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Koc-Januchta, M., Schönborn, K., Tibell, L., Chaudhri, V. K. & Heller, H. C. (2020). Engaging With Biology by Asking Questions: Investigating Students’ Interaction and Learning With an Artificial Intelligence-Enriched Textbook. Journal of educational computing research (Print)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engaging With Biology by Asking Questions: Investigating Students’ Interaction and Learning With an Artificial Intelligence-Enriched Textbook
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2020 (English)In: Journal of educational computing research (Print), ISSN 0735-6331, E-ISSN 1541-4140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Applying artificial intelligence (AI) to support science learning is a prominent aspect of the digital education revolution. This study investigates students’ interaction and learning with an AI book, which enables the inputting of questions and receiving of suggested questions to understand biology, in comparison with a traditional E-book. Students (n = 16) in a tertiary biology course engaged with the topics of energy in cells and cell signaling. The AI book group (n = 6) interacted with the AI book first followed by the E-book, while the E-book group (n = 10) did so in reverse. Students responded to pre-/posttests and to cognitive load, motivation, and usability questionnaires; and three students were interviewed. All interactions with the books were automatically logged. Results revealed a learning gain and a similar pattern of feature use across both books. Nevertheless, asking questions with the AI book was associated with higher retention and correlated positively with viewing visual representations more often. Students with a higher intrinsic motivation to know and to experience stimulation perceived book usability more favorably. Interviews revealed that posing and receiving suggested questions was helpful, while ideas for future development included more personalized feedback. Future research shall explore how learning can be benefitted with the AI-enriched book.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
digital textbooks, artificial intelligence, biology learning, motivation, usability, cognitive load
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-165608 (URN)10.1177/0735633120921581 (DOI)
Funder
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2014.0107
Available from: 2020-05-08 Created: 2020-05-08 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Otterborn, A., Schönborn, K. & Hultén, M. (2020). Investigating Preschool Educators’ Implementation of Computer Programming in Their Teaching Practice. Early Childhood Education Journal, 48(3), 253-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating Preschool Educators’ Implementation of Computer Programming in Their Teaching Practice
2020 (English)In: Early Childhood Education Journal, ISSN 1082-3301, E-ISSN 1573-1707, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 253-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Modern preschool education is seen as an essential foundation for nurturing children’s digital literacy. Early childhood education environments have witnessed increased emphasis on integrating programming activities in combination with digital tablets. However, little is known about how preschool teachers implement programming as part of pedagogical strategies during practice. In Sweden, although there is a mandate to develop children’s understanding of the digital world, programming is not formally mentioned in the revised preschool curriculum. This study systematically investigates how Swedish preschool teachers implement programming activities in their teaching practice. Data was collected through a national online survey (n = 199). Findings revealed a range of apps and resources used in combination with tablets, where activity integration takes place as unplugged programming, digital programming, or as a combination of the former. Teachers markedly attributed intended learning goals around programming to tenets of computational thinking and “twenty-first century skills”. Moreover, programming was often actively linked to learning in other domains such as science, technology, mathematics, and language, approaches that show traditional Swedish preschool teaching practices being recontextualized in terms of programming. Based on the reported findings that provide insight into the implementation of programming in preschools, a logical future research avenue lies in exploring the documented programming activities from the perspective of the children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2020
Keywords
Programming, Digital tablets, Swedish preschool, Technology education, Science education, iPads
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161952 (URN)10.1007/s10643-019-00976-y (DOI)000520706400001 ()2-s2.0-85073922147 (Scopus ID)
Note

"Open Access: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made."

Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2020-04-08Bibliographically approved
Höst, G., Lundin Palmerius, K. & Schönborn, K. (2020). Nano for the Public: An Exploranation Perspective. IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 40(2), 32-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nano for the Public: An Exploranation Perspective
2020 (English)In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Public understanding of contemporary scientific issues is critical for the future of society. Public spaces, such as science centers, can impact the communication of science by providing active knowledge-building experiences of scientific phenomena. In contributing to this vision, we have previously developed an interactive visualization as part of a public exhibition about nano. We reflect on how the immersive design and features of the exhibit contribute as a tool for science communication in light of the emerging paradigm of exploranation, and offer some forward-looking perspectives about what this notion has to offer the domain.

Keywords
E-learning tools; Learning Technologies; Devices for learning; Learning Technologies; Artificial, augmented, and virtual realities; Multimedia Information Systems; Information Interfaces and Representation (HCI); H Information Technology and Systems; Educational simulations; Learning environments; Learning Technologies; Applications; Simulation, Modeling, and Visualization; Computing Methodologies
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164020 (URN)10.1109/MCG.2020.2973120 (DOI)000519541800005 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsradet)Swedish Research Council [2011-5569]; Norrkoping Visualization Center C (NVAB); NanoForm project organization

Available from: 2020-03-02 Created: 2020-03-02 Last updated: 2020-04-08Bibliographically approved
Flint, J., Lundin Palmerius, K., Höst, G. & Schönborn, K. (2020). Virtual Worlds for Learning. CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual Worlds for Learning
2020 (English)Data set
Place, publisher, year
CRC Press, 2020
National Category
Nano Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163527 (URN)
Available from: 2020-02-07 Created: 2020-02-07 Last updated: 2020-02-07Bibliographically approved
Koc-Januchta, M., Schönborn, K., Tibell, L. A. E., Chaudhri, V. K. & Heller, H. C. (2019). Asking questions to engage with biology: Investigating students’ interaction and learning with an AI-based textbook. In: : . Paper presented at Conference of European Science Education Research Association (ESERA).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asking questions to engage with biology: Investigating students’ interaction and learning with an AI-based textbook
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2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161930 (URN)
Conference
Conference of European Science Education Research Association (ESERA)
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-13
Hallström, J. & Schönborn, K. (2019). Commentary: Models and modelling for authentic STEM education: reinforcing the argument. International Journal of STEM education, 6, Article ID UNSP 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary: Models and modelling for authentic STEM education: reinforcing the argument
2019 (English)In: International Journal of STEM education, E-ISSN 2196-7822, Vol. 6, article id UNSP 22Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This commentary expands the notion that models and modelling can be used as a basis to foster an integrated and authentic STEM education and STEM literacy. The aim is to synthesize key publications that document relationships between authenticity, models and modelling, and STEM education. The implications of the synthesis are as follows: authenticity must be viewed as a cornerstone of STEM literacy; models and modelling processes can bridge the gap between STEM disciplines through authentic practices; models and modelling should be used as a means to promote STEM literacy and the transfer of knowledge and skills between contexts, both in and out of the STEM disciplines; modelling activities can serve as a meaningful route toward authentic STEM education; teaching authentic modelling processes must be rooted in explicit and tested frameworks that are based on the practice of the STEM disciplines; and, authentic STEM education should be driven by developing interaction between STEM subjects in parallel with maintaining the integrity of each subject. If this vision is to be reinforced, it is of utmost importance that implementing any model-based authentic educational activities are underpinned by evidence-based frameworks and recommendations for teaching practice. It is therefore imperative that intended model-based pedagogies for STEM education classrooms are further researched, in order to contribute to an integrated STEM literacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Authenticity; Models; Modelling; STEM education; STEM literacy
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158962 (URN)10.1186/s40594-019-0178-z (DOI)000473212800001 ()
Available from: 2019-07-19 Created: 2019-07-19 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Larsson, A., Stafstedt, M. & Schönborn, K. (2019). Heat Angels and Paper Cups: Pupils’ Use of Metaphoric Relations When Engaging Thermal Cameras to Investigate Heat. In: McLoughlin E., Finlayson O., Erduran S., Childs P. (Ed.), Bridging Research and Practice in Science Education. Contributions from Science Education Research, vol 6.: (pp. 74-89). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heat Angels and Paper Cups: Pupils’ Use of Metaphoric Relations When Engaging Thermal Cameras to Investigate Heat
2019 (English)In: Bridging Research and Practice in Science Education. Contributions from Science Education Research, vol 6. / [ed] McLoughlin E., Finlayson O., Erduran S., Childs P., Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 74-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Thermal science is a perennial obstacle for learners. Infrared camera technology provides an opportunity for pupils to confront challenging thermal ideas. From an embodied cognition perspective, sensory experiences form metaphoric relations that underpin conceptualisation and reasoning about abstract scientific phenomena. This study investigated eight groups of fourth grade pupils’ use of metaphoric relations when engaging thermal cameras to explore “heat” at a science centre. Pupils were videorecorded while collaboratively exploring thermal properties of the surroundings and during a thermos modelling exercise. Qualitative metaphor analyses of pupils’ dialogue and behaviour revealed various metaphoric and metonymic relations around spatial properties, colour, movement and change in their conceptualisation of thermal phenomena. “Heat” was almost exclusively conceptualised as a noun, manifested in utterances such as “harder for the heat to escape” and “it wants to get yellow”. In addition, pupils used colour as both a metonym and metaphor for heat and temperature. Expressions of heat as an entity were closely related to experiences of movement, indicating that spatial cognition is central to children’s conceptualisation of heat. Engagement with the cameras provided access to thermodynamic phenomena through unique sensory and nonsensory experiences. Future research will explore how these metaphoric relations can be exploited as a meaning-making resource in the classroom.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019
Series
Contributions from Science Education Research ; 6
Keywords
Collaborative tasks, Heat, Metonym, Metaphor, Thermal cameras, Thermal phenomena, Understanding
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161956 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-17219-0_5 (DOI)9783030172183 (ISBN)9783030172190 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Otterborn, A., Schönborn, K. & Hultén, M. (2019). Surveying preschool teachers’ use of digital tablets: general and technology education related findings. International journal of technology and design education, 29(4), 717-737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surveying preschool teachers’ use of digital tablets: general and technology education related findings
2019 (English)In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 717-737Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The availability of digital tablets in preschools has increased significantly in recent years. Literature suggests that these tools can enhance students’ literacy and collaborative skills. As society becomes increasingly digitized, preschool curriculum reform also emphasises the subjects of technology and science as priority areas of learning. Teachers’ knowledge and experiences are of utmost importance in carrying out this mandate. Few studies have explored the use of digital tablets to teach preschool technology and science in Sweden, and there is an urgent need to ascertain the role of digital aids as teaching tools. This survey study seeks to determine how digital tablets are used to support preschool children’s learning in general, and with respect to technology education. Preschool educators (n = 327) across Sweden responded to an online survey consisting of 20 closed and 6 open items that probed the use of digital tablets. Survey results revealed a high degree of engagement with digital tablets in preschools, with activities directed toward various subject-related, social and generic skills. Programming, invention, construction and creation, problem-solving, and design emerged saliently as tablet activities in technology subject areas. Opportunities for providing meaningful learning tasks and digital adaptability were seen as pedagogical benefits of using tablets, but increasing expectations to integrate tablet activities with an accompanying lack of digital skills were expressed as limitations. Teachers’ recommendations for future tablet use included defining clearer curriculum guidelines for tablet implementation and adequate training for acquiring digital competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Digital tablets Swedish preschool Technology education iPads
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151668 (URN)10.1007/s10798-018-9469-9 (DOI)000483645100006 ()
Available from: 2018-09-28 Created: 2018-09-28 Last updated: 2019-09-23
Svärd, J., Schönborn, K. & Hallström, J. (2018). Connecting Authentic Innovation Activities to the Design Process. In: Niall Seery, Jeffrey Buckley, Donal Canty & Joseph Phelan (Ed.), 2018 PATT36 International Conference, Research and Practice in Technology Education: Perspectives on Human Capacity and Development: . Paper presented at 36th International Pupils’ Attitudes Towards Technology Conference, Athlone , Ireland, 18–21 June, 2018. (pp. 216-222). Athlone, Ireland
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connecting Authentic Innovation Activities to the Design Process
2018 (English)In: 2018 PATT36 International Conference, Research and Practice in Technology Education: Perspectives on Human Capacity and Development / [ed] Niall Seery, Jeffrey Buckley, Donal Canty & Joseph Phelan, Athlone, Ireland, 2018, p. 216-222Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although history is full of inventors and innovations, principles underpinning the design (or innovation) process were only first described in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Beckman and Barry (2007) connect the design process to learning by experience, a process linked to experiential learning, and a forerunner of authentic learning. This study concerns an authentic innovation project, in which 13 groups of upper secondary school students (aged 16–17 years) solved real-world problems of their choice. The five-week innovation project offered students possibilities to think, design, discuss and reflect. The specific aim of this study is to present and analyse the activities that took place at different stages of the innovation/design process by posing the following research question: Do the students taking part in the innovation project engage one or more phases of the design process? Our results suggest that students with little or no previous experience of innovating or designing, not only solve the tasks they set out to solve, but also do so in a manner that mimics the way a trained inventor might work. These observations are closely associated with the learning models described by Beckman and Barry, and have implications for the teaching of design and innovation processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athlone, Ireland: , 2018
Keywords
Authentic learning, Innovation project, Upper secondary school, Design process
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149069 (URN)978-1-5272-2507-7 (ISBN)978-1-5272-2508-4 (ISBN)
Conference
36th International Pupils’ Attitudes Towards Technology Conference, Athlone , Ireland, 18–21 June, 2018.
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Dolo, G., Haglund, J. & Schönborn, K. (2018). Thermal Cameras as a Semiotic Resource for Inquiry in a South African Township School Context. Designs for Learning, 10(1), 123-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermal Cameras as a Semiotic Resource for Inquiry in a South African Township School Context
2018 (English)In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inquiry-based approaches to science education are central to recent South African primary and secondary school curricula, but have been found challenging to adopt in disadvantaged township contexts. It is therefore important to find ways of introducing inquiry-based approaches, where pupils are encouraged to investigate phenomena they are interested in and to engage in true dialogue, as opposed to teacher-led triadic dialogue. We typically experience thermal phenomena through the sense of touch, but infrared (IR) cameras provide an additional opportunity to experience heat-related phenomena through the visual sense. Previously, in a Swedish context, we have found that hand-held IR cameras allow for strong pedagogical affordances and inspire pupils to engage in inquiry in the area of thermal science. In the present case study, grade 7 and 8 pupils (13–14 years old) in two South African township schools were introduced to IR cameras during predict-observe-explain (POE) exercises on heat conduction. The results revealed that if pupils had a sufficient conceptual understanding of heat conduction beforehand, they were capable of engaging in true dialogue in relation to the exercises and interpreting the thermal camera visual imagery. However, if pupils did not show such understanding, it was tempting for them and the facilitator to resort to triadic dialogue.

Keywords
science education, thermal cameras, heat conduction, township schools
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161955 (URN)10.16993/dfl.96 (DOI)
Note

"This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/."

Available from: 2019-11-14 Created: 2019-11-14 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8888-6843

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