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Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Lunner, T., Rudner, M., Rosenbom, T., Ågren, J. & Ning Ng, E. H. (2016). Using Speech Recall in Hearing Aid Fitting and Outcome Evaluation Under Ecological Test Conditions. Ear and Hearing, 37(1), 145S-154S
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Speech Recall in Hearing Aid Fitting and Outcome Evaluation Under Ecological Test Conditions
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 145S-154SArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In adaptive Speech Reception Threshold (SRT) tests used in the audiological clinic, speech is presented at signal to noise ratios (SNRs) that are lower than those generally encountered in real-life communication situations. At higher, ecologically valid SNRs, however, SRTs are insensitive to changes in hearing aid signal processing that may be of benefit to listeners who are hard of hearing. Previous studies conducted in Swedish using the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall test (SWIR) have indicated that at such SNRs, the ability to recall spoken words may be a more informative measure. In the present study, a Danish version of SWIR, known as the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall Test in a New Language (SWIRL) was introduced and evaluated in two experiments. The objective of experiment 1 was to determine if the Swedish results demonstrating benefit from noise reduction signal processing for hearing aid wearers could be replicated in 25 Danish participants with mild to moderate symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. The objective of experiment 2 was to compare direct-drive and skin-drive transmission in 16 Danish users of bone-anchored hearing aids with conductive hearing loss or mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. In experiment 1, performance on SWIRL improved when hearing aid noise reduction was used, replicating the Swedish results and generalizing them across languages. In experiment 2, performance on SWIRL was better for direct-drive compared with skin-drive transmission conditions. These findings indicate that spoken word recall can be used to identify benefits from hearing aid signal processing at ecologically valid, positive SNRs where SRTs are insensitive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keywords
WORKING-MEMORY; OLDER-ADULTS; RECEPTION THRESHOLD; COGNITIVE FUNCTION; LISTENING EFFORT; NOISE-REDUCTION; INTELLIGIBILITY; BENEFIT; QUIET; SOUND
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126497 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000294 (DOI)000379372100017 ()
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Ning Ng, H., Rudner, M., Lunner, T. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Cognition in hearing aid users. In: : . Paper presented at 7th Speech in Noise Workshop (SpiN), Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-9 January 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition in hearing aid users
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive abilities vary between individuals and have been shown to be related to hearing aidbenet. How individual dierences in cognitive abilities interact with signal processing to reducelistening eort will be discussed in this presentation. Two studies were performed to investigate theeect of a hearing aid signal processing algorithm on free recall of speech heard in noise in hearingaid users, and the role of cognition. The specic aims were to develop a free recall test to measurethis eect and to test whether the eect would interact with background noise and/or individualdierences in cognitive capacity. Results demonstrated that noise impairs the ability to recall intelligiblespeech heard in noise. Noise reduction freed up cognitive resources and alleviated the negativeimpact of noise on memory when speech stimuli were presented in background noise consisting ofspeech babble. The possible underlying mechanisms are that noise reduction facilitates segregationof the auditory stream into target and irrelevant speech and reduces the capture of attention bythe linguistic information in irrelevant speech. In both studies, the eect of noise reduction on freerecall performance was modulated by individual dierences in cognitive capacity, suggesting that themechanism by which noise reduction facilitates free recall on speech heard in noise is dependent onworking memory capacity.

National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115094 (URN)
Conference
7th Speech in Noise Workshop (SpiN), Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-9 January 2015
Available from: 2015-03-08 Created: 2015-03-08 Last updated: 2017-11-06
Ng, H. N., Rudner, M., Lunner, T. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Noise reduction improves memory for target language speech in competing native but not foreign language speech. Ear and Hearing, 36(1), 82-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Noise reduction improves memory for target language speech in competing native but not foreign language speech
2015 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: A hearing aid noise reduction (NR) algorithm reduces the adverse effect of competing speech on memory for target speech for individuals with hearing impairment with high working memory capacity. In the present study, we investigated whether the positive effect of NR could be extended to individuals with low working memory capacity, as well as how NR influences recall performance for target native speech when the masker language is non-native.

Design: A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was administered to 26 experienced hearing aid users. In this test, target spoken native language (Swedish) sentence lists were presented in competing native (Swedish) or foreign (Cantonese) speech with or without binary masking NR algorithm. After each sentence list, free recall of sentence final words was prompted. Working memory capacity was measured using a reading span (RS) test.

Results: Recall performance was associated with RS. However, the benefit obtained from NR was not associated with RS. Recall performance was more disrupted by native than foreign speech babble and NR improved recall performance in native but not foreign competing speech.

Conclusions: Noise reduction improved memory for speech heard in competing speech for hearing aid users. Memory for native speech was more disrupted by native babble than foreign babble, but the disruptive effect of native speech babble was reduced to that of foreign babble when there was NR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2015
Keywords
Noise reduction, free recall, working memory, masker language, competing speech
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98284 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000080 (DOI)000346911200009 ()
Note

On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

Available from: 2013-10-07 Created: 2013-10-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Lunner, T., Ng, E., Rudner, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations. In: : . Paper presented at 6th Workshop on Speech in Noise, CNRS - Laboratoire de Mécanique et d'Acoustique, Marseille, France January 9-10 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Performance of hearing aid signal processing is often assessed by speech intelligibility in noisetests, such as the HINT, CRM, or SPIN sentences presented in a background of noise or babble.Usually these tests are most sensitive at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below 0 dB. However, in arecent study by Smeds et al. (2012) it was shown that the SNRs in ecological listening situations(e.g. kitchen, babble, and car) were typically well above 0 dB SNR. That is, SNRs where the speechintelligibility in noise tests are insensitive.Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) refers to the residual capacity after successful speech perception.In a recent study by Ng et al. (2010), we dened the residual capacity to be number of words recalledafter successful listening to a number of HINT sentences, inspired by Sarampalis et al. (2009).In a recent test with 26 hearing impaired test subjects we showed that close to 100% correctspeech intelligibility in a four talker babble noise required around + 7 dB SNR. At that SNR it wasshown that a hearing aid noise reduction scheme improved memory recall by about 10-15%. Thus,this kind of memory recall test is a possible candidate for assessment of hearing aid functionality inecologically relevant (positive) SNRs

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104967 (URN)
Conference
6th Workshop on Speech in Noise, CNRS - Laboratoire de Mécanique et d'Acoustique, Marseille, France January 9-10 2014
Available from: 2014-03-04 Created: 2014-03-04 Last updated: 2017-11-06
Ng, H. N., Classon, E., Larsby, B., Arlinger, S., Lunner, T., Rudner, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first six months of hearing aid use. Trends in Hearing, 18, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first six months of hearing aid use
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2014 (English)In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first six months of hearing aid use. Twentyseven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise (SRTs) were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at three and six months post-fitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and SRT during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first six months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of SRT when hearing aids were first fitted, but that pure-tone average hearing threshold (PTA) was the main predictor six months later. This indicates that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise before than after six months of use. We argue that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals but that as familiarization proceeds, engagement of working memory capacity is reduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
Speech recognition, cognitive abilities, working memory, acclimatization, hearing aid
National Category
Health Sciences Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98285 (URN)10.1177/2331216514558688 (DOI)000354484700002 ()
Available from: 2013-10-07 Created: 2013-10-07 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
Lunner, T., Ng, E., Rudner, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2013). Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations. In: : . Paper presented at Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping University, Sweden, June 16-19, 2013 (pp. 62-62).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond speech intelligibility testing: A memory test for assessment of signal processing interventions in ecologically valid listening situations
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Performance of hearing aid signal processing is often assessed by speech intelligibility in noise tests, such as the HINT, CRM, or SPIN sentences presented in a background of noise or babble. Usually these tests are most sensitive at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below 0 dB. However, in a recent study by Smeds et al. (2012) it was shown that the SNRs in ecological listening situations (e.g. kitchen, babble, and car) were typically well above 0 dB SNR. That is, SNRs where the speech intelligibility in noise tests are insensitive.Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) refers to the residual capacity after successful speech perception. In a recent study by Ng et al. (2010), we defined the residual capacity to be number of words recalled after successful listening to a number of HINT sentences, inspired by Sarampalis et al. (2009).In a recent test with 26 hearing impaired test subjects we showed that close to 100% correct speech intelligibility in a four talker babble noise required around + 7 dB SNR. At that SNR it was shown that a hearing aid noise reduction scheme improved memory recall by about 10-15%. Thus, this kind of memory recall test is a possible candidate for assessment of hearing aid functionality in ecologically relevant (positive) SNRs.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103052 (URN)
Conference
Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping University, Sweden, June 16-19, 2013
Available from: 2014-01-12 Created: 2014-01-12 Last updated: 2017-11-06
Ng, H. N. (2013). Cognition in Hearing Aid Users: Memory for Everyday Speech. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition in Hearing Aid Users: Memory for Everyday Speech
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Kognition hos hörapparatsanvändare : Att minnas talade vardagsmeningar
Abstract [en]

The thesis investigated the importance of cognition for speech understanding in experienced and new hearing aid users. The aims were 1) to develop a cognitive test (Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall, or SWIR test) to measure the effects of a noise reduction algorithm on processing of highly intelligible speech (everyday sentences); 2) to investigate, using the SWIR test, whether hearing aid signal processing would affect memory for heard speech in experienced hearing aid users; 3) to test whether the effects of signal processing on the ability to recall speech would interact with background noise and individual differences in working memory capacity; 4) to explore the potential clinical application of the SWIR test; and 5) to examine the relationship between cognition and speech recognition in noise in new users over the first six months of hearing aid use. Results showed that, for experienced users, noise reduction freed up cognitive resources and alleviated the negative  impact of noise on memory when speech stimuli were presented in a background of speech babble spoken in the listener’s native language. The possible underlying mechanisms are that noise reduction facilitates auditory stream segregation between target and irrelevant speech and reduces the attention captured by the linguistic information in irrelevant speech. The effects of noise reduction and SWIR performance were modulated by individual differences in working memory capacity. SWIR performance was related to the self-reported outcome of hearing aid use. For new users, working memory capacity played a more important role in speech recognition in noise before acclimatization to hearing aid amplification than after six months. This thesis demonstrates for the first time that hearing aid signal processing can significantly improve the ability of individuals with hearing impairment to recall highly intelligible speech stimuli presented in babble noise. It also adds to the literature showing the key role of working memory capacity in listening with hearing aids, especially for new users. By virtue of its relation to subjective measures of hearing aid outcome, the SWIR test can potentially be used as a tool in assessing hearing aid outcome.

Abstract [sv]

Avhandlingens övergripande mål var att studera kognitionens betydelse för talförståelse hos vana och nya hörapparatsanvändare. Syftena var att 1) utveckla ett kognitivt test (Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall, eller SWIR test) för att mäta en brusreducerande algoritms effekt på bearbetningen av tydligt tal (vardagsmeningar); 2) att med hjälp av SWIR testet undersöka huruvida hörapparatens signalbehandling påverkade återgivningen av uppfattat tal hos vana hörapparatsanvändare; 3) att utvärdera om effekten av signalbehandling på förmågan att komma ihåg tal påverkas av störande bakgrundsljud samt individuella skillnader i arbetsminnets kapacitet; 4) att undersöka den potentiella kliniska tillämpningen av SWIR testet och 5) att undersöka förhållandet mellan kognition och taluppfattning i störande bakgrundsljud hos nya hörapparatsanvändare under de första sex månaderna med hörapparater. Resultaten visade att för vana hörapparatsanvändare lindrade brusreduceringen det störande ljudets negativa inverkan på minnet när meningar presenterades i form av irrelevant tal på deltagarnas modersmål. De möjliga underliggande mekanismerna är att brusreducering underlättar diskriminering av de auditiva informationsflödena mellan det som ska uppfattas och det som är irrelevant, samt minskar graden av uppmärksamhet som fångas av den språkliga informationen i det irrelevanta talet. Effekterna av brusreducering och resultaten av SWIR var beroende av individuella skillnader i arbetsminnets kapacitet. Resultaten av SWIR har också samband med det självrapporterade utfallet av  hörapparatsanvändning. För nya användare spelar arbetsminnets kapacitet initialt en viktigare roll för taluppfattning i störande bakgrundsljud, innan anpassningen till hörapparatens förstärkning skett, än efter sex månader. Denna avhandling visar för första gången att hörapparatens signalbehandling kan signifikant förbättra möjligheten för individer med hörselnedsättning att minnas tydligt tal, som presenteras i störande bakgrundsljud. Avhandlingen bidrar till litteraturen med en diskussion om hur arbetsminnets kapacitet spelar roll i taluppfattning med hörapparat, i synnerhet för nya användare. Med stöd av dess samband med det självrapporterade utfallet, kan SWIR testet användas som redskap i bedömning av hörapparaters effekt.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013. p. 61
Series
Linköping Studies in Arts and Science, ISSN 0282-9800 ; 593Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 53
Keywords
Hearing aid, working memory, free recall, noise reduction, speech recognition, Hörapparat, arbetsminne, återgivning, brusreducering, taluppfattning
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98286 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-98286 (DOI)978-91-7519-494-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-10-29, I:101, Hus I, Campus Valla, Linköpings universietet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-10-07 Created: 2013-10-07 Last updated: 2013-10-07Bibliographically approved
Ng, H. N., Rudner, M., Lunner, T., Syskind Perdersen, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2013). Effects of noise and working memory capacity on memory processing of speech for hearing-aid users. International Journal of Audiology, 52(7), 433-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of noise and working memory capacity on memory processing of speech for hearing-aid users
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2013 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 433-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: It has been shown that noise reduction algorithms can reduce the negative effects of noise on memory processing in persons with normal hearing. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether a similar effect can be obtained for persons with hearing impairment and whether such an effect is dependent on individual differences in working memory capacity.

Design: A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was conducted in two noise backgrounds with and without noise reduction as well as in quiet. Working memory capacity was measured using a reading span (RS) test.

Study sample: Twenty-six experienced hearing-aid users with moderate to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss.

Results: Noise impaired recall performance. Competing speech disrupted memory performance more than speech-shaped noise. For late list items the disruptive effect of the competing speech background was virtually cancelled out by noise reduction for persons with high working memory capacity.

Conclusions: Noise reduction can reduce the adverse effect of noise on memory for speech for persons with good working memory capacity. We argue that the mechanism behind this is faster word identification that enhances encoding into working memory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91780 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2013.776181 (DOI)000320450800001 ()23550584 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-05-01 Created: 2013-05-01 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ng, H. N., Rudner, M., Lunner, T. & Rönnberg, J. (2013). Effects of noise reduction and competing speech on memory. In: : . Paper presented at STAF-konferens, Falun, 13-15 mars 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of noise reduction and competing speech on memory
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91781 (URN)
Conference
STAF-konferens, Falun, 13-15 mars 2013
Available from: 2013-05-01 Created: 2013-05-01 Last updated: 2017-11-06
Lunner, T. & Ng, E. (2013). Memory test at ecological SNRs. In: : . Paper presented at International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA), Elsinore, Denmark, May 27-29, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Memory test at ecological SNRs
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109775 (URN)
Conference
International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA), Elsinore, Denmark, May 27-29, 2013
Available from: 2014-08-27 Created: 2014-08-27 Last updated: 2014-09-25
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