer these questions, the author fills a significant gap in the literature on global justice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. p. 207 Edition: 1
Series
Global Ethics Series
Keywords
global justice, rectificatory justice, colonialism, historical justice
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118787 (URN)978-0-230-01958-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-06-04 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2015-06-18Bibliographically approved
Collste, G. (2015). Principles and approaches in ethics assessment: Research integrity.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Principles and approaches in ethics assessment: Research integrity
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Scientific research is a conscious and systematic approach to acquire knowledge, based on theories, methods and standards that have been developed through the history of scientific disciplines. The terms “research integrity” and “good research practice” refer to ideals for how research ought to be performed.

In the 1940s the American sociologist Robert Merton proposed norms for scientific research that have influenced the discussion on research integrity since then. According to Merton good research should not be secret or anyone’s property but requires instead openness and publicity. Merton uses the term communism/communalism for this norm. The second norm, according to Merton, is universalism, which means that the only relevant criteria for assessing research are the scientific criteria. The position or characteristic of the researcher has no relevance. Thirdly, disinterestedness means that the main motive driving the researcher should be the quest for knowledge, not for example economic gain or fame. Finally, the researcher should always be open for questioning the result. Merton calls this “organized scepticism”. This norm coheres with Karl Popper’s famous demarcation line between research and other activities; falsification, i.e. the constant efforts to falsify one’s result in order to get closer to the truth. Merton’s norms for research are summarized in the acronym CUDOS. Although the exact meaning and implication of Merton’s criteria can be discussed, they imply an ideal for scientific work and deviations from this ideal can be seen as misconduct in research.

Merton’s CUDOS norms are well - known examples of ideals and norms for science. These norms could be seen as the basis for professional ethics of researchers. Scientific misconduct and fraud are deviation from the ideals of science and good research practice. In the following we first conceptualise the area of scientific misconduct. Then we present some norms, guidelines and codes of scientific integrity. In the next section we

argue that scientific misconduct is a real problem that must be taken seriously by the research community and finally we discuss how scientific misconduct is investigated, how common it is and how it can be explained.

 

Publisher
p. 10
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120988 (URN)
Projects
Satori (SATORI (Stakeholders Acting Together On the ethical impact assessment of Research and Innovation),
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7/2007-2013
Note

Annex 1.b Ethical Assessment of Research and Innovation: A Comparative Analysis of Practices and Institutions in the EU and selected other countries Deliverable 1.1.

This deliverable and the work described in it is part of the projectStakeholders Acting Together on the Ethical Impact Assessment of Research and Innovation -SATORI-which received funding from the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 612231.

Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-09-01 Last updated: 2015-09-18Bibliographically approved
Collste, G. (Ed.). (2015). Societas Ethica’s Annual Conference 2015: Globalisation and Global Justice, Lunnevads folkhögskola, Linköping, Sweden, August 20-23, 2015: Societas Ethica Jahretagung 2015, Globalisierung und globale Gerechtigkeit. Paper presented at Societas Ethica’s Annual Conference 2015: Globalisation and Global Justice, August 20-23, Linköping, Sweden. Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Societas Ethica’s Annual Conference 2015: Globalisation and Global Justice, Lunnevads folkhögskola, Linköping, Sweden, August 20-23, 2015: Societas Ethica Jahretagung 2015, Globalisierung und globale Gerechtigkeit
2015 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The proceedings from the Societas Ethica’s annual conference 2015 looks different than previous years. We do not publish the full papers this year. The reason for this change is that less and less papers have been submitted the last years due to the fact that most academic journals are hesitant to publish articles that already have been published in conference proceedings. So, in order to be able to mirror the conferences, the board of Societas Ethica decided that it is better that the conference proceedings contain the paper abstracts.

The proceedings contain three parts; first, the thematic introduction by the President, then the key note speeches and the responses to the key notes and finally, the conference paper abstracts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. p. 162
Series
Linköping University Electronic Press Workshop and Conference Collection ; 6
Keywords
global justice, globalisation
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122890 (URN)
Conference
Societas Ethica’s Annual Conference 2015: Globalisation and Global Justice, August 20-23, Linköping, Sweden
Available from: 2015-11-27 Created: 2015-11-27 Last updated: 2016-11-10Bibliographically approved
Collste, G. (2014). Colonialism, Epistemic Injustice and Global Justice: A response to ‘Overcoming the Epistemic Injustice of Colonialism’ Rajeev Bhargava*. Global Policy, 5(3), 386-387
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colonialism, Epistemic Injustice and Global Justice: A response to ‘Overcoming the Epistemic Injustice of Colonialism’ Rajeev Bhargava*
2014 (English)In: Global Policy, ISSN 1758-5880, E-ISSN 1758-5899, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 386-387Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Durham: John Wiley & Sons, 2014
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-107665 (URN)10.1111/1758-5899.12128 (DOI)000342802300016 ()
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05
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