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Kågesten, Owe
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Engelbrecht, J., Bergsten, C. & Kågesten, O. (2017). Conceptual and procedural approaches to mathematics in the engineering curriculum: Views of qualified engineers. European Journal of Engineering Education, 42(5), 570-586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptual and procedural approaches to mathematics in the engineering curriculum: Views of qualified engineers
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 570-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The research interest underpinning this paper concerns the type ofmathematical knowledge engineering students may acquire during theirspecialised education in terms of the conceptual and proceduraldimensions of doing and using mathematics. This study draws oninterviews with 25 qualified engineers from South Africa and Swedenregarding their views on the role of mathematics in engineeringeducation, with special focus on the conceptual and procedural aspectsof mathematical knowledge. A thematic analysis of the interview dataled to the identification of two main themes. According to theconceptual view a predominantly conceptual approach is needed andvalued more than procedural skills, while the balanced view emphasisesa balance of conceptual understanding and procedural fluency as wellas links between them. It is suggested that the mathematical educationof engineers would need to be more conceptually oriented to preparefor the demands at the workplace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Conceptual and procedural knowledge; undergraduate mathematics; engineering education; views of engineers
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139232 (URN)10.1080/03043797.2017.1343278 (DOI)2-s2.0-85021268611 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Conceptual and procedural understanding in mathematics courses for engineering students
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Bergsten, C., Engelbrecht, J. & Kågesten, O. (2015). Conceptual or procedural mathematics for engineering students – views of two qualified engineers from two countries. International journal of mathematical education in science and technology, 46(7), 979-990
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptual or procedural mathematics for engineering students – views of two qualified engineers from two countries
2015 (English)In: International journal of mathematical education in science and technology, ISSN 0020-739X, E-ISSN 1464-5211, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 979-990Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study forms part of a collaboration project between universities in South Africa and Sweden in which we investigate whether the emphasis in undergraduate mathematics courses for engineering students would benefit from being more conceptually oriented than a traditional more procedurally oriented way of teaching. In this paper, we report in some detail from two interviews with professional engineers, selected to represent two different ‘poles’ of engineering work. The aim was to explore different kinds of arguments regarding the role of mathematics in engineering work, as well as some common across contexts. Both interviewees feel that conceptual mathematics is more important for engineering work, although the role of the procedural aspect was seen by one of the interviewees also to be important, but in a very intricate way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
Keywords
engineering mathematics, practising engineers, conceptual and procedural knowledge, interviews
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121846 (URN)10.1080/0020739X.2015.1075615 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Engelbrecht, J., Bergsten, C. & Kågesten, O. (2012). Conceptual and Procedural Approaches to Mathematics in the Engineering Curriculum: Student Conceptions and Performance. Journal of Engineering Education, 101(1), 138-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptual and Procedural Approaches to Mathematics in the Engineering Curriculum: Student Conceptions and Performance
2012 (English)In: Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 1069-4730, E-ISSN 1524-4873, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 138-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND

Demands by engineering faculties of mathematics departments have traditionally been for teaching    computational skills while also expecting analytic and creative knowledge-based skills. We    report on a project between two institutions, one in South Africa and one in Sweden, that investigated    whether the emphasis in undergraduate mathematics courses for engineering students would    benefit from being more conceptually oriented than the traditional more procedurally oriented way  of teaching.

PURPOSE (HYPOTHESIS)

We focus on how second-year engineering students respond to the conceptual-procedural distinction,    comparing performance and confidence between Swedish and South African groups of students in answering    conceptual and procedural mathematics problems. We also compare these students’ conceptions on the  role of conceptual and procedural mathematics problems within and outside their mathematics studies.

DESIGN/METHOD

An instrument consisting of procedural and conceptual items as well as items on student opinions on the    roles of the different types of knowledge in their studies was conducted with groups of second-year engineering  students at two universities, one in each country.

RESULTS

Although differences between the two countries are small, Swedish students see procedural items to be    more common in their mathematics studies while the South African students find both conceptual and    procedural items common; the latter group see the conceptually oriented items as more common in their  studies outside the mathematics courses.

CONCLUSIONS

Students view mathematics as procedural. Conceptual mathematics is seen as relevant outside mathematics.    The use of mathematics in other subjects within engineering education can be experienced differently    by students from different institutions, indicating that the same type of education can handle the application  of mathematics in different ways in different institutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Engineering Education, 2012
Keywords
conceptual and procedural thinking, confidence, mathematics
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75283 (URN)10.1002/j.2168-9830.2012.tb00045.x (DOI)000299496300008 ()
Available from: 2012-02-27 Created: 2012-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Kågesten, O., Bergsten, C. & Engelbrecht, J. (2009). Undergraduate students’ preference for procedural to conceptual solutions to mathematical problems. In: Accepterat för publicering vid Delta 09, november 2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate students’ preference for procedural to conceptual solutions to mathematical problems
2009 (English)In: Accepterat för publicering vid Delta 09, november 2009, 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports from a collaboration project between South Africa and Sweden, in which we want to investigate whether the emphasis in undergraduate mathematics courses for engineering students should be more conceptual than the current traditional way of teaching. Based on a review of the distinction between conceptual and procedural knowledge, an analysis of student solutions to tasks designed to be solved with a conceptual approach but ‘proceduralised’ by the students, sheds some new light on this classical distinction. It is argued that the distinction can be operationalised in test items in a meaningful way but that caution need to be taken in interpreting the results considering the complex interdependence of these constructs when doing mathematical work.

Keywords
conceptual thinking, procedural thinking, undergraduate mathematics AMS Subject Classification: 97C20; 97C50
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50971 (URN)
Available from: 2009-10-15 Created: 2009-10-15 Last updated: 2016-11-30
Engelbrecht, J., Bergsten, C. & Kågesten, O. (2009). Undergraduate students' preference for procedural to conceptual solutions to mathematical problems. International journal of mathematical education in science and technology, 40(7), 927-940
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate students' preference for procedural to conceptual solutions to mathematical problems
2009 (English)In: International journal of mathematical education in science and technology, ISSN 0020-739X, E-ISSN 1464-5211, ISSN 0020-739X, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 927-940Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reports from a collaboration project between South Africa and Sweden, in which we want to investigate whether the emphasis in undergraduate mathematics courses for engineering students should be more conceptual than the current traditional way of teaching. On the basis of a review of the distinction between conceptual and procedural knowledge, an analysis of student solutions to tasks designed to be solved with a conceptual approach but ‘proceduralized’ by the students sheds some new light on this classical distinction. It is argued that the distinction can be operationalized in test items in a meaningful way but that caution needs to be taken in interpreting the results considering the complex interdependence of these constructs when doing mathematical work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, UK: Taylor & Francis, 2009
Keywords
conceptual thinking, procedural thinking, undergraduate mathematics
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56786 (URN)10.1080/00207390903200968 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-06-04 Created: 2010-06-04 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Kågesten, O. & Engelbrecht, J. (2007). Student group presentations: A learning instrument in undergraduate mathematics for engineering students. European Journal of Engineering Education, 32(3), 303-314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student group presentations: A learning instrument in undergraduate mathematics for engineering students
2007 (English)In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 303-314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study we created an environment for peer learning, where students teach students by making oral presentations in groups about solving mathematical problems and explaining theoretical background in mathematics, during the first year of an undergraduate engineering programme at the Norrköping campus of the Linköping University. In order to strengthen the students' understanding and perception of central mathematical concepts, the study was designed to take the students through five different learning experiences, preparing the presentation, presenting the mathematics, listening to others presenting, discussion by all students after the presentation and feedback by the teacher to the small group of students separate from the other students. We study how oral presentations work as a learning and assessment method. The study consisted of three stages.  After a first run of the presentations as a learning instrument, three guidebooks with recommendations to students and teachers were developed in order to assist students as well as teachers about their role in this learning environment. Students’ and teachers’ views on the student presentations as learning instrument were surveyed before and after the intervention.  In stage three, students were interviewed individually to ascertain the relevant success of the different learning experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon: Taylor & Francis, 2007
Keywords
Undergraduate; Mathematics; Collaborative learning; Assessment; Student presentations
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50942 (URN)10.1080/03043790701276833 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-02-02 Created: 2009-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Houston, K., Engelbrecht, J., Wood, L., Harding, A., Holton, D., Barton, B. & Kågesten, O. (2006). Professional development of mathematics academics. In: 3rd International Conference on the Teaching of Mathematics,2006. Publicerad på CD: Publicerad på CD
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional development of mathematics academics
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2006 (English)In: 3rd International Conference on the Teaching of Mathematics,2006, Publicerad på CD: Publicerad på CD , 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is almost 30 years since Morris Kline published his wide-ranging critique of undergraduate education in his book, "Why The Professor can't Teach" [1]. In 1999, Steve Krantz, in his book, "How to Teach Mathematics" [2] reported that academics were paying much more attention to their teaching duties than before. Both of these books were largely about the situation in the USA. This paper explores ideas around the early in-service and continuing professional development of academics and uses examples from several countries.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Publicerad på CD: Publicerad på CD, 2006
Keywords
Educational research, professional development
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36574 (URN)31659 (Local ID)31659 (Archive number)31659 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10
Kågesten, O. & Engelbrecht, J. (2006). Supplementary explanations in undergraduate mathematics assessment: A forced formative writing activity. European Journal of Engineering Education, 31(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supplementary explanations in undergraduate mathematics assessment: A forced formative writing activity
2006 (English)In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 31, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

 Engineering students in technical universities in Sweden, as probably in many other countries, tend to treat mathematics as a mechanical subject in which you do calculations and manipulations and very little explanation. In order to create deeper understanding, verbal or written explanations by students can be beneficial. In our study we show a possible way of getting students to reflect about their mechanical solutions to mathematical problems. The method is based on the supplementary written explanations that students may provide in their written examination in what would be a second stage of the examination, a so-called -home exam-. In our project students were forced to rethink their answers, attending to comments and questions posed by the teacher who marked the scripts and supplying further explanation of his/her work and judging from the results of the research, this facet of the project was successful. The additional opportunity to reflect on their responses assisted students in understanding the mathematical concepts deeper and exposed their weaknesses and gaps in their knowledge. 

Keywords
undergraduate mathematics, formative assessment, writing
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36590 (URN)31690 (Local ID)31690 (Archive number)31690 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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