liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Malmvall, Bo-Erik
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Hammarskjöld, F., Berg, S., Hanberger, H., Taxbro, K. & Malmvall, B.-E. (2014). Sustained low incidence of central venous catheter-related infections over six years in a Swedish hospital with an active central venous catheter team. American Journal of Infection Control, 42(2), 122-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustained low incidence of central venous catheter-related infections over six years in a Swedish hospital with an active central venous catheter team
Show others...
2014 (English)In: American Journal of Infection Control, ISSN 0196-6553, E-ISSN 1527-3296, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 122-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There are limited data on the long-term effects of implementing a central venous catheter (CVC) program for prevention of CVC infections. The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence of CVC colonization, catheter-related infections (CRI), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI), and their risk factors over a 6-year period in a hospital with an active CVC team. Methods: We conducted a continuous prospective study aiming to include all CVCs used at our hospital during the years 2004 to 2009, evaluating colonization, CRI, CRBSI, and possible risk factors. Results: A total of 2,772 CVCs was used during the study period. Data on culture results and catheterization time were available for 2,045 CVCs used in 1,674 patients. The incidences of colonization, CRI, and CRBSI were 7.0, 2.2, and 0.6 per 1,000 CVC-days, respectively. Analysis of quarterly incidences revealed 1 occasion with increasing infection rates. Catheterization time was a risk factor for CRI but not for CRBSI. Other risk factors for CRI were hemodialysis and CVC use in the internal jugular vein compared with the subclavian vein. Hemodialysis was the only risk factor for CRBSI. Conclusion: We found that a CRI prevention program led by an active CVC team and adhered to by the entire staff at a county hospital is successful in keeping CVC infections at a low rate over a long period of time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection; Intravascular catheter; Nosocomial infection; Statistical process control
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105238 (URN)10.1016/j.ajic.2013.09.023 (DOI)000330952500009 ()
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Johansson, R.-M., Malmvall, B.-E., Andersson-Gäre, B., Larsson, B., Erlandsson, I., Sund-Levander, M., . . . Christensson, L. (2013). Guidelines for preventing urinary retention and bladder damage during hospital care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(3-4), 347-355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guidelines for preventing urinary retention and bladder damage during hospital care
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 347-355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To develop evidence-based guidelines for adult patients in order to prevent urinary retention and to minimise bladder damage and urinary tract infection.

BACKGROUND:

Urinary retention causing bladder damage is a well known complication in patients during hospital care. The most common treatment for urinary retention is an indwelling urinary catheter, which causes 80% of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. Appropriate use of bladder ultrasonography can reduce the rate of bladder damage as well as the need to use an indwelling urinary catheter. It can also lead to a decrease in the rate of urinary tract infections, a lower risk of spread of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria, and lower hospital costs.

DESIGN:

An expert group was established, and a literature review was performed.

METHODS:

On the basis of literature findings and consensus in the expert group, guidelines for clinical situations were constructed.

RESULTS:

The main points of the guidelines are the following: identification of risk factors for urinary retention, managing patients at risk of urinary retention, strategies for patients with urinary retention and patient documentation and information.

CONCLUSION:

Using literature review and consensus technique based on a multiprofessional group of experts, evidence-based guidelines have been developed. Although consensus was reached, there are parts of the guidelines where the knowledge is weak.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

These guidelines are designed to be easy to use in clinical work and could be an important step towards minimising bladder damage and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections and their serious consequences, such as bacteraemia and the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria in hospitals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2013
Keywords
bladder ultrasonography, guidelines, hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, patient safety, prevention, risk of urinary retention, urinary retention
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88660 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04229.x (DOI)000313516800006 ()
Available from: 2013-02-14 Created: 2013-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hammarskjold, F., Mernelius, S., Andersson, R. E., Berg, S., Hanberger, H., Lofgren, S., . . . Matussek, A. (2013). Possible transmission of Candida albicans on an intensive care unit: genotype and temporal cluster analyses. Journal of Hospital Infection, 85(1), 60-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Possible transmission of Candida albicans on an intensive care unit: genotype and temporal cluster analyses
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Nosocomial transmission of Candida spp. has not been fully explored and previous studies have shown conflicting results. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim: To evaluate the possible nosocomial transmission of Candida spp. on an intensive care unit (ICU). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A prospective study was conducted for a period of 19 months, including all patients on our ICU with growth of Candida spp. from surveillance and directed cultures. Molecular typing with repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction was used to define genotype relationships between the Candida albicans and Candida glabrata isolates. Candida isolates obtained from blood cultures taken from patients in our county outside the ICU were used as a reference. Temporal cluster analysis was performed to evaluate genotype distribution over time. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFindings: Seventy-seven patients with 78 ICU stays, representing 12% of all ICU stays, were found to harbour 180 isolates of Candida spp. Molecular typing revealed 27 C. albicans genotypes and 10 of C. glabrata. Possible clustering, indicated by overlapping stays of patients with indistinguishable candida genotypes, was observed on seven occasions with C. albicans and on two occasions with C. glabrata. Two C. albicans genotypes were found significantly more often in the ICU group compared with the reference group. Moreover, C. albicans genotypes isolated from more than one patient were significantly more often found in the ICU group. Temporal cluster analysis revealed a significantly increased number of pairs with indistinguishable genotypes at a 21-day interval, indicating clustering. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: This study indicates possible transmission of C. albicans between ICU patients based on genotyping and temporal cluster analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WB Saunders, 2013
Keywords
Candida, Intensive care unit, Molecular typing, Nosocomial infections
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97656 (URN)10.1016/j.jhin.2013.06.002 (DOI)000323707400009 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Futurum the Academy for Health-care, Jonkoping County Council, Jonkoping, Sweden||

Available from: 2013-09-19 Created: 2013-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Makdoumi, K., Mortensen, J., Sorkhabi, O., Malmvall, B.-E. & Crafoord, S. (2012). UVA-riboflavin photochemical therapy of bacterial keratitis: a pilot study. Graefe's Archives for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 250(1), 95-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>UVA-riboflavin photochemical therapy of bacterial keratitis: a pilot study
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Graefe's Archives for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, ISSN 0721-832X, E-ISSN 1435-702X, Vol. 250, no 1, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this work as to investigate the photochemical interaction used in corneal crosslinking (CXL) as the primary therapy for bacterial keratitis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA prospective non-randomized study was conducted including 16 patients with a clinical diagnosis of bacterial keratitis. No patient had any prior antibiotic treatment for the current infection. Photography and microbial culturing of the infected cornea were performed. Riboflavin was topically administered for 20 min and ultraviolet light (UVA) exposure settings for treatment of keratoconus were used. After the procedure, clinical examinations were done at least once daily until signs of improvement had been established. The frequency of examinations was thereafter reduced. Antibiotic therapy was initiated if infectious progression was suspected. The trial was registered at ISCRTN.org (no: 21432643). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAll eyes responded to the photochemical treatment with improvement in symptoms and signs of reduced inflammation. Epithelial healing was achieved in all cases. Antibiotic administration was necessary in two cases. One patient required a human amniotic membrane transplant. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis trial illustrates that photosensitization of riboflavin using UVA at 365 nm has the potential to induce healing in patients with microbial keratitis. The results from the treatment of these 16 patients with corneal ulcers indicate that UVA-riboflavin photochemical therapy merits a controlled study in order to assess its efficacy and safety compared to antibiotics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2012
Keywords
UV, UVA, Ultraviolet, Riboflavin, CXL, Keratitis, Pilot study
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75115 (URN)10.1007/s00417-011-1754-1 (DOI)000299371000012 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|Orebro University Hospital (Sweden)|OLL-57221|Futurum, the Academy of Health Care, Jonkoping (Sweden)||Available from: 2012-02-21 Created: 2012-02-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Henningsson, A. J., Tjernberg, I., Malmvall, B.-E., Forsberg, P. & Ernerudh, J. (2011). Indications of Th1 and Th17 responses in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis: a large retrospective study. Journal of Neuroinflammation, 8(36)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indications of Th1 and Th17 responses in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis: a large retrospective study
Show others...
2011 (English)In: Journal of Neuroinflammation, ISSN 1742-2094, E-ISSN 1742-2094, Vol. 8, no 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies indicate that successful resolution of Lyme neuroborreliosis (NB) is associated with a strong T helper (Th) 1-type cytokine response in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) followed by a down-regulating Th2 response, whereas the role of the recently discovered Th17 cytokine response is unknown. Methods: To investigate the relative contribution of different Th associated cytokine/chemokine responses, we used a multiple bead array to measure the levels of CXCL10 (Th1 marker), CCL22 (Th2 marker), IL-17 (Th17 marker) and CXCL8 (general inflammation marker), in serum and in CSF from untreated patients with confirmed NB (n = 133), and non-NB patients (n = 96), and related the findings to clinical data. Samples from patients with possible early NB (n = 15) and possible late NB (n = 19) were also analysed, as well as samples from an additional control group with orthopaedic patients (n = 17), where CSF was obtained at spinal anaesthesia. Results: The most prominent differences across groups were found in the CSF. IL-17 was elevated in CSF in 49% of the patients with confirmed NB, but was not detectable in the other groups. Patients with confirmed NB and possible early NB had significantly higher CSF levels of CXCL10, CCL22 and CXCL8 compared to both the non-NB group and the control group (p andlt; 0.0001 for all comparisons). Patients in the early NB group, showing a short duration of symptoms, had lower CCL22 levels in CSF than did the confirmed NB group (p andlt; 0.0001). Furthermore, patients within the confirmed NB group showing a duration of symptoms andlt; 2 weeks, tended to have lower CCL22 levels in CSF than did those with longer symptom duration (p = 0.023). Cytokine/chemokine levels were not correlated with clinical parameters or to levels of anti-Borrelia-antibodies. Conclusion: Our results support the notion that early NB is dominated by a Th1-type response, eventually accompanied by a Th2 response. Interestingly, IL-17 was increased exclusively in CSF from patients with confirmed NB, suggesting a hitherto unknown role for Th17 in NB. However, for conclusive evidence, future prospective studies are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2011
Keywords
Lyme neuroborreliosis, cerebrospinal fluid, T helper cell, cytokine, chemokine
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69177 (URN)10.1186/1742-2094-8-36 (DOI)000291317900001 ()
Note

Original Publication: Anna J Henningsson, Ivar Tjernberg, Bo-Eric Malmvall, Pia Forsberg and Jan Ernerudh, Indications of Th1 and Th17 responses in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis: a large retrospective study, 2011, JOURNAL OF NEUROINFLAMMATION, (8), 36. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1742-2094-8-36 Licensee: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/

Available from: 2011-06-17 Created: 2011-06-17 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Hammarskjöld, F., Berg, S., Hanberger, H. & Malmvall, B.-E. (2010). Low incidence of arterial catheter infections in a Swedish intensive care unit: risk factors for colonisation and infection. Journal of Hospital Infection, 76(2), 130-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low incidence of arterial catheter infections in a Swedish intensive care unit: risk factors for colonisation and infection
2010 (English)In: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 130-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is growing concern that arterial catheters (ACs) cause catheter-related infections (CRIs). Limited data are available concerning risk factors for AC-CRI and there are no studies concerning incidence and micro-organisms from northern Europe. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of, and micro-organisms responsible for, AC colonisation and AC-CRI in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU), and to determine risk factors contributing to AC colonisation and AC-CRI. We prospectively studied all patients (N=539) receiving ACs (N=691) in a mixed ICU of a county hospital. Six hundred (87%) of all ACs were assessed completely. The total catheterisation time for 482 patients was 2567 days. The incidence of positive tip culture was 7.8 per 1000 catheter-days, with the predominant micro-organism being coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). The incidence of AC-CRI was 2.0 per 1000 catheter-days (with no cases of bacteraemia). All AC-CRIs were caused by CoNS. Multivariate analysis revealed that immunosuppression, central venous catheter (CVC) colonisation and CVC infection were significant risk factors for AC-CRI. We conclude that AC colonisation and infection with systemic symptoms occur at a low rate in our ICU which supports our practice of basic hygiene routines for the prevention of AC-CRI. Colonisation and infection of a simultaneous CVC seem to be risk factors. The role of contemporaneous colonisation and infection of multiple bloodstream catheters has received little attention previously. Further studies are needed to verify the significance of this finding.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59067 (URN)10.1016/j.jhin.2010.05.021 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-09-08 Created: 2010-09-08 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Henningsson, A. J., Malmvall, B.-E., Ernerudh, J., Matussek, A. & Forsberg, P. (2010). Neuroborreliosis-an epidemiological, clinical and healthcare cost study from an endemic area in the south-east of Sweden. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 16(8), 1245-1251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuroborreliosis-an epidemiological, clinical and healthcare cost study from an endemic area in the south-east of Sweden
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, ISSN 1198-743X, E-ISSN 1469-0691, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1245-1251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied retrospectively the medical records of all patients (n = 150) diagnosed, by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, with neuroborreliosis (NB) in Jonkoping County, Sweden during 2000-2005. The number of NB cases increased from 5/100 000 to 10/100 000 inhabitants/year. In 17% of the patients, anti-Borrelia antibodies were found in CSF but not in serum at the time of diagnosis. Facial palsy, headache and fever were frequent manifestations in children, whereas unspecific muscle and joint pain were the most commonly reported symptoms in older patients. Post-treatment symptoms persisting for more than 6 months occurred in 13%, and the patients concerned were significantly older, had longer-lasting symptoms prior to treatment, had higher levels of Borrelia-specific IgG in CSF, and more often had radiculitis. The total cost of NB-related healthcare was estimated to be euro500 000 for the entire study group (euro3300 per patient), and the cost of social benefits was estimated to be euro134 000 (euro2000 per patient). CSF analysis is necessary for the diagnosis of NB, because some patients develop antibodies in serum later than in CSF. Early diagnosis of borreliosis would result in reduced human suffering and in economic gain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2010
Keywords
Clinical, epidemiology, healthcare economy, Lyme disease, neuroborreliosis
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58536 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-0691.2009.03059.x (DOI)000280359900034 ()
Note
This is the pre-reviewed version of the following article: A J Henningsson, Bo-Eric Malmvall, Jan Ernerudh, A Matussek and Pia Forsberg, Neuroborreliosis-an epidemiological, clinical and healthcare cost study from an endemic area in the south-east of Sweden, 2010, CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND INFECTION, (16), 8, 1245-1251. which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2009.03059.x Copyright: Blackwell Publishing Ltd http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Brand/id-35.html Available from: 2010-08-13 Created: 2010-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Malmvall, B.-E., Mölstad, S., Darelid, J., Hiselius, A., Larsson, L., Swanberg, J. & Åbom, P.-E. (2007). Reduction of antibiotics sales and sustained low incidence of bacterial resistance: report on a broad approach during 10 years to implement evidence-based indications for antibiotic prescribing in Jönköping County, Sweden. Quality Management in Health Care, 16(1), 60-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduction of antibiotics sales and sustained low incidence of bacterial resistance: report on a broad approach during 10 years to implement evidence-based indications for antibiotic prescribing in Jönköping County, Sweden
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 60-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Increased prevalence of resistance in major pathogens decreases the possibility to treat common infectious conditions. In the beginning of the 1990s, resistant pneumococci spread among children in southern Sweden, which alarmed both the profession and the medical authorities. We describe the measures taken to curb the spread of resistance and to reduce the use of antibiotics in outpatient care.

Method: A national organization, Strama (Swedish Strategic Programme for the Rational Use of Antimicrobial Agents and Surveillance of Resistance), was initiated in 1994 and a regional committee was formed in Jönköping County in 1995. A multifaceted program was started aiming at reducing antibiotic use in the county by 25% and that the prevalence of resistant pneumococci should not increase.

Results: The efforts by the Jönköping County committee has resulted in a 31% total reduction of the consumption of antibiotic drugs in primary care between 1993 and 2005 and a 50% reduction among children aged 0 to 4 years. There has been no increase in the prevalence of resistant pneumococci or Haemophilus influenzae in the county. The decrease in antibiotic use was greater than the average in Sweden.

Conclusion: Our regional efforts have been successful. This has probably been achieved by a sustained strategy including repeated campaigns in the media, information to the profession, implementation of guidelines, and feedback to the profession on data on antibiotic prescribing and resistance. We believe it is of outmost importance not only to inform the profession but also the public on the limited effects of antibiotics in most respiratory tract infections.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41442 (URN)17235252 (PubMedID)56573 (Local ID)56573 (Archive number)56573 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Hammarskjold, F., Wallen, G. & Malmvall, B.-E. (2006). Central venous catheter infections at a county hospital in Sweden: A prospective analysis of colonization, incidence of infection and risk factors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 50(4), 451-460
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Central venous catheter infections at a county hospital in Sweden: A prospective analysis of colonization, incidence of infection and risk factors
2006 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 451-460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Catheter-related infection (CRI) is one of the most serious complications of the use of central venous catheters (CVCs), with an incidence of 2-30/1000 days in different studies. No major prospective study has evaluated the rate of CRI in Scandinavia. Since 1999, we have had a thorough programme for the insertion and care of all CVCs used at our hospital and its outpatient clinics. The purpose of this survey was to study the incidence of catheter tip colonization and CRI and their risk factors, and to compare these data with previous non-Scandinavian studies. Methods: We studied prospectively 605 CVCs in 456 patients in relation to insertion data, patient and catheter characteristics, catheterization time and microbiological cultures. Risk factors were analysed by multivariate analysis. Results: Four hundred and ninety-five (82%) of all CVCs were assessed completely. The total catheterization time was 9010 days. The incidence of positive tip culture was 7.66/1000 days, and the predominant microorganism was coagulase-negative staphylococci. The incidence of CRI was 1.55/1000 days, and the only significant risk factor was the duration of catheterization with a relative risk of 1.009 per day [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.003-1.015]. Of the 14 cases with CRI, six were associated with candida species, and five of these were diagnosed in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: In comparison with non-Scandinavian studies, our practice of strict basic hygiene routines for CVC insertion and care is associated with a low incidence of CRI. However, there was a high proportion of candida species amongst these infections. The only risk factor for CRI was the duration of catheterization. © Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 2006.

Keywords
Candida species, Catheter-related infection, Central venous catheter (CVC), Nosocomial infection
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50078 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2006.00974.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Hammarskjöld, F., Mernelius, S., Andersson, R., Hanberger, H., Löfgren, S., Malmvall, B.-E., . . . Matussek, A.Possible transmission of Candida albicans on an intensive care unit: intensive care unit:.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Possible transmission of Candida albicans on an intensive care unit: intensive care unit:
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Nosocomial transmission of Candida spp. has not fully been explored and previous studies have shown conflicting results.

Aim: To evaluate the possible nosocomial transmission of Candida spp. on an intensive care unit (ICU).

Methods: We conducted a prospective study over 19 month, including all patients on our ICU with growth of Candida spp. from surveillance and directed cultures. Molecular typing, with rep-PCR (DiversiLab) was used to define genotype relationships between the C. albicans and C. glabrata isolates. Candida isolates obtained from blood cultures taken from patients in our county outside the ICU, were used as a reference. Temporal cluster analysis was performed to evaluate genotype distribution over time.

Findings: Seventy-seven patients with 78 ICU stays, representing twelve per cent of all ICU stays, were found to harbour 180 isolates of Candida spp. Molecular typing revealed 27 C. albicans genotypes and ten of C. glabrata. Possible clustering, indicated by overlapping stays of patients with indistinguishable candida genotypes was observed on seven occasions with C. albicans and on two occasions with C. glabrata. Two C. albicans genotypes were found significantly more often in the ICU group compared to the reference group. Moreover, C. albicans genotypes isolated from more than one patient were significantly more often found in the ICU group. Temporal cluster analysis revealed a significantly increased number of pairs with indistinguishable genotypes at a 21-dayinterval, indicating clustering.

Conclusion: This study indicates transmission of C. albicans between ICU patients based on genotyping and temporal cluster analysis.

Keywords
Candida, Molecular typing, Intensive care unit, nosocomial infections
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89953 (URN)
Available from: 2013-03-12 Created: 2013-03-12 Last updated: 2013-03-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications