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Horton, Paul
Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Strindberg, J., Horton, P. & Thornberg, R. (2019). Coolness and social vulnerability: Swedish pupils’ reflections on participant roles in school bullying. Research Papers in Education, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coolness and social vulnerability: Swedish pupils’ reflections on participant roles in school bullying
2019 (English)In: Research Papers in Education, ISSN 0267-1522, E-ISSN 1470-1146, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to examine Swedish school pupils’ perspectives on why some pupils engage in bullying, support bullying or avoid standing up for the one(s) being bullied, despite a shared understanding that bullying is wrong. Through the use of focus group interviews combined with two bullying vignettes, a total of 74 pupils from grades 5 and 6 (i.e. 11–12 years of age) from two public primary schools in socioeconomically diverse areas were asked for their perspectives on various participant roles in bullying. In interpreting the vignette scenario, the participants emphasised the importance of perceived coolness, as well as the risk of being bullied. In seeking to avoid becoming a ‘victim’ of bullying, the situational roles of ‘bully’, ‘assistant’, ‘reinforcer’ and ‘outsider’ were understood as potential means for promoting, maintaining or protecting one’s own social position. The findings of the study challenge previous understandings of bullying as an act of harmful or aggressive intentionality and rather highlight the relational and situational aspects of bullying.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Bullying, bystanders, coolness, school, social positioning
National Category
Educational Sciences Pedagogy Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158097 (URN)10.1080/02671522.2019.1615114 (DOI)000470396600001 ()2-s2.0-85065711050 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, D0775301
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council [D0775301]; Vetenskapsradet [D0775301]

Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Horton, P. (2019). Recognising shadows: masculinism, resistance, and recognition in Vietnam. Norma
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recognising shadows: masculinism, resistance, and recognition in Vietnam
2019 (English)In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Pride parades, LGBT rights demonstrations, and revisions to the Marriage and Family Law highlight the extent to which norms and values related to gender, sexuality, marriage, and the family have recently been challenged in Vietnam. They also illuminate the gendered power relations being played out in the socio-cultural context of Vietnam, and thus open up for a more in-depth consideration of the ways in which LGBT people have experienced and resisted these relations in everyday life. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Vietnam's two largest cities, Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, in 2012, this article discusses the relations between these power relations, the dominant Vietnamese discourse of masculinity, or masculinism, and the politics of recognition. In particular, it focuses on the ways in which Vietnamese gay men have resisted heteronormative normalising practices in their search for the recognition of self and others. Utilising the local term bóng, or ‘shadow’, the article highlights the ways in which light and shadow can be used metaphorically to understand gay men's struggles for the recognition of self and others in contemporary Vietnam.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Vietnam, LGBT, masculinism, recognition, power, resistance
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154057 (URN)10.1080/18902138.2019.1565166 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059967027 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Horton, P. (2019). The bullied boy: masculinity, embodiment, and the gendered social-ecology of Vietnamese school bullying. Gender and Education, 31(3), 394-407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The bullied boy: masculinity, embodiment, and the gendered social-ecology of Vietnamese school bullying
2019 (English)In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 394-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article considers the ways in which school bullying is both gendered and embodied. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in two lower-secondary schools in northern Vietnam, the article focuses on the experiences of one ninth-grade boy, who was regularly bullied by his classmates, and whose experiences of bullying appeared to be embodied for all to see. Inspired by Arthur Brittan’s notion of masculinism, Elizabeth Grosz’s use of the möbius strip metaphor for understanding embodiment, and Urie Bronfenbrenner’s conceptualization of the ecological environment, I argue that school bullying needs to be understood not only in terms of the interactions between individuals or groups of individuals, but also in terms of the specific gendered social-ecological environment within which those interactions occur.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
bullying, masculinities, embodiment, boys, ethnography, south east asia
National Category
Pedagogy Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150568 (URN)10.1080/09540253.2018.1458076 (DOI)000459689800007 ()2-s2.0-85044786941 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Styrelsen for Internationellt Utvecklingssamarbete)

Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Forsberg, C. & Horton, P. (2018). A thematic analysis of students’ descriptions of bullying experiences. In: : . Paper presented at Paper presented at the 46th Congress of Nordic Educational Research Association in Oslo, Norway, 8-10 March, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A thematic analysis of students’ descriptions of bullying experiences
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145698 (URN)
Conference
Paper presented at the 46th Congress of Nordic Educational Research Association in Oslo, Norway, 8-10 March, 2018.
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Horton, P. (2018). School bullying and bare life: Challenging the state of exception. Educational Philosophy and Theory
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School bullying and bare life: Challenging the state of exception
2018 (English)In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Despite a vast amount of research into school bullying and the widespread implementation of anti-bullying policies and programs, large numbers of students continue to report that they are routinely subjected to bullying by their peers. In this theoretical article, I argue that part of the problem is that there has been a lack of critical discussion of the theoretical foundations upon which such studies are based. Drawing on recent theoretical contributions within the field of school bullying, the work of anthropologist James C. Scott, and the work of philosophers Michel Foucault and Giorgio Agamben, I take particular issue with the notion of power that has long been a foundational pillar of bullying definitions. Utilizing a Foucauldian understanding of power, I argue that rather than focusing on the power imbalance involved in bullying relations, focus instead needs to shift onto the role that bullying plays in power relations. Reimagining Agamben’s figure of homo sacer as a victim of school bullying, I consider the ways in which some individuals are reduced to bare life and forced into a state of exception whereby social laws are no longer deemed applicable. The article concludes with a discussion of how this state of exception might be challenged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
school, bullying, power, exclusion
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154056 (URN)10.1080/00131857.2018.1557043 (DOI)2-s2.0-85059085500 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Horton, P. & Forsberg, C. (2018). School cafeterias as social arenas for school bullying. In: : . Paper presented at Paper presented at the 46th Congress of Nordic Educational Research Association in Oslo, Norway, 8-10 March, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School cafeterias as social arenas for school bullying
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145699 (URN)
Conference
Paper presented at the 46th Congress of Nordic Educational Research Association in Oslo, Norway, 8-10 March, 2018.
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Horton, P. (2018). Towards a critical educational perspective on school bullying. Nordic Studies in Education, 38(4), 302-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a critical educational perspective on school bullying
2018 (English)In: Nordic Studies in Education, ISSN 1891-5914, E-ISSN 1891-5949, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 302-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This theoretical article posits a critical educational perspective on school bullying, whereby focus shifts from the individuals involved to the structural aspects of schooling. The article draws inspiration from critical pedagogy and the sociology of education to critically consider how power relations in schools relate to school bullying through a theorization of the importance of four features of schooling outlined by Duncan (2013): compulsion, compression, control, and competition. The article suggests that rather than merely studying the negative social interactions of individuals or groups of individuals, there needs to be more critical consideration of the educational context within which bullying occurs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universitetsforlaget, 2018
Keywords
Bullying, education, critical pedagogy, schooling, power, social-ecology
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154055 (URN)10.18261/issn.1891-2018-04-02 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Horton, P. (2016). Portraying monsters: framing school bullying through a macro lens. Discourse. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 37(2), 204-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Portraying monsters: framing school bullying through a macro lens
2016 (English)In: Discourse. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, ISSN 0159-6306, E-ISSN 1469-3739, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 204-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article critically considers the discourse on school bullying through the conceptual framework of lenses and argues that a macro lens has been utilised by school bullying researchers to bring into focus the characteristics of the individuals involved and the types of actions used. By considering earlier understandings of bullying, the article illustrates how this macro lens has become a metalens through which school bullying is understood. This has had implications for how bullying is understood and addressed, as well as for how vast numbers of school-aged children are perceived and treated. The article argues that the macro lens needs to be replaced with a wide-angle lens, so as to bring the social, institutional and societal contexts into view.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118668 (URN)10.1080/01596306.2014.951833 (DOI)000371016600004 ()
Available from: 2015-06-03 Created: 2015-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Horton, P. (2016). Unpacking the bullying doll: Reflections from a fieldwork at the social-ecological square. Confero, 4(1), 71-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unpacking the bullying doll: Reflections from a fieldwork at the social-ecological square
2016 (English)In: Confero, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 71-95Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127196 (URN)10.3384/confero.2001-4562.170009 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2017-04-06Bibliographically approved
Horton, P., Kvist Lindholm, S. & Nguyen, T. H. (2015). Bullying the meek: A conceptualisation of Vietnamese school bullying. Research Papers in Education, 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bullying the meek: A conceptualisation of Vietnamese school bullying
2015 (English)In: Research Papers in Education, ISSN 0267-1522, E-ISSN 1470-1146, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing on ethnographic research conducted at three lower secondary schools in the northern Vietnamese cities of Hanoi and Haiphong, this article provides a contextually nuanced conceptualisation of Vietnamese school bullying. In doing so, the article not only addresses the lack of knowledge about Vietnamese school bullying, but also poses a number of critical questions about how school bullying is more widely understood. The descriptions of school bullying provided by teachers and students in this article suggest that school bullying cannot be reduced to the negative actions and aggressive intentionality that are so often used to define it in the mainstream literature. Instead, these actions are perceived as instruments for bullying that serve a function in the social and institutional context of the school. Furthermore, the descriptions provided by teachers and students challenge the view of meekness (the passive victim) as an individual personal trait. While they suggest that students who are perceived as meek in the social context of the school are most likely to be bullied, they also highlight that some students accede to the demands of their peers in order to escape being subjected to more direct negative actions. The study thus suggests that a key for understanding the role that bullying plays in students’ day-to-day life at school is to acknowledge the function of ‘meekness’ in bullying situations and to thus place more focus on the social and institutional context within which bullying occurs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
National Category
Educational Sciences Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118669 (URN)10.1080/02671522.2015.1027728 (DOI)000361463000006 ()
Note

Funding: Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA); Vietnam National Institute for Education Sciences (VNIES)

Available from: 2015-06-03 Created: 2015-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04
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