liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Kindborg, Mikael
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Kindborg, M. & Sökjer, P. (2007). How Preschool Children Used a Behaviour-Based Programming Tool. In: Interaction design with Children,2007.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Preschool Children Used a Behaviour-Based Programming Tool
2007 (English)In: Interaction design with Children,2007, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41225 (URN)55370 (Local ID)55370 (Archive number)55370 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Kindborg, M. & McGee, K. (2007). Visual programming with analogical representations: Inspirations from a semiotic analysis of comics. Journal of Visual Languages and Computing, 18(2), 99-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visual programming with analogical representations: Inspirations from a semiotic analysis of comics
2007 (English)In: Journal of Visual Languages and Computing, ISSN 1045-926X, E-ISSN 1095-8533, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 99-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Analogical representations based on pictures of domain objects can be used in visual programming to provide a close mapping between the program and the resulting runtime display, which can make programming easier for children and other users. The use of graphical rewrite rules with before and after pictures is an example of this approach. Graphical rewrite rules have some similarities with comics strips, which also use picture sequences of graphical objects to describe dynamics in a static form. However, the visual language of comics is not used to its full potential in visual programming. We discuss how a semiotic analysis of comics can be used to address some of the limitations of graphical rewrite rules. We use a visual programming system we have designed to illustrate that comic strips can express more general computations and be more intuitive and flexible than traditional graphical rewrites. Our conclusion is that the visual language of comics has a strong potential for increasing the expressiveness and flexibility of visual programming with analogical representations of domain objects, while maintaining a direct mapping between the program representation and the runtime representation. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Children, Comics, Graphical rewrite rules, Semiotics, Visual programming
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49953 (URN)10.1016/j.jvlc.2007.01.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Fernaeus, Y., Kindborg, M. & Scholz, R. (2006). Rethinking Children's Programming with Contextual Signs. In: Interaction Design and Children,2006.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rethinking Children's Programming with Contextual Signs
2006 (English)In: Interaction Design and Children,2006, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41242 (URN)55390 (Local ID)55390 (Archive number)55390 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Kindborg, M. (2003). Concurrent comics: programming of social agents by children. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköpings universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concurrent comics: programming of social agents by children
2003 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis presents a study of how the visual language of comics can be used for programming of social agents. Social agents are interactive and animated characters that can express emotions and behaviours in relation to other agents. Such agents could be programmed by children to create learning games and simulations. In order to make programming easier, it would be desirable to support the mental transformation needed to link the static program source code to the dynamic behaviour of the running program. Comic books use a representation that captures the dynamics of a story in a visually direct way, and may thus offer a convenient paradigm for programming of social agents using a static representation. The thesis addresses the questions of how comic strips and other signs used in comics can be applied to programming of social agents in a way that makes the source code resemble the appearance of the running program, and how such programs are understood by children. To study these questions, a comic strip programming tool called "Concurrent Comics" has been developed. In Concurrent Comics, social agent programs are represented as a collection of events expressed as comic strips. The tool has been used by children at the age of ten and eleven during several field studies in a school. In classroom studies, the children were successful in creating language learning games with the Concurrent Comics tool in a relatively short time (2 to 3 hours). However, most games had a narrative character and a fairly linear structure. The results from the field studies show that the children tend to interpret comic strip programs as sequential stories. Still, the program examples presented show that comic strip programs look similar to and have a direct visual mapping to the runtime appearance. The conclusion is that the language conventions of comics can be used to represent social agent programs in a visually direct way, but that children have to learn the intended interpretation of comic strips as potentially non-linear and concurrent events to program more simulation-oriented and open-ended games.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköpings universitet, 2003. p. 316
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 821
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35565 (URN)27627 (Local ID)91-7373-651-1 (ISBN)27627 (Archive number)27627 (OAI)
Public defence
2003-06-02, Alan Turing, Hus E, Linköpings Universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (Swedish)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Kindborg, M. (2002). Comics, Programming, Children and Narratives. In: Interaction Design and Children (pp. 93-109).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comics, Programming, Children and Narratives
2002 (English)In: Interaction Design and Children, 2002, p. 93-109Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Studies of how 10 to 11 year old children understand eventbasedprogram descriptions based on comic strips showed thatnarrative interpretations of such programs were common. A narrativeperspective was taken both when using paper prototypes and computerprototypes, but was stronger on paper than on the computer. While anarrative model of programming can interfere with the creation ofnon-linear simulation-oriented programs, a classroom study showedthat the children were able to use a narrative perspective onprogramming to create story-based games with interactive agents.Thus, visual event-based programming could be an alternative tohypertext authoring for the creation of interactive stories where adynamic content is considered important.

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61342 (URN)
Available from: 2010-11-15 Created: 2010-11-15 Last updated: 2010-12-02
Kindborg, M., Åberg, J. & Shahmehri, N. (1999). A lightweight agent framework for interactive multi-agent applications (1ed.). In: Julie Ratner (Ed.), Proceedings of Fourth International Conference on the Practical Application of Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agents. Paper presented at Fourth International Conference on the Practical Application of Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agents, PAAM99, April 20-21, London, UK (pp. 123-142).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A lightweight agent framework for interactive multi-agent applications
1999 (English)In: Proceedings of Fourth International Conference on the Practical Application of Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agents, 1999, 1, p. 123-142Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Usability issues are traditionally associated with user interfaces rather than with agent frameworks. We argue that the metaphors and models used in a framework will affect the thinking of the developer, and will influence the application design. Therefore, usability is of central importance for successful software development, and for reducing development and maintenance costs. We discuss the design and implementation of a lightweight agent framework for interactive multi-agent applications. A lightweight framework is advantageous for distributed interactive applications, for instance applications running on hand-held devices with limited memory. The design is based on minimalism and simplicity. We present the results from a usability study of the framework, where issues such as learnability and attitude have been evaluated. The study shows that minimalist design principles are useful for achieving understandable and navigable frameworks.

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54758 (URN)
Conference
Fourth International Conference on the Practical Application of Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agents, PAAM99, April 20-21, London, UK
Available from: 2010-04-08 Created: 2010-04-08 Last updated: 2010-04-08
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications