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Magnusson, Bengt
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Westerberg, J., Harder, H., Magnuson, B., Westerberg, L. & Hydén, D. (2011). Ten-year myringoplasty series: does the cause of perforation affect the success rate?. JOURNAL OF LARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, 125(2), 126-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ten-year myringoplasty series: does the cause of perforation affect the success rate?
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2011 (English)In: JOURNAL OF LARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, ISSN 0022-2151, Vol. 125, no 2, p. 126-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To present the results of primary myringoplasty procedures together with the perforation cause, perforation size and site, surgeons experience, and surgical method, and to investigate how these factors relate to graft take rates. Study design: Retrospective chart review of 243 consecutive patients undergoing primary myringoplasty with temporalis fascia underlay over a 10-year period from 1994 to 2004. Results: The overall graft take rate was 95 per cent. The retroauricular approach resulted in a 97 per cent graft take rate, whereas a significantly lower rate (77 per cent) was seen for surgery conducted via the endaural approach, or via an ear speculum. There was no relationship between other factors and tympanic membrane healing. Conclusion: No association was found between perforation cause and graft take rate. The underlay technique is safe and reliable, and the retroauricular approach is preferable as it enables good surgical access and has better results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2011
Keywords
Tympanic Membrane Perforation, Myringoplasty, Otologic Surgical Procedures, Outcomes Assessment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67016 (URN)10.1017/S0022215110002069 (DOI)000287656300004 ()
Available from: 2011-03-25 Created: 2011-03-25 Last updated: 2012-03-23
Persson, P., Harder, H. & Magnuson, B. (2007). Using the glasgow benefit plot as a prognostic instrument and for preoperative counseling in patients with otosclerosis. Otology and Neurotology, 28(6), 739-744
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using the glasgow benefit plot as a prognostic instrument and for preoperative counseling in patients with otosclerosis
2007 (English)In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 739-744Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The Glasgow Benefit Plot (GBP) is a graph showing the pure-tone thresholds preoperatively and postoperatively, and is meant to visualize the possible outcome of binaural hearing for individual patients. We used our database comprising a large number of patient data to test the usefulness of the GBP. STUDY DESIGN: Evaluation based on retrospective clinical data. SETTING: Tertiary referral center, University clinic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Audiometric assessment included bilateral preoperative and postoperative evaluation using conventional audiometry. Three preoperative groups (unilateral, asymmetric, and symmetric hearing impairment) were split into 6 postoperative categories in the GBP diagram. RESULTS: Considering the 509 operations, including 34 bilateral operations, the total outcome was distributed as follows: 34% resulted in bilateral normal hearing, 24% unilateral normal hearing (in operated ear), 14% still unilateral hearing impairment (in operated ear), 13% symmetric hearing impairment, 10% asymmetric hearing impairment (operated ear best), 5% still asymmetric hearing impairment (nonoperated ear best). The distribution of outcomes depended in part on the bone conduction level in the operated ear and in part on the hearing status in the contralateral ear. CONCLUSION: The GBP is a useful instrument that provides a means for judging the binaural hearing status. However, the outcome of stapes surgery for individual persons and for a group depends critically on the preoperative audiometric criteria for patients who are chosen for surgery. In cases of depressed bone conductions, the method does not indicate the upper limit for possible hearing improvement. A number of patients with combined hearing impairments were included in the present study population. In preoperative counseling, the GBP must be complemented with information with regard to the limitation of possible hearing improvement owing to the individual bone conduction level.

Keywords
Binaural hearing, Glasgow benefit plot, Hearing results, Otosclerosis, Stapes surgery
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48155 (URN)10.1097/MAO.0b013e31812f6f8e (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Magnuson, K., Hellstrom, S. & Magnuson, B. (2004). Structural changes in the rat tympanic membrane following repeated pressure loads. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 252(2), 76-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural changes in the rat tympanic membrane following repeated pressure loads
2004 (English)In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 252, no 2, p. 76-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Healthy adult laboratory rats were exposed to alternating negative pressure and atmospheric pressure to replicate the clinical situation found in patients with chronic sniffing habits and chronic middle ear disease. The rats were placed in a box in which the pressure changed at intervals of 30 s between atmospheric pressure and a negative pressure of -3 kPa. This was repeated continuously or periods of 3 and 7 days. At completion of the experimental period, all rats had a normal otomicroscopic status. However, histological studies demonstrated that the pars flaccida was wrinkled and the loose connective tissue contained large fibroblasts with their long axes lying in a disorganized manner. The cells of the keratinizing epithelium were thicker than normal and mitoses were seen. Epithelial crypts filled with keratin were numerous along the epithelium. In the pars tensa, all layers were thicker than normal. These findings demonstrate that repeated pressure loading can create structural changes in the tympanic membrane. © 1995 Springer-Verlag.

Keywords
Chronic otitis media, Connective tissue changes, Middle ear pressure, Tympanic membrane
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45563 (URN)10.1007/BF00168024 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Magnusson, B. (2003). Functions of the mastoid cell system: Auto-regulation of temperature and gas pressure. Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 117(2), 99-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functions of the mastoid cell system: Auto-regulation of temperature and gas pressure
2003 (English)In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, ISSN 0022-2151, E-ISSN 1748-5460, Vol. 117, no 2, p. 99-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents a new approach to understanding the physiological functions of the mastoid cell system. It is suggested that the cell system, in combination with the continuous blood flow through the adjacent large vessels, makes up a compound functional unit that serves to protect the sensitive vestibular part of the inner ear from inadequate stimulation by external temperature changes. By virtue of the large surface area of the cell system mucosa with respect to the enclosed gas volume, the mastoid cell system may also work as a pressure regulator. Variations of the bi-directional exchange of fluid over the capillary network in the mucosa will change the size of the lumen that is available for the gas in the cell system. Volumes of gas and fluid can thus be exchanged to keep the intratympanic pressure within physiological limits. The process is most effective in a cell system with a high area-to-volume ratio.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27865 (URN)10.1258/002221503762624512 (DOI)12625 (Local ID)12625 (Archive number)12625 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Magnuson, B. (2003). Functions of the mastoid cell system: auto-regulation oftemperature and gas pressure. Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 117, 99-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functions of the mastoid cell system: auto-regulation oftemperature and gas pressure
2003 (English)In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, ISSN 0022-2151, E-ISSN 1748-5460, Vol. 117, p. 99-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents a new approach to understanding the physiological functions of the mastoid cellsystem. It is suggested that the cell system, in combination with the continuous blood fow through theadjacent large vessels, makes up a compound functional unit that serves to protect the sensitive vestibularpart of the inner ear from inadequate stimulation by external temperature changes. By virtue of the largesurface area of the cell system mucosa with respect to the enclosed gas volume, the mastoid cell systemmay also work as a pressure regulator. Variations of the bi-directional exchange of fuid over the capillarynetwork in the mucosa will change the size of the lumen that is available for the gas in the cell system.Volumes of gas and fuid can thus be exchanged to keep the intratympanic pressure within physiologicallimits. The process is most effective in a cell system with a high area-to-volume ratio.

Keywords
Ear Middle; Mastoid; Physiological Processes.
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78388 (URN)10.1258/002221503762624512 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-06-13 Created: 2012-06-10 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Kovacsovics, B., Davidsson, L., Harder, H., Magnusson, B. & Ledin, T. (2002). Three-dimensional fast spin echo T2 weighted MR imagaes of the cerebellopontine angle and inner ear.. Neurootol Newslett, 6, 33-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three-dimensional fast spin echo T2 weighted MR imagaes of the cerebellopontine angle and inner ear.
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2002 (English)In: Neurootol Newslett, ISSN 1023-6422, Vol. 6, p. 33-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26856 (URN)11474 (Local ID)11474 (Archive number)11474 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2011-01-13
Bunne, M., Falk, B., Magnusson, B. & Hellström, S. (2000). Eustachian tube function varies over time in children with secretory otitis media.. Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 120, 716-723
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eustachian tube function varies over time in children with secretory otitis media.
2000 (English)In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 120, p. 716-723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27862 (URN)12622 (Local ID)12622 (Archive number)12622 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Kovacsovics, B., Davidsson, L., Harder, L., Magnusson, B. & Ledin, T. (2000). MRI screening of the cerebellopontine angel and inner ear with fast spin echo T" technique.. Archives Italiennes de Biologie, 138, 87-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MRI screening of the cerebellopontine angel and inner ear with fast spin echo T" technique.
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2000 (English)In: Archives Italiennes de Biologie, ISSN 0003-9829, Vol. 138, p. 87-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26855 (URN)11473 (Local ID)11473 (Archive number)11473 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Kovacsovics, B., Davidsson, L., Harder, H., Magnuson, B. & Ledin, T. (2000). MRI screening of the cerebellopontine angle and inner ear with fast spin-echo T2 technique. Archives Italiennes de Biologie, 138(1), 87-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MRI screening of the cerebellopontine angle and inner ear with fast spin-echo T2 technique
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2000 (English)In: Archives Italiennes de Biologie, ISSN 0003-9829, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 87-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In patients with unilateral hearing loss and dizziness it is important to rule out a cerebellopontine angle process. This is often done by audiological and otoneurological investigations. However, in many cases we must rely on the imaging of the temporal bone and the cerebello-brainstem area. The paper has presented the three dimensional (3D) Fast Spin-Echo (FSE) T2 weighted, 0.7 mm thick MR images, which in addition to being quick, does not require the use of expensive contrast material. Between September 1996 and November 1997, 152 patients with unilateral hearing loss and/or balance disorders were investigated. In normal cases the 7th and 8th nerves could be followed accurately from the brainstem to the internal auditory meatus. The found tumors were hypointense compared to the cerebrospinal fluid and could be outlined with reasonable accuracy even without gadolinium contrast. The inner ear had high signal, like cerebrospinal fluid. The patency of the cochlea could be estimated accurately. Thus, 3D FSE T2 weighted images can reliably differentiate between patients with and without pathologies of the cerebellopontine angle. The use of gadolinium contrast could be avoided in most of the cases, but contrast is necessary for differential diagnostic purposes in patients with alterations in the cerebellopontine angle or in doubtful cases.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53602 (URN)
Available from: 2010-01-26 Created: 2010-01-26 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Brown, C. & Magnusson, B. (2000). On the physics of the infant feeding bottle and middle ear sequela: Ear disease in infants can be associated with bottle feeding. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 54(1), 13-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the physics of the infant feeding bottle and middle ear sequela: Ear disease in infants can be associated with bottle feeding
2000 (English)In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: When using conventional feeding bottles, negative pressure is generated in the oral cavity, as well as, in the bottle when fluid is removed by sucking. The negative pressure inside the bottle causes the infant to suck excessively and the intraoral negative pressure may subsequently be transmitted to the middle ear via the eustachian tube. Methods: In seven infants, simultaneous pressure recordings were performed in the feeding vessel and the middle ear using three types of feeding bottles. Results: With conventional non-ventilated and under-ventilated bottles a negative pressure formed while the infant sucked and negative intratympanic pressure was frequently generated. Conclusions: It is suggested that this sequence of events may lead to secretory otitis and it's accompanying consequences. In contrast, a fully ventilated bottle showed positive pressure throughout the feeding procedure, which is similar to normal breast-feeding, and negative pressure changes were not recorded in the middle ear.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27863 (URN)10.1016/S0165-5876(00)00330-X (DOI)12623 (Local ID)12623 (Archive number)12623 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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