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Vavruch, Ludek
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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Forsberg, D., Lundström, C., Andersson, M., Vavruch, L., Tropp, H. & Knutsson, H. (2013). Fully automatic measurements of axial vertebral rotation for assessment of spinal deformity in idiopathic scoliosis. Physics in Medicine and Biology, 58(6), 1775-1787
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fully automatic measurements of axial vertebral rotation for assessment of spinal deformity in idiopathic scoliosis
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2013 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 1775-1787Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reliable measurements of spinal deformities in idiopathic scoliosis are vital, since they are used for assessing the degree of scoliosis, deciding upon treatment and monitoring the progression of the disease. However, commonly used two dimensional methods (e.g. the Cobb angle) do not fully capture the three dimensional deformity at hand in scoliosis, of which axial vertebral rotation (AVR) is considered to be of great importance. There are manual methods for measuring the AVR, but they are often time-consuming and related with a high intra- and inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present a fully automatic method for estimating the AVR in images from computed tomography. The proposed method is evaluated on four scoliotic patients with 17 vertebrae each and compared with manual measurements performed by three observers using the standard method by Aaro-Dahlborn. The comparison shows that the difference in measured AVR between automatic and manual measurements are on the same level as the inter-observer difference. This is further supported by a high intraclass correlation coefficient (0.971-0.979), obtained when comparing the automatic measurements with the manual measurements of each observer. Hence, the provided results and the computational performance, only requiring approximately 10 to 15 s for processing an entire volume, demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed method.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics (IOP), 2013
National Category
Medical Image Processing Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89619 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/58/6/1775 (DOI)000315735400007 ()
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , SM10-0022
Available from: 2013-02-28 Created: 2013-02-28 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Peolsson, A., Söderlund, A., Engquist, M., Lind, B., Löfgren, H., Vavruch, L., . . . Öberg, B. (2013). Physical Function Outcome in Cervical Radiculopathy Patients After Physiotherapy Alone Compared With Anterior Surgery Followed by Physiotherapy: A Prospective Randomized Study With a 2-Year Follow-up. Spine, 38(4), 300-307
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Function Outcome in Cervical Radiculopathy Patients After Physiotherapy Alone Compared With Anterior Surgery Followed by Physiotherapy: A Prospective Randomized Study With a 2-Year Follow-up
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2013 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 300-307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Design. Prospective randomized study.

Objective. To investigate differences in physical functional outcome in patients with radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease, after structured physiotherapy alone (consisting of neck-specific exercises with a cognitive-behavioral approach) versus after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) followed by the same structured physiotherapy program.

Summary of Background Data. No earlier studies have evaluated the effectiveness of a structured physiotherapy program or postoperative physical rehabilitation after ACDF for patients with magnetic resonance imaging–verified nerve compression due to cervical disc disease.

Methods. Our prospective randomized study included 63 patients with radiculopathy and magnetic resonance imaging–verified nerve root compression, who were randomized to receive either ACDF in combination with physiotherapy or physiotherapy alone. For 49 of these patients, an independent examiner measured functional outcomes, including active range of neck motion, neck muscle endurance, and hand-related functioning before treatment and at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-ups.

Results. There were no significant differences between the 2 treatment alternatives in any of the measurements performed (P = 0.17–0.91). Both groups showed improvements over time in neck muscle endurance (P ≤ 0.01), manual dexterity (P ≤ 0.03), and right-handgrip strength (P = 0.01).

Conclusion. Compared with a structured physiotherapy program alone, ACDF followed by physiotherapy did not result in additional improvements in neck active range of motion, neck muscle endurance, or hand-related function in patients with radiculopathy. We suggest that a structured physiotherapy program should precede a decision for ACDF intervention in patients with radiculopathy, to reduce the need for surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013
Keywords
cervical spine, disc, radiculopathy, surgery, physiotherapy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90087 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0b013e31826d2cbb (DOI)000315029600013 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)||

Available from: 2013-03-21 Created: 2013-03-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Peolsson, A., Hedlund, R., Vavruch, L. & Öberg, B. (2003). Predictive factors for the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion. European spine journal, 12(3), 274-280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive factors for the outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion
2003 (English)In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 274-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a prospective study, 103 patients were randomised to anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical carbon-fibre intervertebral fusion cage or the Cloward procedure. Preoperative background variables, active range of neck motion, handgrip strength, radiological evaluation and subjective variables were used in a multiple regression model to find the strongest predictors of postoperative outcome as measured by current pain intensity and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Male sex, greater kyphosis at the level operated on, non-smoking, a greater neck mobility in right rotation, low disability on NDI, and older age were predictors of pain reduction and explained 30% of current pain intensity at follow-up. Higher educational level, non-smoking, greater kyphosis at the level operated on, a greater flexion mobility, greater right handgrip strength and lower current pain intensity were predictors of improvement, and explained 28% of the postoperative outcome on NDI. The most important predictor for postoperative pain intensity was the magnitude of the preoperative kyphosis. Preoperative pain intensity was the most important predictor for improved NDI. At follow-up about 70% of the patients still had deficit based on current pain intensity and NDI, and 44% had remaining dysfunction based on Odom's criteria. In conclusion, the multivariate analysis shows that male sex, non-smoking, greater segmental kyphosis and a low pain and disability level are preoperative predictors of a good outcome in ACDF. In addition, the study suggests the importance of other predictive variables than those studied for the outcome of ACDF.

Keywords
cervical spine, intervertebral fusion, prognostic factors, outcome
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47773 (URN)10.1007/s00586-003-0530-2 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Peolsson, A., Vavruch, L. & Öberg, B. (2002). Disability after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease. Advances in Physiotherapy, 4(3), 111-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disability after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease
2002 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 111-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few prospective studies on outcome have been conducted with respect to disability after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), and the need for further rehabilitation after surgery is unknown. Thirty-four patients with cervical disc disease verified by magnetic resonance imaging were included before ACDF with a cervical carbon fibre intervertebral fusion cage. Measurements took place the day before, 6 months and 1 year after surgery, and consisted of both objective and subjective measurements. The results showed a significant improvement from surgery in neck muscle endurance in flexion, neck strength in lateral flexion, some of the pain variables, numbness, neck specific disability, change in general health and symptom satisfaction at the 1-year follow-up. Except for worsening in general health, there were no significant differences between the 6-month and the 1-year follow-up. Despite improvement in several of the variables, about one-third of the patients had deficits in the objective measurements and about two-thirds had deficits in the subjective variables. Only five patients were without neck problems according to average pain, the Neck Disability Index and general health. This suggests that there is still a great need for improvement both of the surgical procedure and the rehabilitation afterwards.

Keywords
Cervical radiculopathy, Neck, Outcome, Rehabilitation, Spine, Surgery
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46883 (URN)10.1080/140381902320387531 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Javid, D., Hedlund, R., Vavruch, L. & Leszniewski, W. (2001). Is the efficacy of the Cloward procedure overestimated? Technique of evaluation affects the outcome. European spine journal, 10(3), 222-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the efficacy of the Cloward procedure overestimated? Technique of evaluation affects the outcome
2001 (English)In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 222-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of the evaluation technique on the outcome of the Cloward procedure in cervical radiculopathy. The retrospective study included 94 consecutive patients operated on with anterior decompression and fusion with heterologous bone (Surgibone, Unilab). There were 56 men and 38 women, with a mean age of 48 years (range 27-78 years). Sixty-six patients had a single-level fusion, 26 a two-level fusion and one patient had a three-level fusion. The follow-up rate was 91/94 (97%) and evaluation was performed by an independent observer. Pain was quantified by visual analogue scale (VAS, range 0-100), functional disability by the new functional index Cervical Spine Functional Score (CSFS, range 0-100) and by the Neck Pain Disability Index (NPDI, range 0-100). The overall clinical outcome was assessed as excellent, good, fair or poor by both the patient and by the independent observer using Odom's criteria. At a mean follow-up of 26 months (range 12-56 months) the mean pain index was 39 (range 0-98), the mean CSFS 39 (range 0-85) and the mean NPDI 32 (range 0-76). The classification of the observer was 37% excellent, 40% good, 17% fair and 6% poor, and that of the patient was 53% excellent, 23% good, 20% fair and 4% poor. In the group classified as good by the observer, all scores were above 40, suggesting considerable remaining symptoms, and only 50% had returned to work. The results suggest that previous reports on the Cloward procedure using categorizations into excellent, good, fair or poor have overestimated the efficacy of the procedure. Only an excellent, but not a good, result as classified by the patient or an independent observer reflects a successful outcome. Neither of the variables studied seems independently sufficient for a balanced reflection of the outcome. The results suggest pain (VAS) as the primary outcome measurement, which, combined with the overall evaluation by the independent observer and work status, gives a multidimensional expression of the outcome.

Keywords
Cloward, Fusion, Outcome, Radiculopathy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47313 (URN)10.1007/s005860100261 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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