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Bäckman, Carl
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Ahlberg, M., Bäckman, C., Jones, C., Walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2015). Moving on in life after intensive care - partners' experience of group communication. Nursing in Critical Care, 20(5), 256-263
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2015 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 256-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:Partners have a burdensome time during and after their partners’ intensive care period. They may appear to be coping welloutwardly but inside feel vulnerable and lost. Evaluated interventions for partners on this aspect are limited.

Aim:The aim of this study was to describe the experience of participating in group communication with other partners of former intensivecare patients.

Design:The study has a descriptive intervention-based design where group communication for partners of former, surviving intensive careunit (ICU) patients was evaluated.

Methods:A strategic selection was made of adult partners to former adult intensive care patients (n=15), 5 men and 10 women, aged37–89 years. Two group communication sessions lasting 2 h were held at monthly intervals with three to five partners. The partners later wrote,in a notebook, about their feelings of participating in group communications. To deepen the understanding of the impact of the sessions, six ofthe partners were interviewed. Content analysis was used to analyse the notebooks and the interviews.

Findings:Three categories were identified: (1) Emotional impact, the partners felt togetherness and experienced worries and gratitude, (2)Confirmation, consciousness through insight and reflection and (3) The meeting design, group constellation and recommendation to participatein group communication.

Conclusion:Partners of an intensive care patient are on a journey, constantly trying to adapt to the new situation and find new strategiesto ever-changing circumstances. Group communications contributed to togetherness and confirmation. To share experiences with others is oneway for partners to be able to move forward in life.

Relevance to clinical practice:Group communication with other patients’ partners eases the process of going through the burden ofbeing a partner to an intensive care patient. Group communications needs to be further developed and evaluated to obtain consensus andevidence for the best practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Communication, content analysis, intensive care, nursing, partners
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119295 (URN)10.1111/nicc.12192 (DOI)000359901900006 ()26032101 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-12 Created: 2015-06-12 Last updated: 2018-10-30
Ahlberg, M., Bäckman, C., Jones, C., Walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2014). Group communication confirm feelings among partners of former intensive care patients. In: : . Paper presented at National Congress for ICU nurses in Sweden.
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115849 (URN)
Conference
National Congress for ICU nurses in Sweden
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2015-04-07
Bäckman, C., Ahlberg, M., Jones, C., Walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2014). Group conversations after a long stay in the intensive care. In: : . Paper presented at National Congress for ICU nurses in Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group conversations after a long stay in the intensive care
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115850 (URN)
Conference
National Congress for ICU nurses in Sweden
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2015-04-07
Jones, C., Bäckman, C. & Griffiths, R. D. (2012). Intensive care diaries and relatives' symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder after critical illness: a pilot study. American Journal of Critical Care, 21(3), 172-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intensive care diaries and relatives' symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder after critical illness: a pilot study
2012 (English)In: American Journal of Critical Care, ISSN 1062-3264, E-ISSN 1937-710X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 172-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Relatives of patients recovering from critical illness have been shown to be at risk of developing Post Traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD).

Objectives: The primary aim of this pilot study was to test whether the provision of an ICU diary to the patient and their relatives reduced the level of PTSD-related symptoms in the close family members.

Methods: Observational study of close family members of Intensive care patients, with an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay of more than 72 hrs, recruited in two centres of a 12 centred randomised controlled trial examining the effect of a diary outlining the details of the patients ICU stay on the development of new onset PTSD on patients. The close family members of the patients were recruited to examine the additional effect of the provision of the patient diary on their PTSD-related symptoms.

Results 36 family members were recruited and 30 completed the study. Where the patient received their diary at 1 month the family members showed lower levels of PTSD-related symptoms (p=0.03) at the 3 month follow-up compared to the control relatives.

Conclusions: The provision of an ICU diary may be effective in aiding psychological recovery in families after critical illness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aliso Viejo, CA, USA: American Association of Critical Care Nurses, 2012
Keywords
Families, critical illness, diaries, PTSD-related symptoms, memories, intervention, follow-up, rehabilitation
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70482 (URN)10.4037/ajcc2012569 (DOI)000310641300011 ()22549573 (PubMedID)
Note

The article originial title before publishing on line was Intensive Care diaries reduce PTSD-related symptom levels in relatives following critical illness: a pilot study.

Available from: 2011-09-09 Created: 2011-09-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Orwelius, L., Bäckman, C., Fredrikson, M., Simonsson, E., Nordlund, P., Samuelsson, A. & Sjöberg, F. (2011). Social integration: an important factor for health-related quality of life after critical illness. INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, 37(5), 831-838
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social integration: an important factor for health-related quality of life after critical illness
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2011 (English)In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, ISSN 0342-4642, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To examine to what extent availability of social integration affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in former intensive care unit (ICU) patients and how it relates to corresponding findings in a general reference group. Controlled, multicenter, prospective, explorative study. HRQoL data (SF-36) were collected from three combined medical and surgical ICUs in the south-east of Sweden. Social integration was assessed by the Availability of Social Integration (AVSI) instrument (seven questions related to the social interaction of the patient). As reference group, a random sample (n = 6,093) of people from the uptake area of the hospitals was used. Social integration (AVSI), HRQoL (SF-36), and comorbidity were examined also in the reference group. None. The level of social integration significantly affected HRQoL for the former ICU patients, whereas no such effect was seen for the general reference group. For the ICU patients, social integration affected HRQoL to a larger extent than age, sex, and the ICU-related factors examined, but to a lower extent than the pre-existing diseases. For a comprehensive assessment of HRQoL in former ICU patients, it is mandatory to include the effect of social integration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science Business Media, 2011
Keywords
Availability of social integration (AVSI), Health-related quality of life, Comorbidity, Intensive care, Follow-up
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68021 (URN)10.1007/s00134-011-2137-0 (DOI)000289291900015 ()
Note
The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com: Lotti Orvelius, Carl Bäckman, Mats Fredrikson, Eva Simonsson, Peter Nordlund, Anders Samuelsson and Folke Sjöberg, Social integration: an important factor for health-related quality of life after critical illness, 2011, INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, (37), 5, 831-838. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-011-2137-0 Copyright: Springer Science Business Media http://www.springerlink.com/Available from: 2011-05-06 Created: 2011-05-06 Last updated: 2012-03-25
Bäckman, C. G. (2011). The photo-diary and follow-up appointment on the ICU: Giving back the time to patients and relatives.: A descriptive and interventional study. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The photo-diary and follow-up appointment on the ICU: Giving back the time to patients and relatives.: A descriptive and interventional study
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients on the ICU often spend a great deal of their time either unconscious or heavily sedated. When they return from the zone between life and death they are often in a state of confusion where dreams and delusions are intertwined with reality and it is not always easy to distinguish them apart. These experiences could lead to psychological problems and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Recovery may be improved by filling in the significant memory gaps and explaining what really happened during the “chaotic” time on the ICU. The provision of a diary describing the patients’ stay in ICU on a day to day basis and a follow-up meeting (together named the ICU-diary concept), may help the whole family to understand.

Aim: The principal aim of this thesis was to see if the ICU-diary concept was of help to patients and relatives in the recovery after critical illness. A further aim was to look for precipitants in the ICU of PTSD.

Material and Methods: ICU patients in a handful of European countries and their relatives have been studied. The studies have been single and multi-centred and we have used descriptive observational, randomised controlled and cohort study designs, including matched case-control designs. Quantitative methods have been used with questionnaires and structured interviews using established instruments (i.e Post-traumatic stress syndrome screening-14, Post-traumatic diagnostic scale, ICU memory tool, Short Form-36, Pearlin-Schooler Mastery Scale, Hopelessness scale) as the principal means of data collection.

Results: The ICU-diary concept was seen to be a positive and useful aid in helping patients and their relatives understand the events that took place during the time on the ICU. It also decreased the risk for PTSD among patients and relatives. Patients that were supported with the ICU-diary concept perceived a better health-related quality of life even 3 years after the ICU stay. We did not find any definite improvement by the ICU-diary concept in mastery and hope. Variations in how the patients were cared for in the ICU had a significant effect on the development of PTSD. The implementation of an ICU diary, for instance, was associated with a lower frequency of PTSD.

Conclusions: The ICU-diary concept was found helpful by patients and their relatives. It was associated with a reduction in new onset PTSD and improved health-related quality of life. The results are encouraging and suggest that an ICU diary may represent an important first step to help patients and relatives come to terms with their experiences during critical illness.ISBN 978-

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011. p. 44
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1259
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70485 (URN)978-91-7393-076-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-09-30, Fornborgen, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-09-09 Created: 2011-09-09 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Orwelius, L., Fredriksson, M., Bäckman, C., Persson, J. & Sjöberg, F. (2010). Can ICU admission be predicted?. In: : . Paper presented at 30th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, 9-12 March 2010, Brussels, Belgium (pp. 414). BioMed Central, 14(Suppl 1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can ICU admission be predicted?
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2010 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

After intensive care (IC), patients report poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Many factors affect the patients and influence the HRQoL after discharge. One of these factors is the patient's health status before the critical care period. In a previous study we found that the IC patients have a high frequency of pre-existing diseases. However, it is unknown to what extent these pre-existing diseases affect the consumption of hospital resources (measured as days as inpatients) in the time period before admission to the ICU and during the years following it. The consumption prior to the ICU event may also be claimed to herald an increased risk for a later ICU admittance? The aim of this study was to examine the hospital care consumption of former ICU patients 3 years prior to and 3 years after the intensive care period. This was examined in relation to the pre-existing health status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2010
Series
Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535 ; 14(Suppl 1)
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125610 (URN)10.1186/cc8646 (DOI)
Conference
30th International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, 9-12 March 2010, Brussels, Belgium
Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-02-26 Last updated: 2016-03-01
Orwelius, L., Bäckman, C., Fredrikson, M., Nordlund, P., Sjöberg, F. & Walther, S. (2010). COPING STRATEGY AND PERCEIVED HOPELESSNESS ARE IMPORTANT FOR HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER CRITICAL ILLNESS in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S392-S392. In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE (pp. S392-S392). Springer Science Business Media, 36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COPING STRATEGY AND PERCEIVED HOPELESSNESS ARE IMPORTANT FOR HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER CRITICAL ILLNESS in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S392-S392
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2010 (English)In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S392-S392Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science Business Media, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61193 (URN)000281679501265 ()
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2012-03-13
Jones, C., Bäckman, C., Capuzzo, M., Egerod, I., Flaatten, H., Granja, C., . . . Griffiths, R. D. (2010). Intensive care diaries reduce new onset post traumatic stress disorder following critical illness: a randomised, controlled trial. Critical Care, 14(5), Article ID R168.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intensive care diaries reduce new onset post traumatic stress disorder following critical illness: a randomised, controlled trial
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2010 (English)In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 14, no 5, article id R168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Patients recovering from critical illness have been shown to be at risk of developing Post Traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD). This study was to evaluate whether a prospectively collected diary of a patient's intensive care unit (ICU) stay when used during convalescence following critical illness will reduce the development of new onset PTSD.

METHODS: Intensive care patients with an ICU stay of more than 72 hours were recruited to a randomised controlled trial examining the effect of a diary outlining the details of the patients ICU stay on the development of acute PTSD. The intervention patients received their ICU diary at 1 month following critical care discharge and the final assessment of the development of acute PTSD was made at 3 months.

RESULTS: 352 patients were randomised to the study at 1 month. The incidence of new cases of PTSD was reduced in the intervention group compared to the control patients (5% versus 13%, P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS: The provision of an ICU diary is effective in aiding psychological recovery and reducing the incidence of new PTSD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2010
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70481 (URN)10.1186/cc9260 (DOI)000284596500007 ()20843344 (PubMedID)
Note

RACHEL GROUP in addition to the authors: Denmark, Christensen D, Bogø I, Hansen R, Kjerrumgård H, Mathiasen L, Hyldested C, Toft C, Nordsjaelland Hospital; Bagger C, Larsen MB, Frank de Jong L, Odense University Hospital; Ågård AS, Knudsen K, Hinzel T, Århus University Hospital, Skejby; Italy, Scaramuzza A & Bertacchini S, Ferrara; Norway, Schou Landmark J, Salomonsen A, Tøien K, Walther S, Oslo University Hospital Ulleval; Muri AK, Haukeland University Hospital; Portugal, Neutel E, Gomes E, Cardoso T, Ferreira R, Machado C, Santos C, Pinto S, Hospital Santo António - Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Amaro A, Morujão E, Jerónimo A, Rodrigues T, Carvalho F, Silva A, Morais A Hospital Pedro Hispano; Sweden, Löwenmark U, Etemad W, Rosell E, Sahgrenska University Hospital; Carlson U, Wirbrand Holmquist A, Kungälv Hospital; Åkerman E, Ersson A, Malmö University Hospital; UK, Tobin C, Whiston.

Available from: 2011-09-09 Created: 2011-09-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Bäckman, C., Orwelius, L., Sjöberg, F., Fredrikson, M. & Walther, S. (2010). Long-term effect of the ICU-diary concept on quality of life after critical illness. ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, 54(6), 736-743
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term effect of the ICU-diary concept on quality of life after critical illness
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2010 (English)In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 736-743Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Critically ill patients often spend time in the intensive care unit (ICU) either unconscious or sedated. On recovery, they are often in a state of confusion with memory loss that may be associated with a longstanding reduction in health-related quality of life (QoL). We hypothesised that the ICU-diary concept could improve their QoL by filling in their memory gaps. Methods A non-randomised, prospective study in a non-academic eight-bedded general ICU. A group of patients (n=38) were selected to receive the ICU-diary concept (keeping a diary with photos while on the ICU plus a follow-up meeting) when a long and complicated course was expected. Health-related QoL at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months was compared with a group that did not receive the ICU-diary (n=224). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) was used to measure health-related QoL. Multiple regression models adjusted for age, sex, illness severity, pre-existing disease and diagnostic category was used to analyse the effects of the ICU-diary concept at 6 months, and changes over time were analysed using repeated measures MANOVA. Results Crude and adjusted scores for two dimensions of SF-36 (general health and vitality) and the physical component summary score were significantly higher at 6 months in the ICU-diary group (P andlt; 0.05) and some of the effects remained during the 3-year follow-up period (P andlt; 0.05). Conclusion The ICU-diary concept was associated with improved health-related QoL during the 3-year follow-up period after a critical illness. The effect of this intervention needs to be confirmed in a larger randomised study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-57425 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2010.02230.x (DOI)000278292400011 ()
Available from: 2010-06-18 Created: 2010-06-18 Last updated: 2012-03-13
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