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Segelström, Fabian
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Blomkvist, J. & Segelström, F. (2014). Benefits of External Representations in Service Design: a Distributed Cognition Perspective. Design journal, 17(3), 331-346
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benefits of External Representations in Service Design: a Distributed Cognition Perspective
2014 (English)In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 331-346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A defining characteristic of service design is the use of external representations, which support designers in making intangible aspects of services accessible and shareable. Both current and future states are externally represented, using different service design techniques, for the purposes of articulating insights, learning, communicating, collaborating, and maintaining empathy for customers. The purposes of, and techniques for, making external representations were compared with benefits of using external representations to think, suggested by the theory of distributed cognition. The analysis indicated that the service design techniques could be divided into two groups; definite and ongoing. The analysis also revealed that none of the included techniques explicitly supported designers in making multiple simultaneous representations of services. The research contributes knowledge about how the externalisations relate to benefits of making external representations, and about how to choose and use different service design techniques based on theories of distributed and situated cognition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014
Keywords
External Representations, Service Design, Cognitive Science, Distributed Cognition
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105945 (URN)10.2752/175630614X13982745782849 (DOI)000340697900003 ()
Available from: 2014-04-15 Created: 2014-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Segelström, F. & Holmlid, S. (2014). Ethnography by design: On goals and mediating artefacts. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 14(2), 134-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnography by design: On goals and mediating artefacts
2014 (English)In: Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, ISSN 1474-0222, E-ISSN 1741-265X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 134-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Design ethnography is the appropriation of ethnography for the purposes of informing design. This paper investigates the effects of these appropriations, through a comparative study of how designers and anthropologists approach the same field site and by a review of new techniques introduced by designers to do ethnography. The techniques reviewed all apply artefacts to mediate the ethnographic process. Conducting ethnography through artefacts can be done in a number of ways and three ways are discussed here, including techniques which remove the researcher from the context of study. The implications for design ethnography of the comparative study and the introductions of artefacts to facilitate ethnographic work are discussed. The implications focus on potential methodological pitfalls of the ‘designification’ of ethnography as design ethnography matures.

Keywords
Design ethnography, design probes, ethnography through artefacts, mobile ethnography
National Category
Design Social Anthropology Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118892 (URN)10.1177/1474022214560159 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-06-04 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Blomkvist, J. & Segelström, F. (2013). External Representations in Service Design: A Distributed Cognition Perspective. In: EAD 2013: Crafting the Future. Paper presented at 10th European Academy of Design Conference. Gothenburg, Sweden, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>External Representations in Service Design: A Distributed Cognition Perspective
2013 (English)In: EAD 2013: Crafting the Future, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2013, Vol. 10Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A defining characteristic of service design is the use of external representations which support the design process at various stages. Representations support designers in making intangible aspects of services accessible and shareable, making external representations especially important in service design. External representations are used both to represent current and future states, for the purposes of articulating insights, learning, communicating, collaborating, and maintaining empathy for customers. Many techniques are available that support designers in making representations of services. A comparison was made between the purposes for, and techniques used, in making external representations for service design with theories from cognitive science about benefits of using external representations to think. A pattern emerged during the analysis, indicating that the service design techniques could be divided into two groups, one of interactive techniques and one group of static techniques. Interactive techniques allow designers to interact with a dynamically changing representation, while static representations are unaffected by actions. The analysis also revealed that none of the included techniques explicitly support designers in making multiple simultaneous representations of services. The research contributes knowledge about how purposes for visualising and prototyping are related to general benefits of making external representations. It also provides insights about how to choose and use different service design techniques based on theories of distributed and situated cognition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gothenburg, Sweden: , 2013
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118702 (URN)978-91-979541-5-0 (ISBN)
Conference
10th European Academy of Design Conference
Available from: 2015-06-03 Created: 2015-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Segelström, F. (2013). Stakeholder Engagement for Service Design: How service designers identify and communicate insights. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stakeholder Engagement for Service Design: How service designers identify and communicate insights
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Intressentinvolvering för tjänstedesign : Hur tjänstedesigners identifierar och kommunicerar insikter
Abstract [en]

Service design is a field emerging from the new-found interest in services as a design material by practitioners and academics of the human-centred design tradition. As such, the field can build on the knowledge from previous work in design as well as in service research. Introducing a new design material may however also introduce new challenges to practice. The research presented in this thesis investigates how the design research phase of the human-centred design process is affected by making services a design material.

 

How users, staff and other stakeholders are involved in service design projects was studied in four studies. Two studies focused on getting a holistic view of how service designers engage stakeholders in their design research. The methods used for these two studies were interviews in one case and participatory observation in the other. The two remaining studies focused on specific aspects of the stakeholder engagement process. One compared how designers and anthropologists approach ethnography, whereas the second investigated the communicative qualities of service design visualisations.

 

It is argued that service design is a stakeholder-centred design discipline. The tools used in service design are to a large extent borrowed from other qualitative research traditions, but design-specific tools do exist. The information gathered with the tools for stakeholder engagement is then transformed into insights through analysis and synthesis. These insights are visualised to provide easily accessible representations of service situations.

 

The final section of the thesis identifies challenges ahead for service design practice, based on the findings of the thesis and based on existing theoretical frameworks for the discipline.

Abstract [sv]

Tjänstedesign är ett fält som fortfarande håller på att växa fram. Dess ursprung kan hittas i när praktiker och akademiker inom människo-centrerad design blev intresserade av tjänster som designmaterial. Tjänstedesign byggs upp baserat på kunskap från design- såväl som tjänsteforskning. Dock så innebär detta möte av traditioner att tjänstedesignspraktiken ställs inför  utmaningar som dess moderdiscipliner inte har ställts inför. Syftet med denna avhandling är att utforska hur involveringen av intressenter i designprocessen påverkas vid design av tjänster.

Fyra studier har genomförts för att studera hur användare, personal och andra intressenter involveras i tjänstedesignsprojekt. Två av studierna fokuserade på att bygga upp en holistisk bild av intressentinvolvering. Dessa båda studier genomfördes med intervjuer respektive deltagande observation som datainsamlingsmetod. De båda andra studierna fokuserade i mer detalj på specifika aspekter av intressentinvolveringen. Av dessa två studier så studerade en skillnader mellan hur designers och antropologer närmar sig etnografi och den andra vad som kommuniceras av de visualiseringar av tjänstemiljöer som är vanligt förekommande inom tjänstedesign.

Slutsatsen dras att tjänstedesign kan beskrivas som en intressent-centrerad designdisciplin. Verktygen som används inom tjänstedesign är till stor grad lånade från annan kvalitativ forskning, men även designspecifika verktyg förekommer. Den information som fås genom intressentinvolvering omvandlas till insikter genom analys och syntes. Dessa insikter visualiseras sedan i lättillgängliga representationer av tjänstetransaktioner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013. p. 185
Series
Linköping Studies in Arts and Science, ISSN 0282-9800 ; 586
Keywords
service design, design, service, design research, tjänstedesign, design, tjänst, användarstudier
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97320 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-97320 (DOI)978-91-7519-554-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-10-25, Key1, Key-huset, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-09-26 Created: 2013-09-09 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Segelström, F. & Holmlid, S. (2012). Gamla Linköping christmas market in early 19th century environment in Linköping/Sweden. In: Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut (Ed.), Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations (pp. 72-77). Norderstedt: Books on Demand
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gamla Linköping christmas market in early 19th century environment in Linköping/Sweden
2012 (English)In: Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations / [ed] Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut, Norderstedt: Books on Demand , 2012, p. 72-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The field of design has changed completely during the past. Previously, design was seen as a profession that operates in specialist areas such as graphic design, product design, and fashion design; during the last 10 years it changed its scope from ‘Design Centred Design’ to ‘User Centred Design’. As such, and building on the service-dominant logic and services marketing, service design goes beyond designing artefacts and is argued to be no longer limited to the design of tangible products only, but also designs complex and interactive service processes and ecosystems. These developments lead to the emergence of ‘service design’, a multidisciplinary and systematic approach, which can cope with the functionality and complexity of services by visualizing their systems and processes as well as by placing the client at the heart of the process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Norderstedt: Books on Demand, 2012
Keywords
service design, tourism, design ethnography, applied anthropology
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80365 (URN)978-38-482-1630-7 (ISBN)
Projects
Service Design in Tourism
Available from: 2012-08-24 Created: 2012-08-24 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Segelström, F. & Holmlid, S. (2012). One Case, Three Ethnographic Styles: Exploring different ethnographic approaches to the same broad brief. In: EPIC 2012 Proceedings: . Paper presented at EPIC 2012: Renewal, Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference, 14-17 October, Savannah, Georgia, USA (pp. 48-62). American Anthropological Association, 2012(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One Case, Three Ethnographic Styles: Exploring different ethnographic approaches to the same broad brief
2012 (English)In: EPIC 2012 Proceedings, American Anthropological Association , 2012, Vol. 2012, no 1, p. 48-62Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In a research project aimed at suggesting improvements at an annual advent fair three different ethnographic research approaches were used; Social Anthropology, Interaction Design and Mobile Ethnography. The paper focuses on how the three different approaches on ethnography affected choices in the research process, the outcomes of the research and how the outcomes were presented. It is found that the different motivations for doing ethnography between the three approaches make their outcomes differ in a clear way. These differences make the three ethnographic approaches suitable for achieving different research outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Anthropological Association, 2012
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80384 (URN)10.1111/j.1559-8918.2012.00007.x (DOI)978-0-9826767-7-6 (ISBN)
Conference
EPIC 2012: Renewal, Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference, 14-17 October, Savannah, Georgia, USA
Available from: 2012-08-24 Created: 2012-08-24 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Misic, V., Rössner, M. & Segelström, F. (2012). SDnext: Moving towards the creation of a PhD network in service design (workshop). Paper presented at Third Nordic Conference on Service Design and Service Innovation (ServDes 2012), Espoo, Finland. Espoo
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SDnext: Moving towards the creation of a PhD network in service design (workshop)
2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Espoo: , 2012
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80958 (URN)
Conference
Third Nordic Conference on Service Design and Service Innovation (ServDes 2012), Espoo, Finland
Available from: 2012-09-04 Created: 2012-09-04 Last updated: 2012-09-11
Segelström, F. (2012). Service Design Mini-dictionary. In: Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut (Ed.), Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations (pp. 132-133). Norderstedt: Books on Demand
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Service Design Mini-dictionary
2012 (English)In: Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations / [ed] Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut, Norderstedt: Books on Demand , 2012, p. 132-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The field of design has changed completely during the past. Previously, design was seen as a profession that operates in specialist areas such as graphic design, product design, and fashion design; during the last 10 years it changed its scope from ‘Design Centred Design’ to ‘User Centred Design’. As such, and building on the service-dominant logic and services marketing, service design goes beyond designing artefacts and is argued to be no longer limited to the design of tangible products only, but also designs complex and interactive service processes and ecosystems. These developments lead to the emergence of ‘service design’, a multidisciplinary and systematic approach, which can cope with the functionality and complexity of services by visualizing their systems and processes as well as by placing the client at the heart of the process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Norderstedt: Books on Demand, 2012
Keywords
service design, tourism, design ethnography, applied anthropology, Människa-datorinteraktion (interaktionsdesign) Design Socialantropologi
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80959 (URN)978-3848216307 (ISBN)
Projects
service design
Available from: 2012-09-04 Created: 2012-09-04 Last updated: 2014-12-05Bibliographically approved
Segelström, F. (2012). Understanding Visualisation Practices: A distributed cognition perspective (1ed.). In: Satu Miettinen & Anu Valtonen (Ed.), Service Design with Theory: Discussions on Change, Value and Methods (pp. 197-208). Vantaa, Finland: Lapland University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding Visualisation Practices: A distributed cognition perspective
2012 (English)In: Service Design with Theory: Discussions on Change, Value and Methods / [ed] Satu Miettinen & Anu Valtonen, Vantaa, Finland: Lapland University Press , 2012, 1, p. 197-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The book presents discussions and debates from three distinct areas of service design research: societal change, value co-creation and development of service design. User participation can change society, and service design can contribute to this change. The service design approach provides tools for engaging the citizen and policy design. Service design plays a role in value co-creation and innovation processes. This role is more strategic than it is merely operative. Service design is establishing itself as a discipline. This debate includes a strong multi-disciplinary approach and the research and development of service design methods. The book includes chapters from top service design authors (Daniela Sangiorgi, Stefan Holmlid, Andy Polaine, Nicola Morelli etc.) and interesting case studies (Arne Van Oosterom and Tim Schuurman from Designthinkers and Erik Widmark and Emma Johansson from Transformator etc.) from design consultancies and researchers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vantaa, Finland: Lapland University Press, 2012 Edition: 1
Keywords
service, service design, distributed cognition, external representations, services as systems, visualisations, service, service design, teori, delaktiggörande, sociala innovationer, användarcentrerad design
National Category
Design Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85950 (URN)978-952-484-551-9 (ISBN)978-952-484-587-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-12-04 Created: 2012-12-04 Last updated: 2014-12-05Bibliographically approved
Dimanche, F., Keup, M., Prayag, G., Segelström, F. & Holmlid, S. (2012). What is service design. In: Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut (Ed.), Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations (pp. 10-21). Norderstedt: Books on Demand
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is service design
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Service Design and Tourism: Case studies of applied research projects on mobile ethnography for tourism destinations / [ed] Marc Stickdorn, Birgit Frischhut, Norderstedt: Books on Demand , 2012, p. 10-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Tourism becomes more and more transparent through social media and tourism review websites. Nowadays, it’s the individual guest’s experience that makes or breaks the success of a tourism product. Thus, the focus in tourism shifts from mere marketing communications to meaningful experiences. Service design thinking can provide an in-depth and holistic understanding of customers required to co-create meaningful experiences with guests.The book provides an introduction into service design and tourism and presents seven case studies of European tourism destinations, which used the app myServiceFellow as a mobile ethnography research tool to gain genuine customer insights. The book reports lessons learned of these case studies, gives managerial implications and an outlook on future research fields for service design in tourism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Norderstedt: Books on Demand, 2012
Keywords
service design, applied anthropology, design ethnography
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80364 (URN)978-3-8482-1630-7 (ISBN)
Projects
Service Design in Tourism
Available from: 2012-08-24 Created: 2012-08-24 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
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