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Neergaard, A. & Woolfson, C. (2017). Sweden: A model in dissolution?. In: Marino, Stefania, Judith Roosblad and Rinus Penninx (Ed.), Trade Unions and Migrant Workers: New Contexts and Challenges in Europe (pp. 200-223). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden: A model in dissolution?
2017 (English)In: Trade Unions and Migrant Workers: New Contexts and Challenges in Europe / [ed] Marino, Stefania, Judith Roosblad and Rinus Penninx, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017, p. 200-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This timely book analyses the relationship between trade unions, immigration and migrant workers across eleven European countries in the period between the 1990s and 2015. It constitutes an extensive update of a previous comparative analysis – published by Rinus Penninx and Judith Roosblad in 2000 – that has become an important reference in the field. The book offers an overview of how trade unions manage issues of inclusion and solidarity in the current economic and political context, characterized by increasing challenges for labour organizations and rising hostility towards migrants. The qualitative analysis of trade union strategies towards immigration and migrant workers is based on a common analytical framework centred on the idea of ‘dilemmas’ that trade unions have to face when dealing with immigration and migrant workers. This approach facilitates comparative analysis and distinguishes patterns of union policies and actions across three groups of countries, identifying some explanations for observed similarities and differences. In addition, the book also includes theoretical chapters by expert scholars from a range of disciplinary fields including industrial relations, migration studies and political economy.This comprehensive comparative analysis is an essential resource for academics across a range of disciplines as well as policy-makers, practitioners and organizations involved in trade unions and migrant inclusion and integration. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144106 (URN)978 1 78811 407 3 (ISBN)
Projects
RJ P16-0718:1 En grundläggande motsättning? Invandrade arbetare och främlingsfientlighet i svenska arbetarfackföreningar
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P16-0718:1
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-01-05
Woolfson, C. (2017). The Politics of Brexit: European Free Movement of Labour and Labour Standards. Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Politics of Brexit: European Free Movement of Labour and Labour Standards
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper attempts to reassess the Brexit debate in the UK over immigration and free movement of labour in terms of the politics of austerity. It advances a progressive case for Brexit based on regaining national sovereignty to enable the effective defence of national labour standards outside of the neoliberal European project. The issue of labour standards is a cause that paradoxically the current Conservative administration has sought to champion, although on a highly contestable basis. In the UK general election of 2017, the Labour Party has significantly advanced its position on the basis of an anti-austerity program while the Conservative government has entered into a likely terminal crisis. It is argued that rejecting membership of the supranational European Union has the potential to advance labour rights further in an inclusive and non-xenophobic way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017. p. 43
Series
ThemES - Themes on Migration and Ethnic Studies, ISSN 1651-8306 ; 45
Keywords
Brexit, free movement, labour standards, austerity, European Union, national sovereignty
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143202 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Woolfson, C. & Sommers, J. (2016). Austerity and the Demise of Social Europe: The Baltic Model versus the European Social Model. Globalizations, 13(1), 78-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Austerity and the Demise of Social Europe: The Baltic Model versus the European Social Model
2016 (English)In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 78-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article draws on the experience of the imposition of radical austerity measures in the Baltic states. It challenges the myth that austerity can be achieved in a socially and economically ‘costless’ manner. Baltic-style austerity has now become a template of ‘successful adjustment’ and a recipe for recovery of the Eurozone. The authors argue contra such ‘myth-making’ that austerity is compromising the longer run sustainability of societies that follow this path, while simultaneously ending prospects of the adhesion of a European ‘Social Model’ in the post-communist periphery. The article is a contribution to an emerging debate in academic and policy circles concerning the viability and future of Europe’s ‘Social Model’ in an age of austerity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
austerity, Baltic states, European Social Model, internal devaluation, neoliberalism
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119397 (URN)10.1080/14747731.2015.1052623 (DOI)000375231400006 ()
Available from: 2015-06-16 Created: 2015-06-16 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Juska, A. & Woolfson, C. (2016). The moral discourses of ‘post-crisis’ neoliberalism: a case study of Lithuania’s Labour Code reform. Critical Discourse Studies, 14(2), 132-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The moral discourses of ‘post-crisis’ neoliberalism: a case study of Lithuania’s Labour Code reform
2016 (English)In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 132-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article problematizes the neoliberal reconfiguration of labour rights in Lithuania, a newer European Union member state, in which the impacts of the global economic and financial crisis were particularly severe and where radical austerity measures were subsequently imposed. Now, after six years, in an attempt to resolve the exhaustion of previous austerity-based solutions for economic recovery, a new Labour Code is being introduced which will further weaken labour protections and labour rights. This article analyses conflicting positions in current debates over Labour Code reform. It attempts to map the mobilization of strategic discursive resources in an unfolding dialogical ‘moral’ politics of Labour Code reform in the current conjuncture of ‘postcrisis’. Theoretically, this article draws upon the seminal work of the early Soviet Marxist scholar V. N. Voloshinov in proposing a dialogical method which foregrounds the interconnections of language, class and ideology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2016
Keywords
Labour Code reform, moral discourses, post-crisis, Lithuania, neoliberalism
National Category
Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130484 (URN)10.1080/17405904.2016.1231961 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-08-09 Created: 2016-08-09 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Juska, A. & Woolfson, C. (2015). Austerity, labour market segmentation and emigration: the case of Lithuania. Industrial relations journal, 46(3), 236-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Austerity, labour market segmentation and emigration: the case of Lithuania
2015 (English)In: Industrial relations journal, ISSN 0019-8692, E-ISSN 1468-2338, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 236-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The so-called ‘Baltic model’ of austerity sometimes receives uncritical praise from advocates of tightened austerity. This model has achieved an almost uncontested vogue among international finance officials and European Union policy makers who portray it as a ‘socially costless’ template for other crisis economies. The article examines the impact of austerity on Baltic Lithuania, a peripheral newer EU member state, and suggests that the harsh austerity measures adopted by its government in order to restore fiscal balance have been far from socially costless. Austerity has accelerated fragmentation of the labour market into a differentially advantaged primary (largely public) sector, and an increasingly informalised secondary (low-skill manufacturing and services) sector, stimulating extraordinarily high levels of emigration as the population, especially younger persons, depart from the country. We describe this here as the formation of a new austeriat.

Keywords
austerity, Baltic model, Lithuania, emigration, austeriat
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119665 (URN)10.1111/irj.12102 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-06-24 Created: 2015-06-24 Last updated: 2017-10-18
Likic-Brboric, B., Slavnic, Z. & Woolfson, C. (2015). Labour migration and informalisation: east meets west. In: Magnus Dahlstedt and Anders Neergaard (Ed.), International migration and ethnic relations: critical perspectives (pp. 227-248). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labour migration and informalisation: east meets west
2015 (English)In: International migration and ethnic relations: critical perspectives / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt and Anders Neergaard, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 227-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose– Against a theoretical discussion of informalisation, the purpose of this paper is to trace wider commonalities and migratory interconnections that are leading to informalised or deteriorated employment conditions both East and West in the enlarged Europe. Design/methodology/approach– The paper examines the ways in which informalisation has come increasingly to typify employment relations both East and West via contrastive case studies from Sweden and Latvia. Findings– The paper illustrates how a growing tendency towards informalisation of work and economy comes about as a consequence of dual tendencies towards informalisation both “from above” and “from below”. Migrant labour has a part in this process, especially in the post-EU enlargement period, increasingly enabling free movement of labour from the former socialist countries to the West. Research limitations/implications– The implications of the paper are that the harmonisation of labour standards in the enlarged EU is not necessarily in an upward direction and that wider EU labour markets may be increasingly segmented as processes of informalisation grow in scope. Practical implications– Policy-makers concerned with preserving labour standards and norms of decent work may consider the implications of the interconnected processes of informalisation and migration, in particular, with regard to “undeclared work”. Social implications– The paper raises issues concerning the European social model and its viability. Originality/value– The paper bridges research on informalisation of the economy and labour migration in the context of EU enlargement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2015
Series
Routledge advances in sociology ; 148
Keywords
Arbetsmigration
National Category
Sociology International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118617 (URN)978-1-138-78872-5 (ISBN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2015-06-02 Created: 2015-06-02 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Woolfson, C. & Mesic, N. (2015). Roma berry pickers in Sweden: Economic crisis and new contingents of the austeriat. Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research, 21(1), 37-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roma berry pickers in Sweden: Economic crisis and new contingents of the austeriat
2015 (English)In: Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research, ISSN 1024-2589, E-ISSN 1996-7284, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 37-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the current era of austerity free movement of labour has produced an ongoing but also contingent flow of migrant labour, an austeriat, moving from poorer crisis-hit regions of Europe to those countries such as Sweden where the crisis has been less severe. This article describes the working and living experiences of Bulgarian Roma berry pickers in Sweden. It argues that, in the context of a previously well-regulated labour market, an erosion of labour standards based on the exploitation of seasonal unskilled labour migrants from Bulgaria is occurring in the Swedish berry industry, in turn posing challenges for labour market actors and regulatory authorities. The article concludes with a discussion of what might be appropriate European and national trade union responses to the issues of labour precariousness which have emerged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
Roma, berry pickers, Bulgaria, austeriat, migration, Sweden, free movement
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113558 (URN)10.1177/1024258914561411 (DOI)
Projects
Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2015-01-22 Created: 2015-01-22 Last updated: 2017-10-18
Sommers, J., Woolfson, C. & Juska, A. (2014). Austerity as a global prescription and lessons from the neoliberal Baltic experiment. Economic and Labour Relations Review, 25(3), 397-416
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Austerity as a global prescription and lessons from the neoliberal Baltic experiment
2014 (English)In: Economic and Labour Relations Review, ISSN 1035-3046, E-ISSN 1838-2673, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 397-416Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses the 2008 economic crisis and its outcomes for the Baltic states. It then gives a genealogy of European economic policy responses to the crisis, tracing them from the emerging ‘freshwater’ school of economics (e.g. University of Chicago) that arose in opposition to Keynesian theory. The more immediate cause of the 2008 crisis, long in the making, was its reliance on private debt to sustain economic demand in light of profit-enhancing wage suppression. Following the 2008 financial shock, European Union policymakers crafted policy that placed the burden of adjustment on labour. A programme of austerity was chosen in much of the European Union, at odds with the post-war European ‘social model’. This represented a retreat from the notion of a European project that encouraged liberalisation of economic policy but at the same time could be harmonised with a social dimension to create a distinctive ‘Social Europe’. Nowhere was this austerity more vigorously applied than in the Baltic states. Its effects are examined here, along with lessons to be derived from that experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
Global financial crisis, austerity, migration, neoliberalism, Baltic states
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109017 (URN)10.1177/1035304614544091 (DOI)000343038100002 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011- 0338
Available from: 2014-07-28 Created: 2014-07-28 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
Woolfson, C. & Juska, A. (2014). Austerity era policing, protest and passivity in Lithuania (1ed.). In: Volker Eik and Kendra Briken (Ed.), Urban (In)Security: Policing the Neoliberal Crisis (pp. 294-322). Ottowa: Red Quill Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Austerity era policing, protest and passivity in Lithuania
2014 (English)In: Urban (In)Security: Policing the Neoliberal Crisis / [ed] Volker Eik and Kendra Briken, Ottowa: Red Quill Publications , 2014, 1, p. 294-322Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During the global crisis, in Lithuania the centralization of the police force accelerated as locally accountable and more community-oriented municipal police units came under the direct control and supervision of the national police headquarters. Centralization of command and control went hand in hand with policies strengthening the military ethos of police, manifested in military-style deployments resulting in the supression of popular 'voice' in mass demonstrations and increasing propensities to 'exit' among the discontented population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ottowa: Red Quill Publications, 2014 Edition: 1
Keywords
global crisis, policing, post-communism, urban protest
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103152 (URN)978-1-926958-29-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2017-10-18
Woolfson, C. & Sommers, J. (2014). Conclusion: The neoliberal Baltic austerity model against Social Europe (1ed.). In: Jeffrey Sommers and Charles Woolfson (Ed.), The Contradictions of Austerity : The Socio-Economic Costs of the Neoliberal Baltic Model (pp. 103-110). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conclusion: The neoliberal Baltic austerity model against Social Europe
2014 (English)In: The Contradictions of Austerity : The Socio-Economic Costs of the Neoliberal Baltic Model / [ed] Jeffrey Sommers and Charles Woolfson, London and New York: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 103-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2014 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Studies in Economics
Keywords
Baltic model, Social Europe, neoliberalism, austerity
National Category
Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117521 (URN)9780415820035 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-04-30 Created: 2015-04-30 Last updated: 2018-05-04
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1933-3847

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