liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Borén, Hans
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Aalberg, L., Andersson, K., Bertler, C., Borén, H., Cole, M. D., Dahlén, J., . . . Sippola, E. (2005). Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: I. Synthesis of standards and compilation of analytical data. Forensic Science International, 149(2-3), 219-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a harmonised method for the profiling of amphetamines: I. Synthesis of standards and compilation of analytical data
Show others...
2005 (English)In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 149, no 2-3, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reference material was synthesised for 21 substances that are frequently present as synthetic impurities, i.e. by-products, in illicitly produced amphetamine. Each of these substances is a typical by-product for at least one of the three approaches most often used to synthesise amphetamine, namely, the Leuckart, the reductive amination of benzyl methyl ketone, and the nitrostyrene routes. A large body of data on the substances was recorded, including the following: mass spectra, ultraviolet spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectra, infrared spectra in gas phase, and 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Amphetamine, profiling, impurities, synthesis, infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography- mass spectrometry, H-NMR, C-NMR, UV
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-30453 (URN)10.1016/j.forsciint.2004.06.020 (DOI)16024 (Local ID)16024 (Archive number)16024 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Söderström, C., Borén, H. & Krantz-Rülcher, C. (2005). Use of an electronic tongue and HPLC with electrochemical detection to differentiate molds in culture media. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 97(3), 247-257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of an electronic tongue and HPLC with electrochemical detection to differentiate molds in culture media
2005 (English)In: International Journal of Food Microbiology, ISSN 0168-1605, E-ISSN 1879-3460, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 247-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A study was conducted to further evaluate an electronic tongue, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical (EC) and UV detection as a reference method. The electronic tongue consisted of four working electrodes made of different metals and arranged in a standard three-electrode configuration. Pulses of voltage were applied to the metals, and the current responses were sampled and collected in a data matrix. The objectives of the present investigation were to examine the ability of the electronic tongue to distinguish between two mold species growing in three different media, and to obtain support for the hypothesis that the device actually discriminates between different redox-active metabolites produced by the molds. Peak areas in EC and UV HPLC chromatograms were collected in a data matrix. The electronic tongue data and the EC and UV data were then subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). A number of peaks in the HPLC-EC chromatograms indicated that the growth media contained redox-active metabolites. Moreover, PCA of peak areas in EC chromatograms revealed differences between the distribution of redox-active metabolites produced by the two species and between the three culture media. The same pattern was apparent in a PCA score plot of electronic tongue data. The peaks in the UV and EC chromatograms differed, and these were also shown by the PCA score plots.

Keywords
electronic tongue, HPLC, mold growth, electrochemical detection
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24534 (URN)10.1016/S0168-1605(03)00408-2 (DOI)6681 (Local ID)6681 (Archive number)6681 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Pavasars, I., Hagberg, J., Borén, H. & Allard, B. (2003). Alkaline degradation of cellulose: Mechanisms and kinetics. Journal of polymers and the environment, 11(2), 39-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alkaline degradation of cellulose: Mechanisms and kinetics
2003 (English)In: Journal of polymers and the environment, ISSN 1064-7546, E-ISSN 1572-8900, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cellulose powder and softwood sawdust were subjected to alkaline degradation under conditions representative of a cementitious environment for periods of 7 and 3 years, respectively. During the first 3 years, sampling was frequent, and data on the degradation of cellulose and production of isosaccharinic acid was used for establishing long-term prediction models. Samples after an additional period of 4 years were compared to the predicted values. The total rate of degradation was measured as the increase in total organic carbon (TOC) in corresponding solutions. A previously published theoretical model of degradation kinetics gave a good approximation of the present experimental data. Peeling-off, stopping, and alkaline hydrolysis reaction rate constants were obtained as model parameters, and the results suggested that the transformation of the glucose end group is the rate-limiting step in the cellulose peeling-off reaction and also determines the pH dependence of that reaction. After 3 years, isosaccharinic (ISA) acid represented 70-85% of all degradation products as quantified by capillary zone electrophoresis. The long-term prediction model indicated that all of the cellulose would be degraded after only 150-550 years. The control sampling after 7 years points toward a lower degradation of cellulose and production of ISA than predicted by the model, reflecting either a degradation of ISA that was faster than the production or a termination of the ISA production.

Keywords
alkaline degradation of cellulose, isosaccharinic acid, prediction models
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48630 (URN)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Söderström, C., Borén, H., Winquist, F. & Krantz-Rülcher, C. (2003). Use of an electronic tongue to analyze mold growth in liquid media. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 83(3), 253-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of an electronic tongue to analyze mold growth in liquid media
2003 (English)In: International Journal of Food Microbiology, ISSN 0168-1605, E-ISSN 1879-3460, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 253-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The feasibility of employing an electronic tongue to measure the growth of mold in a liquid medium was studied. We used the electronic tongue developed at Linköping University, which is based on pulsed voltammetry and consists of an array of different metal electrodes. Instead of focusing on a single parameter, this device provides information about the condition or quality of a sample or process. Accordingly, the data obtained are complex, and multivariate methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) or projection to latent structures (PLS) are required to extract relevant information. A gas chromatographic technique was developed to measure ergosterol content in mold biomass and was subsequently used as a reference method to investigate the ability of the electronic tongue to measure the growth of mold in liquid media. The result shows that the electronic tongue can monitor mold growth in liquids. In PLS analysis, the electronic tongue signals correlate well with the amount of ergosterol in the mold biomass as well as the microbially induced changes in the pH of the medium. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Electronic tongue, Liquid media, Mold growth
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46588 (URN)10.1016/S0168-1605(02)00375-6 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Jonsson, S. & Borén, H. (2002). Analysis of mono- and diesters of o-phthalic acid by solid-phase extractions with polystyrene–divinylbenzene-based polymers. Journal of Chromatography A, 963(1-2), 393-400
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of mono- and diesters of o-phthalic acid by solid-phase extractions with polystyrene–divinylbenzene-based polymers
2002 (English)In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 963, no 1-2, p. 393-400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Retention mechanisms of an unmodified and a hydroxylated polystyrene–divinylbenzene polymer were studied by solid-phase extraction of o-phthalic acid and some of its mono- and diesters from purified water and then analysing by GC–MS. The monoesters and phthalic acid were retained only when protonated (i.e. acidified with HCl to pH 0.9). Of all elution solvents tested, ethyl acetate gave the best overall recoveries (61–89%) with both polymers. Applicability to complex matrixes (e.g. acidogenic landfill leachates) was examined by introducing a washing step with acetone in acidified water (pH 0.9) to eliminate volatile fatty acids (C2–C6) from the cartridge. Finally, the method was tested on real samples.

Keywords
retention mechanisms, poly(sturenedivinylbenzene), phthalates, fatty acids
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29634 (URN)10.1016/S0021-9673(02)00647-7 (DOI)15013 (Local ID)15013 (Archive number)15013 (OAI)
Note

The original title of this article was: Analysis of mono- and diesters of o-phthalic acid by solid-phase extractions with styrene–divinylbenzene polymers.

Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Wolrath, H., Borén, H., Hallén, A. & Forsum, U. (2002). Trimethylamine content in vaginal secretion and its relation to bacterial vaginosis. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 110(11), 819-824
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trimethylamine content in vaginal secretion and its relation to bacterial vaginosis
2002 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 819-824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The presence of a fishy odor emanating from women who present with a malodorous vaginal discharge is well known. The odor is due to bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylamine (TMA) in vaginal secretion. The release of TMA from specimens of vaginal fluid following the addition of alkali is often used in making a clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV). We now report a sensitive gas chromatographic method for analysis and quantification of TMA in vaginal fluid in which weighed samples were used. In addition, a proper diagnosis of BV was obtained using Gram-stained smears of the vaginal fluid according to the method of Nugent et al. (R. P. Nugent et al., J Clin Microbiol 1991;29:297–301). We also diagnosed BV according to Hallén et al. (A. Hallén et al. Genitourin Med 1987;63:386–9). TMA was present in all women with a Nugent score between 7 and 10 and in almost all women diagnosed with BV according to the method of Hallén et al. TMA was not found or was only found in very low concentrations in vaginal fluid from women with Nugent scores of 0 to 3. TMA was also found in four women with a negative sniff test. It seems that high levels of TMA in samples of vaginal fluid are typical for BV regardless of the scoring method used for diagnosis. However, low levels of TMA, <5 μg/g vaginal fluid, do not always correlate with BV.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26449 (URN)10.1034/j.1600-0463.2002.1101108.x (DOI)000180804800008 ()10997 (Local ID)10997 (Archive number)10997 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Wolrath, H., Forsum, U., Larsson, P.-G. & Borén, H. (2001). Analysis of bacterial vaginosis-related amines in vaginal fluid by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 39(11), 4026-4031
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of bacterial vaginosis-related amines in vaginal fluid by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry
2001 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 39, no 11, p. 4026-4031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The presence of various amines in vaginal fluid from women with malodorous vaginal discharge has been reported before. The investigations have used several techniques to identify the amines. However, an optimized quantification, together with a sensitive analysis method in connection with a diagnostic procedure for vaginal discharge, including the syndrome of bacterial vaginosis, as defined by the accepted “gold standard,” has not been done before. We now report a sensitive gas chromatographic and mass spectrometric method for identifying the amines isobutylamine, phenethylamine, putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine in vaginal fluid. We used weighted samples of vaginal fluid to obtain a correct quantification. In addition, a proper diagnosis was obtained using Gram-stained smears of the vaginal fluid that were Nugent scored according to the method of Nugent et al. (R. P. Nugent et al., J. Clin. Microbiol., 29:297–301, 1991). We found that putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine occurred in high concentrations in vaginal fluid from 24 women with Nugent scores between 7 and 10. These amines either were not found or were found only in very low concentrations in vaginal fluid from women with Nugent scores of 0 to 3. There is a strong correlation between bacterial vaginosis and the presence of putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine in high concentrations in vaginal fluid.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-25913 (URN)10.1128/JCM.39.11.4026-4031.2001 (DOI)000171934200034 ()10355 (Local ID)10355 (Archive number)10355 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Johansson, P., Myhrinder, K., Gunnarson, E. & Borén, H. (2001). Comparative analysis of lubricants used for weapons. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 46(3), 441-447
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative analysis of lubricants used for weapons
2001 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, ISSN 0022-1198, E-ISSN 1556-4029, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 441-447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A method for analysis and comparison of mineral oil-based greases thickened with a metal soap is presented. The greases are first analyzed with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). This analysis differentiates between greases with different main constituents. When two samples can not be differentiated with IR, a more thorough analysis has to be performed. The base oil and the soap are separated. The soap is derivatized and the two components are each analyzed with gas chromatography. The metal ions of the soap are analyzed with scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (SEM-EDX). By the method presented, grease from a weapon may be differentiated or proven to be identical to grease collected from a suspect. As thr results indicate that the grease does not change with respect to composition when the weapon is fired, the method may be used in many cases. The application of the method to an authentic case is reported.

Keywords
forensic science, criminalistic grease, lubricant, weapon, gas chromatography, metal soap thickener, Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray detector
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48356 (URN)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Bjorklund, R., Karlsson, S., Borén, H., Allard, E. & Lundström, I. (2001). Photodesorption of fulvic acid from iron oxide surfaces into aqueous solutions. Applied Surface Science, 174(2), 166-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Photodesorption of fulvic acid from iron oxide surfaces into aqueous solutions
Show others...
2001 (English)In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 174, no 2, p. 166-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Photodesorption of thin films of fulvic acid adsorbed on planar iron oxide surfaces was monitored by ellipsometry. Description was first observed at 546 nm, and additional fractions of the adsorbed acid left the surfaces at 405 and 365 nm Similar kinetics for photodesorption was observed from metallic iron films and from porous iron oxide prepared electrochemically by deposition on porous silicon substrates. Soluble photoproducts leaving the surface H ere monitored by UV absorbance spectroscopy at 200 nm Gaseous products were not detected by mass spectrometry but the results seemed to indicate that net all of the photoproducts entered the liquid phase. Of the metal films tested which adsorbed fulvic acid from aqueous solution (Fe. Cr, Ni, Al, and Pt), it was only iron which exhibited a photodesorption effect. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
fulvic acid, adsorption, photodesorption, ellipsometry
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49304 (URN)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Johansson, I., Pavasars, I., Borén, H. & Allard, B. (2000). Analysis of water leachable organic components in incineration residues. International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, 78(3-4), 305-313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of water leachable organic components in incineration residues
2000 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0306-7319, E-ISSN 1029-0397, Vol. 78, no 3-4, p. 305-313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The composition of water leachable organics in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues is not well known. Therefore the utilisation of ashes is restricted due to the concern about their long-term environmental impact. Previous studies have focused on some highly toxic organic compounds present only in trace amounts. It is also important to know the composition of the bulk organic matter since dissolved organic carbon can alter the leachability of metals. In order to characterise water leachable organic matter in incineration residues a fractionation procedure using polymeric adsorbents was successfully developed and applied. The technique uses XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins in tandem and has been implemented on bottom ash samples from two incineration plants in Sweden in order to characterise the bulk organic matter.

Keywords
ash, water leaching, incineration, fractionation
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49314 (URN)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications