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Albertsson, Maria
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Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Andersson, E., Albertsson, M. & Holmqvist, A. (2017). GRACE: Geriatric patients tReated with Avastin in CRC multiple linEs. Clinical Practice, 14(3), 175-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GRACE: Geriatric patients tReated with Avastin in CRC multiple linEs
2017 (English)In: Clinical Practice, ISSN 2044-9038, E-ISSN 2044-9046, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Continuous treatment with bevacizumab in elderly patients with mCRC: A phase IV prospective, open-label, single-arm trial to evaluate outcomes and safety with continuous bevacizumab treatment in combination with chemotherapy over disease progression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Future Medicine, 2017
Keywords
Bevacizumab; Capecitabine; Colon cancer; Elderly patients; Rectal cancer
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147026 (URN)10.4172/clinical-practice.1000111 (DOI)2-s2.0-85029046902 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-09
Hagman, H., Frodin, J.-E. -., Berglund, A., Sundberg, J., Vestermark, L. W., Albertsson, M., . . . Johnsson, A. (2016). A randomized study of KRAS-guided maintenance therapy with bevacizumab, erlotinib or metronomic capecitabine after first-line induction treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: the Nordic ACT2 trial. Annals of Oncology, 27(1), 140-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomized study of KRAS-guided maintenance therapy with bevacizumab, erlotinib or metronomic capecitabine after first-line induction treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: the Nordic ACT2 trial
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2016 (English)In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maintenance treatment (mt) with bevacizumab (bev) +/- erlotinib (erlo) has modest effect after induction chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We hypothesized the efficacy of erlo to be dependent on KRAS mutational status and investigated this by exploring mt strategies with bev +/- erlo and low-dose capecitabine (cap). Included patients had mCRC scheduled for first-line therapy, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-1 and no major comorbidities. Treatment with XELOX/FOLFOX or XELIRI/FOLFIRI + bev was given for 18 weeks. After induction, patients without progression were eligible for randomization to mt; KRAS wild-type (wt) patients were randomized to bev +/- erlo (arms wt-BE, N = 36 versus wt-B, N = 35), KRAS mutated (mut) patients were randomized to bev or metronomic cap (arms mut-B, N = 34 versus mut-C, N = 33). Primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) rate (PFSr) at 3 months after start of mt. A pooled analysis of KRAS wt patients from the previous ACT study was performed. We included 233 patients. Median age was 64 years, 62% male, 68% ECOG 0, 52% with primary tumor in situ. A total of 138 patients started mt after randomization. PFSr was 64.7% versus 63.6% in wt-B versus wt-BE, P = 1.000; and 75% versus 66.7% in mut-B versus mut-C, P = 0.579, with no significant difference in median PFS and overall survival (OS). In the pooled cohort, median PFS was 3.7 months in wt-B (N = 64) and 5.7 months in wt-BE (N = 62) (hazard ratios 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.70-1.50, P = 0.867). The frequency of any grade 3/4 toxicities during mt was: 28%/58%/18%/15% (wt-B/wt-BE/mut-B/mut-C). Addition of erlo to bev as mt in KRAS wt mCRC did not significantly improve PFS or OS, but it did increase toxicity. KRAS status does not seem to influence the outcome of treatment with erlotinib. Metronomic cap warrants further investigation in mt strategies, given our explorative results. NCT01229813.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2016
Keywords
metastatic colorectal cancer; maintenance treatment; bevacizumab; erlotinib; capecitabine; metronomic chemotherapy
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124635 (URN)10.1093/annonc/mdv490 (DOI)000368354600016 ()26483047 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-09 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Vernmark, K., Albertsson, M., Björnsson, B., Gasslander, T., Sandström, P., Sun, X.-F. & Holmqvist, A. (2015). From palliative to curative treatment - stage IV mucinous adenocarcinoma, successfully treated with metronomic capecitabine in combination with Bevacizumab and surgery- a case report. BMC Cancer, 15(884)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From palliative to curative treatment - stage IV mucinous adenocarcinoma, successfully treated with metronomic capecitabine in combination with Bevacizumab and surgery- a case report
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2015 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 15, no 884Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) represents 6-19 % of all colorectal carcinoma. It is associated with poorer response to chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Case presentation: A 27-year-old Swedish woman presented with stomach pain and weight loss, and was diagnosed with locally advanced MAC in the transverse colon as well as 3 liver metastases. Neoadjuvant treatment with fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FLOX) failed due to several infections, pulmonary embolism and deteriorated performance status. The patient was therefore considered palliative. Palliative treatment with metronomic capecitabine 500 mg x 2 daily and bevacizumab every other week were initiated. After 4 months of treatment the tumors had regressed and the patient was able to undergo radical surgery, thereby changing the treatment intention from palliative to curative. No adjuvant chemotherapy was given. There were no signs of recurrence 9 months later. Conclusions: The role of the combination of metronomic capecitabine and bevacizumab in patients with MAC merits further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2015
Keywords
Mucinous adenocarcinoma; Bevaczumab; Metronomic capecitabine
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123523 (URN)10.1186/s12885-015-1908-3 (DOI)000365272200003 ()26555668 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|foundation of Oncological Clinical Research in Linkoping

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Jung, M., Holmqvist, A., Sun, X.-F. & Albertsson, M. (2014). A clinical study of metastasized rectal cancer treatment: assessing a multimodal approach. Medical Oncology, 31(3), 839
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A clinical study of metastasized rectal cancer treatment: assessing a multimodal approach
2014 (English)In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 839-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Metastasized rectal cancer has long been considered incurable. During recent years, the treatment of rectal cancer patients has been improved, and nowadays, a subgroup of patients might even be cured. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal timing of treatment in a multimodal therapy schedule in order to see whether the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to conventional chemotherapy was effective. The study included 39 patients with metastatic rectal cancer between 2009 and 2011, and three were excluded due to the lack of metastases or lack of follow-up information. The remaining 36 patients were divided into groups by treatment intention. The group with curative intention received mainly oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) in combination with capecitabine (Xeloda) with or without bevacizumab (Avastin) for 2 months followed by preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and surgery. Palliative patients had very different treatments depending on their needs of palliation. The median survival time for patients with curative intention was 31 months and for the palliative patients 12 months. Four of the patients (11%) with curative intention were considered cured at the end of follow-up. The response to chemotherapy after 2-month treatment is a good prognostic sign for which patients can be cured. Long-lasting palliation can be obtained with this treatment schedule. The main side effects were gastrointestinal events, including bowel perforation, neuropathy, thrombo-embolic disease and reduced general condition. All side effects are known, and the treatment is considered tolerable. We conclude that a good treatment schedule would be oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) in combination with capecitabine (Xeloda) with or without bevacizumab (Avastin) for 2 months, followed by preoperative RT and surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Rectal cancer, Metastasis, Bevacizumab, Chemotherapy
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106890 (URN)10.1007/s12032-014-0839-1 (DOI)000337728700005 ()24477647 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-23 Created: 2014-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Yang, L., Ma, Q., Yu, Y.-Y., Wang, C., Meng, W.-J., Adell, G., . . . Sun, X.-F. (2014). Efficacy of Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy in Older Patients With Colorectal Cancer A STROBE-compliant article. Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), 93(28)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficacy of Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy in Older Patients With Colorectal Cancer A STROBE-compliant article
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2014 (English)In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 93, no 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to assess the efficacy of surgery and adjuvant therapy in older patients (age greater than= 70 years) with colorectal cancer (CRC). Older CRC patients are under-represented in available clinical trials, and therefore their outcomes after receiving surgery and adjuvant therapy are unclear. From two prospective Swedish databases, we assessed a cohort of 1021 patients who underwent curative surgery for stage I, II, or III primary CRC, with or without adjuvant chemotherapy/ radiotherapy. Of the patients with colon cancer (n = 467), 182 (39%) were aged less than70 years, 162 (35%) aged 70 to 80 years, and 123 (26%) were aged greater than= 80 years. Of rectal cancer patients (n = 554), 264 (48%) were aged less than70 years, 234 (42%) aged 70 to 80 years, and 56 (10%) aged greater than= 80 years. Older patients with either colon or rectal cancer had higher comorbidity than did younger patients. Older patients with colon cancer had equivalent postoperative morbidity and 30-day mortality to younger patients. Rectal cancer patients aged greater than= 80 years had a higher 30-day mortality than younger patients (odds ratio OR], 2.37; 95% confidence interval CI], 1.6-4.55; P = 0.03). For either colon or rectal cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy compromised the 5-year overall survival (OS) of older patients with stage II disease and had no effect on those with stage III disease. Receiving adjuvant chemotherapy was a poor factor of OS for older patients with either colon (HR 1.88, 95% CI: 1.20-4.35, P = 0.03) or rectal cancer (HR 1.72, 95% CI: 1.052.26, P = 0.004). Preoperative short-course radiotherapy improved both OS and local control for older patients with stage III rectal cancer and had no effect on those with stage II disease. Radiotherapy was a favorable factor for the OS of the older patients with rectal cancer (HR 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21-3.57, P = 0.01). In conclusion, Older CRC patients had equal safety of surgery as younger patients, except rectal cancer patients aged greater than= 80 years that had a higher mortality. Adjuvant 5FU-based chemotherapy did not benefit older CRC patient, while neoadjuvant radiotherapy improved the prognosis of older patients with stage III rectal cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams andamp; Wilkins, 2014
Keywords
colorectal neoplasm; surgery; adjuvant chemotherapy; neoadjuvant radiotherapy; survival; recurrence
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113578 (URN)10.1097/MD.0000000000000266 (DOI)000346762200026 ()25526455 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Cancer Foundation; Swedish Research Council; Health Research Council in the South-East of Sweden; Natural Science Foundation of China [81472304]

Available from: 2015-01-23 Created: 2015-01-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Miger, J., Holmqvist, A., Sun, X.-F. & Albertsson, M. (2014). Low-dose capecitabine (Xeloda) for treatment for gastrointestinal cancer. Medical Oncology, 31(3), 870
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-dose capecitabine (Xeloda) for treatment for gastrointestinal cancer
2014 (English)In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 870-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prodrug capecitabine (Xeloda) has been an important drug for treatment for gastrointestinal cancer (GI-cancer). This study explores the efficacy of continuous metronomic Xeloda, as well as tolerability and best response during treatment. Patients (n=35) with stage IV GI-cancer were included in the study and were divided into two groups; upper (n=13) and lower (n=22) GI-cancer. All patients were given continuous metronomic Xeloda (500 mg×2). Best response was measured by radiological and clinical examination including laboratory results. Standard RECIST criteria were used. Median age was 66 (range 29-86). Those patients who received first and second line had the longest duration of treatment. For patients with metastatic gastrointestinal cancer, metronomic capecitabine (Xeloda) may be beneficial both as far as tumor control and quality of life is concerned. In this pilot study, palliation for more than 2 years is observed for 6 of the 35 patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Capecitabine, Gastrointestinal cancer, Metronomic treatment, Response, QoL
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106891 (URN)10.1007/s12032-014-0870-2 (DOI)000337728700034 ()24510794 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-23 Created: 2014-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Kotti, A., Holmqvist (Knutsen), A., Albertsson, M. & Sun, X.-F. (2014). SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 88(5), 1196-1202
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 88, no 5, p. 1196-1202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT.

Methods and Materials

The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry.

Results

Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569).

Conclusions

SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106281 (URN)10.1016/j.ijrobp.2013.12.041 (DOI)000333460200031 ()24661672 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-06 Created: 2014-05-05 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Hedayati, E., Johnsson, A., Alinaghizadeh, H., Schedin, A., Nyman, H. & Albertsson, M. (2013). Cognitive, psychosocial, somatic and treatment factors predicting return to work after breast cancer treatment. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 27(2), 380-387
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive, psychosocial, somatic and treatment factors predicting return to work after breast cancer treatment
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2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 380-387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scand J Caring Sci; 2013; 27; 380387 Cognitive, psychosocial, somatic and treatment factors predicting return to work after breast cancer treatment Background: Breast cancer (BC) may affect the ability to work. In this study, we want to identify any associations between cognitive, psychosocial, somatic and treatment factors with time to return to work (RTW) among women treated for BC. Methods and participants: At eight (baseline) and 11(follow-up) months after BC diagnosis, women who had received adjuvant treatment for early BC at Stockholm South General Hospital completed the Headminder neuropsychological tests to obtain the Cognitive Stability Index (CSI), the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire and its Breast Cancer Module. At both time points, we compared the scores from women who had returned to work with those who had not. We also reviewed the medical certificates of women still on sick leave at 8, 11 and 18months after diagnosis to determine why they had not returned to work. Results: At baseline, 29 of 45 enroled women were working and 15 were not (one dropped out after baseline testing). The 14 women still not working 11months after BC diagnosis had more advanced BC (OR=3.64, 95% CI 2.017.31), lymph-node involvement (OR=18.80, 95% CI 5.3290.69) and Her 2-positive tumours (OR=10.42,95% CI 2.1965.32) than did working women. None of the scores for the four cognitive domains changed significantly at follow-up in either group. Comments on the medical certificates generally supported these findings. Independently of any adjuvant cancer therapy, overall quality of life improved and most women did RTW 18months after BC diagnosis. Conclusions: Chemotherapy is associated with longer periods of sick leave. Cognitive functions do not predict RTW. Independently of any adjuvant therapy, most women eventually RTW in a few months. The ability to predict RTW after BC treatment should help prepare higher-risk patients for delayed RTW and allow earlier interventions to restore their social relations and quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
breast cancer, sick leave, chemotherapy, adjuvant, return to work, quality of life, cognitive functions
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-94319 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01046.x (DOI)000318815700022 ()
Available from: 2013-06-24 Created: 2013-06-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Hedayati, E., Alinaghizadeh, H., Schedin, A., Nyman, H. & Albertsson, M. (2012). Effects of adjuvant treatment on cognitive function in women with early breast cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 16(3), 315-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of adjuvant treatment on cognitive function in women with early breast cancer
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2012 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 315-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Whether adjuvant therapy impairs cognitive function in women with breast cancer (BC) is unclear. We determined the effects of adjuvant therapy on cognitive function in women with early BC. Methods: We consecutively and prospectively enrolled women aged 40-69 years who had a positive radiographic finding from the mammography screening program at Stockholm South General Hospital. All women completed the Headminder Web-based neuropsychological battery Cognitive Stability Index (CSI) for response speed, processing speed, memory, and attention before diagnosis (T1), after surgery and before adjuvant treatment (T2), 6 months after start of adjuvant treatment (T3), and after another 3 months of follow-up (T4). Women with BC were divided into those receiving chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or no adjuvant medical therapy. Women without a diagnosis of BC served as healthy controls. Results: Of the 146 women enrolled, 77 had BC of whom 18 received chemotherapy; 45, hormone therapy, and 14, no adjuvant medical therapy; 69 were healthy controls. Memory scores for women with BC were significantly lower than those for controls over time, even after controlling for age and education. Memory and response speed scores were lower after chemotherapy than before (P less than 0.01 for both). Processing speed and attention improved significantly over time in all groups, a result consistent with a practice effect. Conclusion: Our results indicate subtle changes related to time course and treatment. Especially, that chemotherapy may impair memory and response speed in women with BC, consistent with those reported by BC survivors after adjuvant medical treatment. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Breast cancer; Cancer treatments; Cognitive functioning; Longitudinal study
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79787 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2011.07.006 (DOI)000305377100018 ()
Available from: 2012-08-17 Created: 2012-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Hedayati, E., Schedin, A., Nyman, H., Alinaghizadeh, H. & Albertsson, M. (2011). The effects of breast cancer diagnosis and surgery on cognitive functions. Acta Oncologica, 50(7), 1027-1036
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of breast cancer diagnosis and surgery on cognitive functions
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2011 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 1027-1036Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Women with breast cancer (BC) report cognitive impairment. Receiving a BC diagnosis may have a negative psychological impact. We sought to determine whether a diagnosis of BC and subsequent surgical treatment reduced cognitive function. Material and methods. We recruited women, who had a positive radiographic finding, consecutively from the mammography screening program at Stockholm South General Hospital. All subjects completed the Headminder Web-based neuropsychological battery Cognitive Stability Index (CSI) for response speed, processing speed, memory, and attention at enrolment (T1, Baseline). CSI was administered again, after BC was ruled out, or after sector resection or mastectomy, if BC was confirmed by cytology or biopsy (T2, Retest). Results and conclusion. Of the 148 women approached, 146 were enrolled; 69 were healthy and 77 had BC. Comparison between groups at baseline, according to independent t-test, showed significant differences in response speed and processing speed. Cognitive abilities did not decline in either group on any of the measured domains. Our results suggest that a diagnosis of BC and subsequent surgery is not associated with substantial cognitive decline at retest. However, the lack of improvement in attention at retest among BC patients may be suggestive of a decline.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71071 (URN)10.3109/0284186X.2011.572911 (DOI)000294868000004 ()
Available from: 2011-09-30 Created: 2011-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-08
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