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Hallström, J. & Schönborn, K. (2019). Commentary: Models and modelling for authentic STEM education: reinforcing the argument. International Journal of STEM education, 6, Article ID UNSP 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary: Models and modelling for authentic STEM education: reinforcing the argument
2019 (English)In: International Journal of STEM education, E-ISSN 2196-7822, Vol. 6, article id UNSP 22Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This commentary expands the notion that models and modelling can be used as a basis to foster an integrated and authentic STEM education and STEM literacy. The aim is to synthesize key publications that document relationships between authenticity, models and modelling, and STEM education. The implications of the synthesis are as follows: authenticity must be viewed as a cornerstone of STEM literacy; models and modelling processes can bridge the gap between STEM disciplines through authentic practices; models and modelling should be used as a means to promote STEM literacy and the transfer of knowledge and skills between contexts, both in and out of the STEM disciplines; modelling activities can serve as a meaningful route toward authentic STEM education; teaching authentic modelling processes must be rooted in explicit and tested frameworks that are based on the practice of the STEM disciplines; and, authentic STEM education should be driven by developing interaction between STEM subjects in parallel with maintaining the integrity of each subject. If this vision is to be reinforced, it is of utmost importance that implementing any model-based authentic educational activities are underpinned by evidence-based frameworks and recommendations for teaching practice. It is therefore imperative that intended model-based pedagogies for STEM education classrooms are further researched, in order to contribute to an integrated STEM literacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Authenticity; Models; Modelling; STEM education; STEM literacy
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158962 (URN)10.1186/s40594-019-0178-z (DOI)000473212800001 ()
Available from: 2019-07-19 Created: 2019-07-19 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved
Svärd, J., Schönborn, K. & Hallström, J. (2018). Connecting Authentic Innovation Activities to the Design Process. In: Niall Seery, Jeffrey Buckley, Donal Canty & Joseph Phelan (Ed.), 2018 PATT36 International Conference, Research and Practice in Technology Education: Perspectives on Human Capacity and Development: . Paper presented at 36th International Pupils’ Attitudes Towards Technology Conference, Athlone , Ireland, 18–21 June, 2018. (pp. 216-222). Athlone, Ireland
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connecting Authentic Innovation Activities to the Design Process
2018 (English)In: 2018 PATT36 International Conference, Research and Practice in Technology Education: Perspectives on Human Capacity and Development / [ed] Niall Seery, Jeffrey Buckley, Donal Canty & Joseph Phelan, Athlone, Ireland, 2018, p. 216-222Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although history is full of inventors and innovations, principles underpinning the design (or innovation) process were only first described in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Beckman and Barry (2007) connect the design process to learning by experience, a process linked to experiential learning, and a forerunner of authentic learning. This study concerns an authentic innovation project, in which 13 groups of upper secondary school students (aged 16–17 years) solved real-world problems of their choice. The five-week innovation project offered students possibilities to think, design, discuss and reflect. The specific aim of this study is to present and analyse the activities that took place at different stages of the innovation/design process by posing the following research question: Do the students taking part in the innovation project engage one or more phases of the design process? Our results suggest that students with little or no previous experience of innovating or designing, not only solve the tasks they set out to solve, but also do so in a manner that mimics the way a trained inventor might work. These observations are closely associated with the learning models described by Beckman and Barry, and have implications for the teaching of design and innovation processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athlone, Ireland: , 2018
Keywords
Authentic learning, Innovation project, Upper secondary school, Design process
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149069 (URN)978-1-5272-2507-7 (ISBN)978-1-5272-2508-4 (ISBN)
Conference
36th International Pupils’ Attitudes Towards Technology Conference, Athlone , Ireland, 18–21 June, 2018.
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Otterborn, A., Schönborn, K. & Hultén, M. (2018). Surveying preschool teachers’ use of digital tablets: general and technology education related findings. International journal of technology and design education
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surveying preschool teachers’ use of digital tablets: general and technology education related findings
2018 (English)In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The availability of digital tablets in preschools has increased significantly in recent years. Literature suggests that these tools can enhance students’ literacy and collaborative skills. As society becomes increasingly digitized, preschool curriculum reform also emphasises the subjects of technology and science as priority areas of learning. Teachers’ knowledge and experiences are of utmost importance in carrying out this mandate. Few studies have explored the use of digital tablets to teach preschool technology and science in Sweden, and there is an urgent need to ascertain the role of digital aids as teaching tools. This survey study seeks to determine how digital tablets are used to support preschool children’s learning in general, and with respect to technology education. Preschool educators (n = 327) across Sweden responded to an online survey consisting of 20 closed and 6 open items that probed the use of digital tablets. Survey results revealed a high degree of engagement with digital tablets in preschools, with activities directed toward various subject-related, social and generic skills. Programming, invention, construction and creation, problem-solving, and design emerged saliently as tablet activities in technology subject areas. Opportunities for providing meaningful learning tasks and digital adaptability were seen as pedagogical benefits of using tablets, but increasing expectations to integrate tablet activities with an accompanying lack of digital skills were expressed as limitations. Teachers’ recommendations for future tablet use included defining clearer curriculum guidelines for tablet implementation and adequate training for acquiring digital competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Digital tablets Swedish preschool Technology education iPads
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151668 (URN)10.1007/s10798-018-9469-9 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-28 Created: 2018-09-28 Last updated: 2018-09-28
Höst, G., Schönborn, K., Tibell, L. & Fröcklin, H. (2018). What Biological Visualizations Do Science CenterVisitors Prefer in an Interactive Touch Table?. Education Sciences, 8(4), Article ID 166.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Biological Visualizations Do Science CenterVisitors Prefer in an Interactive Touch Table?
2018 (English)In: Education Sciences, ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hands-on digital interactivity in science centers provides new communicative opportunities. The Microcosmos multi-touch table allows visitors to interact with 64 image “cards” of (sub)microscopic biological structures and processes embedded across seven theme categories. This study presents the integration of biological content, interactive features and logging capabilities into the table, and analyses visitors’ usage and preferences. Data logging recorded 2,070,350 events including activated category, selected card, and various finger-based gestures. Visitors interacted with all cards during 858 sessions (96 s on average). Finger movements covered an average accumulated distance of 4.6 m per session, and about 56% of card interactions involved two fingers. Visitors made 5.53 category switches per session on average, and the virus category was most activated (average 0.96 per session). An overall ranking score related to card attractive power and holding power revealed that six of the most highly used cards depicted viruses and four were colourful instrument output images. The large finger traversal distance and proportion of two-finger card interaction may indicate the intuitiveness of the gestures. Observed trends in visitor engagement with the biological visualizations are considered in terms of construal level theory. Future work will examine how interactions are related to potential learning of biological content.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: , 2018
Keywords
visualization in biology education; (sub)microscopic scale; digital touch table interfaces; science centers
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151994 (URN)10.3390/educsci8040166 (DOI)
Projects
Norrköpings fond för Forskning och Utveckling NK KS 2016/0417
Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2018-11-12
Svärd, J., Schönborn, K. & Hallström, J. (2017). Design of an authentic innovation project in Swedish upper secondary technology education. Australasian Journal of Technology Education, 4, 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design of an authentic innovation project in Swedish upper secondary technology education
2017 (English)In: Australasian Journal of Technology Education, ISSN 2382-2007, Vol. 4, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent studies on the Swedish work force show that about half of all jobs demand a high degree of self-governing. In preparing students for the future, the World Economic Forum suggests that schools should also teach social skills, creativity and critical thinking. According to the Swedish upper secondary curriculum, the subject of technology should allow students to develop entrepreneurial skills, defined as supporting curiosity, confidence, creativity and courage, resulting in the ability to act, in innovation and problem solving. This vision is related to the notion of authentic learning. Reeves, Herrington and Oliver define authenticity through nine key elements, namely, authentic context, authentic task, presence of expert performances, multiple perspectives, collaboration, reflection, articulation, metacognitive support and authentic assessment. The aim of this study is to map these key elements of authentic learning onto the development and design of a five-week innovation project for implementation in a Swedish upper secondary school context. The mapping process involved first synthesising literature in the area of authentic learning in conjunction with studying Swedish technology education curriculum materials. This was followed by describing the characteristics of each key element of authentic learning in terms of proposing activities for implementation as an innovation project (IP). The results of this study show how criteria of nine elements of authentic learning could be used in designing an innovation project (IP) module in an authentically cogent way. Thus the authenticity framework served as a valid theoretical tool to produce the authentic learning module.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Waikato, NZ: University of Waikato, 2017
Keywords
authentic learning; Swedish upper secondary education; technology education; module; entrepreneurial skills; 21st century skills
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141549 (URN)10.15663/ajte.v4i1.48 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-29 Created: 2017-09-29 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Svärd, J., Schönborn, K. & Hallström, J. (2017). Does Authentic Learning Work?: Evaluating an Innovation Project in Upper Secondary Technology Education in Sweden. In: PATT 34, Technology & Engineering Education: Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around the Globe: . Paper presented at PATT, Pupils' Attitudes Towards Technology, Philadelphia, 10-14 July, 2017 (pp. 1-12). Millersville, PA
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Authentic Learning Work?: Evaluating an Innovation Project in Upper Secondary Technology Education in Sweden
2017 (English)In: PATT 34, Technology & Engineering Education: Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around the Globe, Millersville, PA, 2017, p. 1-12Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Creativity is widely viewed as a key component of human development. Creativity is part of the “21st century skills” movement as well as a cornerstone of the technology subject in the Swedish school system. Could authentic learning, as described by Herrington, Reeves and Oliver, be one way to promote creativity? In a pilot study conducted in 2016, 13 groups of upper secondary students participated in a five-week authentic innovation project where they cooperated in the design of solutions for real-world problems. This approach mirrors Brown, Collins and Duguid’s statement that in order to learn a subject, students need more than abilities that focus on acquiring abstract concepts; they need to use and apply conceptual tools while performing authentic activities. The outcome of the innovation project was displayed and presented at an exhibition where professional inventors provided feedback on students’ created solutions. This paper presents results from the pilot study as well as preliminary findings from a main study, involving 25 groups, currently underway. Data from the pilot study was collected through questionnaires after each lesson, following the five-week module, and at the end of the entire course, as well as through semi-structured interviews with nine students. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students perceived the project as being authentic, and departed the course with an increased sense of comprehension and understanding. Future studies will explore learning activity within groups, and differences between students’ and teachers’ understanding of authenticity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Millersville, PA: , 2017
Keywords
Technology education, Upper secondary school, Authentic learning, Innovation
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139789 (URN)
Conference
PATT, Pupils' Attitudes Towards Technology, Philadelphia, 10-14 July, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2017-08-17Bibliographically approved
Otterborn, A., Schönborn, K. & Hultén, M. (2017). Exploring the use of digital tablets in preschool technology and science education. In: PATT 34, Technology & Engineering Education: Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around the Globe, Millersville, PA, 2017: . Paper presented at PATT, Pupils' Attitudes Towards Technology, Philadelphia, 10-14 July 2017. Philadelphia, PA, USA
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the use of digital tablets in preschool technology and science education
2017 (English)In: PATT 34, Technology & Engineering Education: Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around the Globe, Millersville, PA, 2017, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The availability of digital tablets in preschools has increased significantly in recent years. Literature suggests that these tools can enhance students’ literacy skills, as well as improve student collaboration. Society is becoming increasingly digitized and the Swedish preschool curriculum includes technology and science as priority areas of learning. Preschool teachers’ knowledge is of utmost importance in helping carrying out this mandate. Since there have been few studies on the use of digital tablets in preschool technology and science education in a Swedish context, there is an urgent need to explore the role and influence of digital tools as teaching tools, in an effort to exploit the potential pedagogical opportunities offered by digital technology. The current study investigates what features and aspects of digital tablet technology preschool teachers use to teach technology and science in preschools. Preschool educators throughout Sweden responded to an online survey consisting of 20 closed and 6 open items that probed teachers’ use of digital tablets. Results show that programming, invention, construction, creation, entrepreneurship and designing with the support of digital tablets are emerging technology education activities in preschool. This finding is in line with a revised Swedish curriculum to be completed in 2018. Teacher scaffolding in conjunction with different digital tablet applications could help to develop children’s ability and confidence to invent, program, create and design. Future work will consist of conducting interviews with preschool teachers to obtain a deeper understanding of the themes that emerged from the survey.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA, USA: , 2017
Keywords
Digital tablets, preschool, technology education, science education, iPads, digital tools, educational technology
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139468 (URN)
Conference
PATT, Pupils' Attitudes Towards Technology, Philadelphia, 10-14 July 2017
Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2017-08-16Bibliographically approved
Svärd, J., Schönborn, K. & Hallström, J. (2016). Designing a module for authentic learning in upper secondary technology education. In: Marc J. de Vries, Arien Bekker-Holtland, Gerald van Dijk (Ed.), PATT-32 Proceedings Technology Education for 21st Century Skills: Utrecht, The Netherlands, August 2016. Paper presented at PATT-32, Technology Education for 21st Century Skills, Utrecht, The Netherlands, August 23-26, 2016 (pp. 454-462). Utrecht, The Netherlands: University of Applied Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing a module for authentic learning in upper secondary technology education
2016 (English)In: PATT-32 Proceedings Technology Education for 21st Century Skills: Utrecht, The Netherlands, August 2016 / [ed] Marc J. de Vries, Arien Bekker-Holtland, Gerald van Dijk, Utrecht, The Netherlands: University of Applied Sciences , 2016, p. 454-462Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

According to the Swedish upper secondary curriculum (Skolverket, n.d.), the subject of technology should allow students to develop entrepreneurial skills, defined as supporting curiosity, confidence, creativity and courage, resulting in the ability to act, in innovation and problem solving. Beghetto and Kaufman’s (2014) view of creative learning includes, “having students identify a need and work collaboratively with each other and outside experts to develop a creative solution for that need will help them creatively and meaningfully use what they have learned in the classroom” (p. 65). This kind of learning is related to the notion of authentic learning. Herrington and Parker (2013) define authenticity by nine key elements, namely, authentic context, authentic task, presence of expert performances, multiple perspectives, collaboration, reflection, articulation, metacognitive support and authentic assessment. The aim of this study is to map key elements of authentic learning onto the development of a five-week innovation project for implementation in a Swedish upper secondary school context. Following design and a first round of module implementation, a subsequent pilot study has deployed written questionnaire and semi-structured interview methods to investigate students’ opinions of the authenticity of the module and its outcomes. The paper also presents some early findings from this pilot study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Utrecht, The Netherlands: University of Applied Sciences, 2016
Series
PATT Proceedings, ISSN 2542-3592 ; 32
Keywords
upper secondary education, technology education, authenticity, module, Sweden, pilot study
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133068 (URN)
Conference
PATT-32, Technology Education for 21st Century Skills, Utrecht, The Netherlands, August 23-26, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Schönborn, K., Höst, G., Lundin Palmerius, K. & Flint, J. (2016). Development of an interactive immersion environment for engendering understanding about nanotechnology: concept, construction, and implementation. In: M. Khosrow-Pour (Ed.), Web Design and Development: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications: (pp. 519-536). Hershey, PA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of an interactive immersion environment for engendering understanding about nanotechnology: concept, construction, and implementation
2016 (English)In: Web Design and Development: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications / [ed] M. Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016, p. 519-536Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The advent of nanoscientific applications in modern life is swiftly in progress. Nanoscale innovation comes with the pressing need to provide citizens and learners with scientific knowledge for judging the societal impact of nanotechnology. In rising to the challenge, this paper reports the developmental phase of a research agenda concerned with building and investigating a virtual environment for communicating nano-ideas. Methods involved elucidating core nano-principles through two purposefully contrasting nano “risk” and “benefit” scenarios for incorporation into an immersive system. The authors implemented the resulting 3D virtual architecture through an exploration of citizens' and school students' interaction with the virtual nanoworld. Findings suggest that users' interactive experiences of conducting the two tasks based on gestural interaction with the system serve as a cognitive gateway for engendering nano-related understanding underpinning perceived hopes and fears and as a stimulating pedagogical basis from which to teach complex science concepts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139466 (URN)10.4018/978-1-4666-8619-9.ch024 (DOI)2-s2.0-84958936302 (Scopus ID)9781466686199 (ISBN)1466686197 (ISBN)9781466686205 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, Dnr 2011–5569 (2011-37694-88055-31)
Available from: 2017-07-26 Created: 2017-07-26 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Haglund, J., Jeppsson, F., Melander, E., Pendrill, A.-M., Xie, C. & Schönborn, K. (2016). Infrared cameras in science education. Infrared physics & technology, 75, 150-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infrared cameras in science education
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2016 (English)In: Infrared physics & technology, ISSN 1350-4495, E-ISSN 1879-0275, Vol. 75, p. 150-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2016
Keywords
Infrared cameras; Science education; Student inquiry; Open-ended laboratory exercises; Predict-observe-explain
National Category
Educational Sciences Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126817 (URN)10.1016/j.infrared.2015.12.009 (DOI)000371555800022 ()
Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8888-6843

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