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Serup, Jörgen
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Ulff, E., Maroti, M., Serup, J. & Falkmer, U. (2013). A potent steroid cream is superior to emollients in reducing acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. A randomised study of betamethasone versus two moisturizing creams. Radiotherapy and Oncology, 108(2), 287-292
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A potent steroid cream is superior to emollients in reducing acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. A randomised study of betamethasone versus two moisturizing creams
2013 (English)In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 108, no 2, p. 287-292Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose: The aim was to investigate whether treatment with potent local steroids can reduce signs and symptoms of acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) compared to emollient creams. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterial and methods: The study was randomised and double-blinded. Patients with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery were included when they started adjuvant 3D planned RT. In all, 104 patients were randomised 2:1:1 to three treatment groups, i.e. betamethasone + Essex (R) cream, Essex (R) cream or Canoderm (R) cream. The patients themselves treated the irradiated area during the radiation period (5 weeks) and two weeks after cessation of RT. Signs of RT dermatitis were measured qualitatively with RTOG clinical scoring and quantitatively by colorimeter. In addition, the patients symptoms were recorded as well as the Fitzpatrick skin type. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.05) in skin reactions when assessed with RTOG in favour of the group treated with the potent steroid. Patient-related symptoms did not differ between the treatment groups. The effect of the steroid was prominent in three subgroups, i.e. (i) patients treated with ablation of the breast, (ii) patients receiving RT to the armpit and the supraclavicular fossa, and (iii) patients with Fitzpatrick skin type 1. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Treatment with betamethasone cream is more efficient than moisturizers for the control of acute RT dermatitis in patients treated with adjuvant RT for breast cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keyword
Radiation dermatitis, Corticosteroids, Breast cancer, Adjuvant radiotherapy, Fitzpatrick skin type
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101393 (URN)10.1016/j.radonc.2013.05.033 (DOI)000326139300019 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Futurum Jonkoping County Hospital for Research and Development in Sweden|106221|

Available from: 2013-11-22 Created: 2013-11-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Ulff, E., Maroti, M. & Serup, J. (2013). Fluorescent cream used as an educational intervention to improve the effectiveness of self-application by patients with atopic dermatitis. Journal of dermatological treatment (Print), 24(4), 268-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fluorescent cream used as an educational intervention to improve the effectiveness of self-application by patients with atopic dermatitis
2013 (English)In: Journal of dermatological treatment (Print), ISSN 0954-6634, E-ISSN 1471-1753, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 268-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess if a fluorescent cream, in a self-application educational session, could increase the effectiveness of cream application in practice and serve as a therapeutic intervention. Methods: 30 adults with atopic dermatitis were enrolled. They applied a fluorescent test cream on two occasions. Effectiveness of application was checked under ultraviolet illumination. At baseline, the patients greased their skin as they normally do. After 2 weeks, the patients were instructed to grease the whole body area. The results were commented on and visualised to the patients on both occasions. Results: At the baseline visit, 29% of the target skin was untreated, and at the follow-up visit after education, this improved to 13.6% (mean values, p andlt; 0.05). Women performed better than men at baseline; however, men performed similar to women at the follow-up visit. Conclusions: The Fluorescent-cream Educational Session (FES) is an educational instrument for therapeutic intervention based on interaction between patient and provider. It includes hard endpoints, that is, visualisation and measurement of treated area, time spend on treatment and amount of cream used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2013
Keyword
compliance, skin disease, treatment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95941 (URN)10.3109/09546634.2011.649243 (DOI)000321585500006 ()
Available from: 2013-08-19 Created: 2013-08-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Carlsen, K. H., Carlsen, K. M. & Serup, J. (2011). Non-attendance rate in a Danish University Clinic of Dermatology. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 25(11), 1269-1274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-attendance rate in a Danish University Clinic of Dermatology
2011 (English)In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 1269-1274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To clarify the rate of non-attendance (NA) in an out-patient clinic. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Attendance lists of 3592 patients were collected daily from 21 July-21 August and 21 October-21 November, 2009. NA patients were contacted to determine extenuations. To study NA in relation to diagnosis and age, a control group of patients who attended before or after a NA was established. Furthermore, two time periods from 8:00-11:30 AM and 11:30 AM-3:00 PM were compared. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In total, 13% NA gave no cancellation (54.2% females and 45.8% males). Divided into age groups, 496 patients 0-25 years old had appointments, but 87 (18.6%) showed NA. In the 26-65 years old, 2188 patients were planned, but 313 (14.1%) showed NA. Over 65 years old, 878 patients were planned, but 69 patients (7.9%) showed NA. NA was higher (P andlt; 0.05) in patients 0-25 years old in comparison with the other age groups. Diagnoses had no influence on the rate of NA (P andgt; 0.05), neither had seasons nor time of the day. The main explanations reported by the NA were: forgetfulness (34.3%), erroneous scheduling (27.7%) and various reasons (38.0%). However, 18.5% had shown NA before while 17.1% were NA first timers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion The NA rate 13% of 3592 patients was mostly patient-related. Erroneous scheduling was estimated to be 3.6%. NA was more frequent among young patients. NA rate is small in comparison with non-adherence to medicines, however, of major practical and economic consequence for the health system. SMS or e-mail notification and improved scheduling are potential actions to improve NA in the routine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
Keyword
adherence, attendance, compliance, dermatology, patient visit
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-72254 (URN)10.1111/j.1468-3083.2010.03962.x (DOI)000296463900004 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|secretarial staff of the Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital||Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Suihko, C. & Serup, J. (2008). Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants. Skin research and technology, 14(4), 498-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants
2008 (English)In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 498-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Fibre-optic fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel non-invasive technique for in vivo imaging of skin. The cellular structure of the epidermis can be studied. A fluorophore, e.g. fluorescein sodium, is introduced by an intradermal injection or applied to the skin surface before scanning. Images are horizontal optical sections parallel to the skin surface. Fluorescence CLSM has hitherto not been applied to experimental contact dermatitis. Objective: The aim was to study the applicability of fluorescence CLSM for in situ imaging of irritant contact dermatitis reactions caused by established model irritants, e.g. sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and pelargonic acid (PA). Methods: Twelve healthy individuals volunteered. The flexor aspect of the right and the left forearm was exposed to SLS in water and PA in isopropanol and occluded under Finn Chambers for 24h. The reactions were rated clinically and, following epicutaneous and intra-dermal application of fluorescein sodium, studied by fluorescence CLSM, magnification ×1000. Results: Both irritants disturbed the epidermal intercellular borders, which became blurred, thickened and variably altered. This was interpreted as being a result of chemical damage to cellular membranes. Cell borders might show a double contour as a result of inter-cellular oedema. PA might increase the size of individual keratinocytes interpreted as a result of intra-cellular disturbance with oedema. SLS-exposed sites showed clusters of keratinocytes with visible nuclei in the outer layers of the epidermis, e.g. a parakeratotic shift supposed to be due to increased cell proliferation elicited by SLS. The isopropanol vehicle and PA did not interfere with the CLSM imaging technique or the experimental procedures. SLS, being a detergent, however, modified the physico-chemical properties of the skin surface and both disturbed epicutaneous labelling with the flurophore and immersion oil coupling between the skin surface and the optical system. Thus, SLS was technically more difficult to study by CLSM than PA. Conclusions: This preliminary study demonstrated the applicability of fluorescence CLSM for a detailed study of experimental skin irritants in vivo. Essential findings were disturbed and widened cell borders, swelling of keratinocytes by PA and induction of a parakeratotic shift by SLS with clusters of keratinocytes holding nuclei in the epidermis. Fluorescence CLSM offers a unique opportunity to study the inter- and intracellular water compartments directly in the epidermis in situ and an opportunity to visualize cell proliferation manifested as parakeratosis. Fibre-optic fluorescence CLSM of irritant reactions is, however, technically more complicated than reflectance CLSM and may not be applicable to any irritant. SLS applied epicutaneously interacted with the skin surface and coupling to the microscope and was thus found to be more difficult to study technically than PA. PA dissolved in isopropanol is for technical reasons, and with SLS as alternative, considered the preferred model irritant. © Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-44959 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0846.2008.00323.x (DOI)78451 (Local ID)78451 (Archive number)78451 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Ivens, U., Serup, J. & O'goshi, K. (2007). Allergy patch test reading from photographic images: Disagreement on ICDRG grading but agreement on simplified tripartite reading. Skin research and technology, 13(1), 110-113
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allergy patch test reading from photographic images: Disagreement on ICDRG grading but agreement on simplified tripartite reading
2007 (English)In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 110-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/aims: The International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG) system for clinical scoring of allergic patch test reactions is well established in clinical dermatology for detailed scoring of allergic reactions. The degree of redness and the presence of swelling, papules, vesicles and bullae are assessed based on visual examination and palpation of reactions. In photographic assessment used in research and tele-dermatology, the scoring is solely based on visual examination of photos. The aim of the study was to evaluate inter-expert variation in patch test reading using photographic images, with ICDRG reading as a reference. Material and methods: Five experienced senior dermatologists each scored 55 positive patch test reactions from 16 slides in an office environment. The slides showed pictures of patch tests with different allergens. The scoring system by ICDRG with six categories for scoring was used. Results: The five dermatologists performed the scoring very differently. When the scoring system was simplified to a tripartite scoring system, the scoring was performed almost similarly by the five clinicians. Conclusion: Based on the present results, it is proposed that the number of scoring categories should be minimized and simplified into negative (including doubtful) reactions, positive reactions and irritant reactions. Such simplified tripartite reading is proposed for research purposes and for tele-dermatology, when scoring is based on photographic images. © Blackwell Munksgaard 2007.

Keyword
?, Association, Contact dermatitis, Imaging, Photography, Reproducibility, Tele-dermatology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50008 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0846.2007.00232.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Loden, M., Ungerth, L. & Serup, J. (2007). Changes in European legislation make it timely to introduce a transparent market surveillance system for cosmetics. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 87(6), 485-492
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in European legislation make it timely to introduce a transparent market surveillance system for cosmetics
2007 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 87, no 6, p. 485-492Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

Marketing of cosmetics often makes strong claims linked to active ingredients. This is especially so for anti-ageing products, where the presentation and content of "active" ingredients may create new difficulties in their classification as cosmetics or medicinal products. A recent change in European legislation classifies a product as medicinal by virtue of its "function", in addition to the previous definition of "presentation" (i.e. marketing linked to diseases). Thus, formulations that also restore, correct or modify physiological functions by exerting a pharmacological, immunological or metabolic action should henceforth be covered by the Medicinal Products Directive. A cosmetic product must be suitable for its purpose and should not lead to adverse reactions that are disproportional in relation to its intended effect. However, the forthcoming ban on animal testing of cosmetic ingredients and the new European regulation, REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals), which aims to ensure a high level of chemical safety to protect human health and the environment, will probably have limited impact on the safety assessment of cosmetics. In order to enable consumers to make informed purchasing decisions, greater transparency in the process of assessing the performance of cosmetics is needed. Introduction of a more transparent system, enabling consumers and professionals to examine the scientific evidence for the claimed effect and the safety assessment of cosmetics, is therefore timely. Lack of transparency increases the risk of consumers wasting money on cosmetics that do not deliver the desired effects. This may jeopardize public trust in the cosmetic industry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for the Publication of Acta Dermato - Venereologica, 2007
Keyword
Claim substantiation, Efficacy, Misleading, Pharmaceuticals, Safety
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47544 (URN)10.2340/00015555-0311 (DOI)000251213300003 ()17989885 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-38849174557 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Ring, L., Kettis-Lindblad, A., Kjellgren, K., Kindell, Y., Maroti, M. & Serup, J. (2007). Living with skin diseases and topical treatment: patients' and providers' perspectives and priorities. Journal of dermatological treatment (Print), 18(4), 209-218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living with skin diseases and topical treatment: patients' and providers' perspectives and priorities
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Journal of dermatological treatment (Print), ISSN 0954-6634, E-ISSN 1471-1753, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:

Relationship-centred care stresses the importance of taking both patients' and health-care providers' values, expectations and preferences into account to improve health outcomes. The aim of this qualitative study was to identify patients' and providers' views and experiences of skin disease and topical treatment.

METHODS:

Two types of focus group were used: (i) patients with chronic dermatological diseases and (ii) doctors, nurses and pharmacists working in dermatological care.

RESULTS:

Three major categories emerged: (i) problems related to the disease, (ii) problems related to the treatment and (iii) strategies for improving everyday life for patients.

CONCLUSION:

Patients and providers made several suggestions for improving everyday life. Future research needs to focus on how to achieve preference-matched shared decision-making, or concordance, between patients and health-care providers, taking different perspectives into account and how to evaluate the effect of the final, clinical, economical and humanistic outcomes of care and treatment. More seamless care and an increasingly shared understanding between patients and providers of their values, expectations and preferences for care and treatment may contribute to better health and better daily lives for patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2007
Keyword
Atopic eczema, Dermatology, Everyday life, Focus groups, Psoriasis, Topical treatment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48922 (URN)10.1080/09546630701278224 (DOI)17671881 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Ulff, E., Maroti, M., Kettis-Lindblad, A., Kjellgren, K., Ahlner, J., Ring, L. & Serup, J. (2007). Single application of a fluorescent test cream by healthy volunteers: assessment of treated and neglected body sites. British Journal of Dermatology, 156(5), 974-978
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single application of a fluorescent test cream by healthy volunteers: assessment of treated and neglected body sites
Show others...
2007 (English)In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 156, no 5, p. 974-978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Management of dermatological self-treatment is demanding. Imperfect application of creams and ointments and poor adherence to topical treatment are common, resulting in unsatisfactory treatment outcome. Objectives: To assess the technique and precision of test subjects' self-application of a test cream. Treated and neglected skin sites were measured after intended widespread single application of a fluorescent test cream. Methods: Twenty healthy volunteers (10 women, 10 men) were included. They were asked to treat their whole skin surface with the fluorescent test cream, except the head and neck and skin covered by underwear. Treated and untreated sites were subsequently measured under Wood's ultraviolet radiation. Results: Thirty-one per cent of the skin surface that was a target for application did not show any fluorescence and thus was assumed to have been untreated. Typical neglected sites included the central back, the upper breast, the axilla with surrounding skin, the legs and the feet, particularly the sole. The posterior aspect of both trunk and extremities, not easily inspected, was more often neglected. In the treated sites the fluorescence was typically uneven. Conclusions: Qualified and motivated persons with no obvious physical limitations practised imperfect self-application of a test cream mimicking a therapeutic cream product. As much as 31% of the skin surface was neglected. Sites especially prone to nonapplication were identified. This might imply that dermatological patients on long-term self-treatment may practise local application very poorly, a problem of major therapeutic and economic importance. A fluorescent test cream can be used for research, and as an educational tool in the training of dermatological patients on how to apply local treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2007
Keyword
Adherence, Application, Compliance, Cream, Fluorescence, Ointment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49911 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2133.2007.07754.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Gniadecki, R., Gniadecka, M. & Serup, J. (2006). Examination of periodic fluctuations in cutaneous blood flow (2ed.). In: Gregor B.E. Jemec ,Gary L. Grove and Jorgen Serup (Ed.), Handbook of non-invasive methods and the skin, second edition: (pp. 697-707). Boca Raton, Florida: Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examination of periodic fluctuations in cutaneous blood flow
2006 (English)In: Handbook of non-invasive methods and the skin, second edition / [ed] Gregor B.E. Jemec ,Gary L. Grove and Jorgen Serup, Boca Raton, Florida: Taylor & Francis , 2006, 2, p. 697-707Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Firmly established as the leading international reference in this field, Non-Invasive Methods and the Skin broke new ground with its comprehensive coverage of methods used in both clinical and experimental dermatology. Completely revised and updated, containing more than twice as much information, the Second Edition continues the tradition. The authors' thorough research and clear organization make this book a baseline reference for those using noninvasive biophysical methods to study the skin.  Arranged by physical modality and structured to provide educational and practical information, the second edition, like its predecessor, will prove to be of value to young researchers and senior scientists alike. The coverage of major evaluation and measurement methods share a consistent format, including scope, sources of error, application, and validity. This edition incorporates 69 revised chapters with more than 90 new chapters covering topics such as computer technique, imaging techniques, skin friction, barrier functions, and more.New chapters provide coverage of: computers, computer techniques, and image analysis imaging techniques, including clinical photography legal situations and guidelines behind instrumental use skin friction barrier functions important new techniques such as in vitro confocal microscopy, OCT, and Raman spectroscopy veterinary/animal research use of methods  The truly interdisciplinary, international panel of contributors includes experts from the specialties of dermatology, bioengineering, pathology, manufacturing engineering, medical physics, pharmacology, microbiology, neurology, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, cardiovascular research, and pharmacy from academic institutions and hospitals in countries such as Denmark, Germany, the United Kingdom, the United States, Japan, Israel, Taiwan, and Singapore. The revision is extensive and covers a broad spectrum of methods while providing the same caliber of authoritative information that made the previous edition so popular. Application oriented, practical, and instructive, this Second Edition will meet the needs of the researchers today, and in years to come.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boca Raton, Florida: Taylor & Francis, 2006 Edition: 2
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37717 (URN)37826 (Local ID)0-8493-1437-2 (ISBN)978-0-8493-1437-7 (ISBN)37826 (Archive number)37826 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2013-09-19Bibliographically approved
Serup, J., Jemec, G. B. & Grove, G. L. (Eds.). (2006). Handbook of non-invasive methods and the skin, second edition (2ed.). Boca Raton, Florida: Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Handbook of non-invasive methods and the skin, second edition
2006 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Firmly established as the leading international reference in this field, Non-Invasive Methods and the Skin broke new ground with its comprehensive coverage of methods used in both clinical and experimental dermatology. Completely revised and updated, containing more than twice as much information, the Second Edition continues the tradition. The authors' thorough research and clear organization make this book a baseline reference for those using noninvasive biophysical methods to study the skin.

Arranged by physical modality and structured to provide educational and practical information, the second edition, like its predecessor, will prove to be of value to young researchers and senior scientists alike. The coverage of major evaluation and measurement methods share a consistent format, including scope, sources of error, application, and validity. This edition incorporates 69 revised chapters with more than 90 new chapters covering topics such as computer technique, imaging techniques, skin friction, barrier functions, and more.New chapters provide coverage of:

  • computers, computer techniques, and image analysis
  • imaging techniques, including clinical photography- legal situations and guidelines behind instrumental use- skin friction
  • barrier functions- important new techniques such as in vitro confocal microscopy, OCT, and Raman spectroscopy
  • veterinary/animal research use of methods

The truly interdisciplinary, international panel of contributors includes experts from the specialties of dermatology, bioengineering, pathology, manufacturing engineering, medical physics, pharmacology, microbiology, neurology, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, cardiovascular research, and pharmacy from academic institutions and hospitals in countries such as Denmark, Germany, the United Kingdom, the United States, Japan, Israel, Taiwan, and Singapore. The revision is extensive and covers a broad spectrum of methods while providing the same caliber of authoritative information that made the previous edition so popular. Application oriented, practical, and instructive, this Second Edition will meet the needs of the researchers today, and in years to come.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boca Raton, Florida: Taylor & Francis, 2006. p. 1056 Edition: 2
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36991 (URN)33265 (Local ID)0-8493-1437-2 (ISBN)978-0-8493-1437-7 (ISBN)33265 (Archive number)33265 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2013-09-20Bibliographically approved
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