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Åkerman, Linda
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Huus, K., Åkerman, L., Raustorp, A. & Ludvigsson, J. (2016). Physical Activity, Blood Glucose and C-Peptide in Healthy School-Children, a Longitudinal Study. PLoS ONE, 11(6), e0156401
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Activity, Blood Glucose and C-Peptide in Healthy School-Children, a Longitudinal Study
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, p. e0156401-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To further elucidate the relationship between physical activity and several risk factors for development of diabetes (glucose, C-peptide and obesity) over time. Methods A prospective longitudinal study where physical activity was measured on 199 children from Kalmar and Linkoping at age 8, and the same 107 children from Linkoping again at age 12. Anthropometric data was collected and blood was analyzed for C-peptide and f-glucose. The children in the study were representative for the general Swedish child population, and on an average lean. Results High physical activity was related to lower C-peptide at age 8 and 12. This correlation was especially pronounced in boys, who also were more physically active than girls at both time points. The association seen at 8 years of age was similar at age 12 in most children. Children with higher BMI Z-Score had a higher fasting C-peptide (age 12) but linear regression showed that children with more steps per day were less likely to have a higher fasting C-peptide irrespective of BMI. Longitudinal follow-up showed that a decrease in physical activity increased insulin resistance and beta-cell load. Conclusions Already in young children, physical activity improves insulin sensitivity and decreases the need of C-peptide over time. This seems to become even more pronounced with increasing age when children are followed longitudinally. Low physical activity increases the load on insulin producing beta-cells, might increase the risk for both type 1- and 2 diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2016
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130132 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0156401 (DOI)000377561000012 ()27270732 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Child Diabetes Foundation (Barndiabetesfonden); Novo Nordisk Foundation; Research Council of South-east Sweden (FORSS); Swedish Research Council [K2005-72X-11242-11A]; ALF/County Council of Ostergotland

Available from: 2016-07-12 Created: 2016-07-11 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Ludvigsson, J., Chéramy, M., Axelsson, S., Pihl, M., Åkerman, L. & Casas, R. (2014). GAD-treatment of children and adolescents with recent-onset Type 1 diabetes preserves residual insulin secretion after 30 months. Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, 30(5), 405-414
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GAD-treatment of children and adolescents with recent-onset Type 1 diabetes preserves residual insulin secretion after 30 months
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2014 (English)In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to analyse data from two different studies (Phase II and Phase III) regarding the safety and efficacy of treatment with alum formulated glutamic acid decarboxylase GAD65 (GAD-alum), 30 months after administration to children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes (T1D).

METHODS: The Phase II trial was a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study, including 70 children and adolescents which were followed for 30 months. Participants received a subcutaneous injection of either 20 µg of GAD-alum or placebo at baseline and one month later. During a subsequent larger European Phase III trial including three treatment arms, participants received two or four subcutaneous injections of either 20 µg of GAD-alum and/or placebo at baseline, 1, 3 and 9 months. The Phase III trial was prematurely interrupted at 15 months, but of the 148 Swedish patients, a majority completed the 21 months follow-up and 45 patients completed the trial at 30 months. Both studies included GADA-positive patients with fasting C-peptide ≥0.10 nmol/l. We have now combined the results of these two trials.

RESULTS: There were no treatment related adverse events. In patients treated with 2 GAD-alum doses, stimulated C-peptide AUC had decreased significantly less (9 m: p < 0.037; 15 m p < 0.032; 21 m p < 0.003 and 30 m p < 0.004) and a larger proportion of these patients were also able to achieve a peak stimulated C-peptide >0.2 nmol/l (p < 0.05), as compared to placebo.

CONCLUSION: Treatment with two doses of GAD-alum in children and adolescents with recent-onset T1D shows no adverse events and preserves residual insulin secretion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
arrays; celiac disease; children; gene expression; gluten-free diet; IL-17; mucosa; Th17
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108613 (URN)10.1002/dmrr.2503 (DOI)000339416900007 ()24302596 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-07-01 Created: 2014-07-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, S., Cheramy, M., Åkerman, L., Pihl, M., Ludvigsson, J. & Casas, R. (2013). Cellular and Humoral Immune responses in Type 1 Diabetic patients participating in a Phase III GAD-alum Intervention Trial. Diabetes Care, 36(11), 3418-3424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cellular and Humoral Immune responses in Type 1 Diabetic patients participating in a Phase III GAD-alum Intervention Trial
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2013 (English)In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 3418-3424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVEGAD formulated in aluminum hydroxide (GAD-alum) has previously been shown to induce preservation of residual insulin secretion in recent-onset type 1 diabetes, but recent phase II and III GAD-alum trials failed to reach primary outcomes. The European phase III study was therefore closed after 15 months, and only a minority of patients completed the 30 months of follow-up.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThis study aimed to characterize cellular and humoral responses in the Swedish patients (n = 148) participating in the phase III trial, receiving four (4D) or two (2D) GAD-alum doses or placebo. Serum GAD(65) antibody (GADA) levels, GADA IgG1-4 subclass distribution, cytokine secretion, and proliferative responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were analyzed.RESULTSThe GAD(65)-induced cytokine profile tended to switch toward a predominant Th2-associated profile over time both in the 2D and 4D group. The groups also displayed increased GADA levels and PBMC proliferation compared with placebo, whereas GADA IgG subclass distribution changed in 4D patients.CONCLUSIONSBoth 2D and 4D patients displayed GAD(65)-specifc cellular and humoral effects after GAD-alum treatment, but at different time points and magnitudes. No specific immune markers could be associated with treatment efficacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Diabetes Association, 2013
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99798 (URN)10.2337/dc12-2251 (DOI)000326274100013 ()23863909 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Åkerman, L., Ludvigsson, J. & Casas, R. (2013). Low C-peptide levels and decreased expression of TNF and CD45 in children with high risk of type 1 diabetes. Clinical Immunology, 148(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low C-peptide levels and decreased expression of TNF and CD45 in children with high risk of type 1 diabetes
2013 (English)In: Clinical Immunology, ISSN 1521-6616, E-ISSN 1521-7035, Vol. 148, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients have numeral and functional defects in peripheral immune cells, but the pre-diabetic period is fairly uncharacterized. Our aim was to analyze expression of immunological markers in T1D high risk children and relate it to clinical/immunological parameters. Children from ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden) with greater than= 2 diabetes related autoantibodies were considered at high risk. Age-matched controls and new-onset T1D patients were included. Expression of genes related to immune cell function and different arms of the immune system was assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells using PCR array. Risk children had lower TNF and CD45, and although there were few differences between the groups, expression of many genes differed when comparing children with regard to residual insulin secretion. Hence, expression of immune related genes seemed related not only to the autoimmune process but rather to residual beta-cell function, which was decreased already during the pre-diabetic phase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Type 1 diabetes; Gene expression; PBMC; T1D high risk; T1D autoantibodies; PCR array
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96458 (URN)10.1016/j.clim.2013.03.011 (DOI)000320427300002 ()
Available from: 2013-08-23 Created: 2013-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Pihl, M., Åkerman, L., Axelsson, S., Chéramy, M., Hjorth, M., Mallone, R., . . . Casas, R. (2013). Regulatory T cell phenotype and function 4 years after GAD–alum treatment in children with type 1 diabetes. Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 172(3), 394-402
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulatory T cell phenotype and function 4 years after GAD–alum treatment in children with type 1 diabetes
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2013 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 172, no 3, p. 394-402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65 formulated with aluminium hydroxide (GAD-alum) was effective in preserving insulin secretion in a Phase II clinical trial in children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes. In addition, GAD-alum treated patients increased CD4+CD25hi forkhead box protein 3+ (FoxP3+) cell numbers in response to in-vitro GAD65 stimulation. We have carried out a 4-year follow-up study of 59 of the original 70 patients to investigate long-term effects on the frequency and function of regulatory T cells after GAD-alum treatment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated in vitro with GAD65 for 7 days and expression of regulatory T cell markers was measured by flow cytometry. Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25hiCD127lo) and effector T cells (CD4+CD25CD127+) were further sorted, expanded and used in suppression assays to assess regulatory T cell function after GAD-alum treatment. GAD-alum-treated patients displayed higher frequencies of in-vitro GAD65-induced CD4+CD25+CD127+ as well as CD4+CD25hiCD127lo and CD4+FoxP3+ cells compared to placebo. Moreover, GAD65 stimulation induced a population of CD4hi cells consisting mainly of CD25+CD127+, which was specific of GAD-alum-treated patients (16 of 25 versus one of 25 in placebo). Assessment of suppressive function in expanded regulatory T cells revealed no difference between GAD-alum- and placebo-treated individuals. Regulatory T cell frequency did not correlate with C-peptide secretion throughout the study. In conclusion, GAD-alum treatment induced both GAD65-reactive CD25+CD127+ and CD25hiCD127lo cells, but no difference in regulatory T cell function 4 years after GAD-alum treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
CD4 T cells (T helper, Th0, Th1, Th2, Th3, Th17), diabetes, immune regulation, regulatory T cells (Treg), therapy/immunotherapy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93379 (URN)10.1111/cei.12078 (DOI)000318073000004 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|K2008-55x-20652-01-3|Swedish Child Diabetes Foundation (Barndiabetesfonden)||Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||JDRF|1-2008-106|Ile-de-France CODDIM||Inserm Avenir Program||

Available from: 2013-05-31 Created: 2013-05-31 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, S., Chéramy, M., Hjorth, M., Pihl, M., Åkerman, L., Martinuzzi, E., . . . Casas, R. (2011). Long-Lasting Immune Responses 4 Years after GAD-Alum Treatment in Children with Type 1 Diabetes. PLoS ONE, 6(12)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Lasting Immune Responses 4 Years after GAD-Alum Treatment in Children with Type 1 Diabetes
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2011 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A phase II clinical trial with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 formulated with aluminium hydroxide (GAD-alum) has shown efficacy in preserving residual insulin secretion in children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have performed a 4-year follow-up study of 59 of the original 70 patients to investigate long-term cellular and humoral immune responses after GAD-alum-treatment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated in vitro with GAD(65). Frequencies of naive, central and effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were measured, together with cytokine secretion, proliferation, gene expression and serum GAD(65) autoantibody (GADA) levels. We here show that GAD-alum-treated patients display increased memory T-cell frequencies and prompt T-cell activation upon in vitro stimulation with GAD(65), but not with control antigens, compared with placebo subjects. GAD(65)-induced T-cell activation was accompanied by secretion of T helper (Th) 1, Th2 and T regulatory cytokines and by induction of T-cell inhibitory pathways. Moreover, post-treatment serum GADA titres remained persistently increased in the GAD-alum arm, but did not inhibit GAD(65) enzymatic activity. In conclusion, memory T- and B-cell responses persist 4 years after GAD-alum-treatment. In parallel to a GAD(65)-induced T-cell activation, our results show induction of T-cell inhibitory pathways important for regulating the GAD(65) immunity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74156 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0029008 (DOI)000298366600057 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|K2008-55x-20652-01-3|Swedish Child Diabetes Foundation (Barndiabetesfonden)||Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden||Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF)|1-2008-106|Ile-de-France CODDIM||Inserm Avenir Program||Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Axelsson, S., Hjorth, M., Åkerman, L., Ludvigsson, J. & Casas, R. (2010). Early induction of GAD(65)-reactive Th2 response in type 1 diabetic children treated with alum-formulated GAD(65). Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, 26(7), 559-568
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early induction of GAD(65)-reactive Th2 response in type 1 diabetic children treated with alum-formulated GAD(65)
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2010 (English)In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 559-568Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background We have previously shown that two injections of 20 mu g alum-formulated glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD(65)) (GAD-alum; Diamyd (R)) in children with recent-onset type 1 diabetes lead to preservation of residual insulin secretion. In vitro cytokine production at the 15 months follow-up indicated immunomodulation. In the present study, we took advantage of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, cryopreserved during early follow-ups, to investigate whether the immunomodulatory effect of GAD-alum was apparent earlier after treatment, preceding the changes previously reported at 15 months.<p>Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 70 type 1 diabetic children, randomly assigned GAD-alum (n = 35) or placebo (n = 35), that had been frozen at baseline (n = 27) and after 1 (n = 58), 3 (n = 67) and 9 (n = 66) months, were stimulated in vitro with GAD(65), tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 peptide, insulin peptide, GAD-alum, alum formulation or phytohaemagglutinin. Interleukin (IL)-5, -6, -10, -12, -13, -17, tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma were measured in cell supernatants and serum samples using Luminex. Expression of FOXP3 and transforming growth factor-beta was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.</p><p>Results Already 1 month after the first injection, GAD(65)-induced IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 were enhanced in GAD-alum-treated patients compared to those with placebo. The in vitro response at 3 and 9 months was characterized by a broader range of cytokines in the treated group. Notably, only the T-helper 2-associated cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 increased continuously over time.</p><p>Conclusions Treatment with GAD-alum in type 1 diabetic children induced an early T-helper 2 immune enhanced response to GAD(65), followed by a wider spectrum of cytokines at 3 and 9 months. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.</p>

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons, 2010
Keywords
GAD65, Immunotherapy, Th1/Th2 Immune Response, Immunomodulation, Cytokines
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52141 (URN)10.1002/dmrr.1126 (DOI)000283399000007 ()
Available from: 2009-12-07 Created: 2009-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Chéramy, M., Axelsson, S., Åkerman, L., Pihl, M., Ludvigsson, J. & Casas, R. GAD65 autoantibody (GADA) responses in Type 1 diabetes patients participating in a phase III GAD-alum intervention trial.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GAD65 autoantibody (GADA) responses in Type 1 diabetes patients participating in a phase III GAD-alum intervention trial
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa isoform (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although aluminum-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) induced preservation of residual insulin secretion in a previous clinical phase II trial, recent phase II and III trials failed to reach their primary end-points. The European phase III trial was therefore closed after 15 months, and the entire study period was completed only for a minority of the patients. This study aimed to characterize GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and Tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 autoantibody (IA-2A) levels, GADA IgG1-4 subclass distribution, B-cell frequencies/phenotypes and cytokine secretion. We also assessed whether GAD-alum preserved β-cell function in the small subgroup of Swedish patients who completed the 30 months visit. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected at baseline and after 1, 3, 9, 15 and 21 months from the 148 Swedish subjects included in the trial, and also at 30 months from the 45 patients who reached the final visit. Patients were randomly assigned to; i) 4 doses of GAD-alum (4D), ii) 2 doses of GAD-alum followed by two doses of placebo (2D), or iii) 4 doses of placebo.

GADA titers were induced both in the 4D and 2D group compared to placebo, and 4D patients also displayed a higher GADA fold-change after receiving the  two additional injections compared to the 2D group. The 4D group switched to a higher frequency of GADA IgG4, associated to a Th2 type response at 9 months, whereas an association between GADA fold-change and GAD65-induced in vitro cytokine secretion was observed in the 2D group. These findings suggest that the humoral response, induced by the 2D treatment,  seems to be associated with a GAD65-specific cellular response, while 4D induces a distinct humoral response. Even though GADA titers were elevated, no changes in B-cell frequencies or phenotype were observed in any group. IA-2A levels declined at a similar rate in all groups during the trial.The subgroup of patients who completed the 30 month visit receiving 2 doses of GAD-alum had less decline of both fasting and stimulated C-peptide after 30 months compared to placebo. These results support the concept of GAD-alum treatment, but no specific immune markers have been identified.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84841 (URN)
Available from: 2012-10-24 Created: 2012-10-24 Last updated: 2012-10-24Bibliographically approved
Axelsson, S., Chéramy, M., Åkerman, L., Pihl, M., Ludvigsson, J. & Casas, R. Preserved C-peptide 30 months after GAD-alum treatment of children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes, and its relation to immune markers.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preserved C-peptide 30 months after GAD-alum treatment of children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes, and its relation to immune markers
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa isoform (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although alum-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) induced preservation of residual insulin secretion in a previous clinical Phase II trial, recent Phase II and Phase III trials failed to reach their primary end-points. The European Phase III trial was therefore closed after 15 months, and the 30 months follow-up period was completed only for a minority of the patients. This study aimed to assess whether GAD-alum preserved β-cell function in those recent-onset T1D patients who completed their 30 months visit in the European Phase III trial, and to characterize their GAD65-induced cytokine secretion and proliferation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated at baseline and after 1, 3, 9, 15 and 21 months from the 148 Swedish subjects included in the Phase III GAD-alum trial, and also at 30 months from 45 patients who had reached the final visit before the trial was closed. Patients had been randomly assigned into three arms: 4 doses of GAD-alum (4D), 2 doses of GAD-alum followed by two doses of placebo (2D), or 4 doses of placebo. Cytokine secretion was detected in cell culture supernatants by Luminex, after 7 days of in vitro culture. Cell proliferation was determined by 3H thymidine incorporation assay. Fasting and stimulated C-peptide was analysed in serum.

Patients treated with 2 doses of GAD-alum had less decline of both fasting (p=0.040) and stimulated C-peptide (p=0.012) after 30 months, and a larger proportion of these patients preserved >25% of their initial stimulated C-peptide AUC compared to placebo (p=0.012). Both 2D and 4D patients showed increased PBMC proliferation to GAD65 and a cytokine profile that tended to switch towards a more predominant Th2 associated profile over time.

The results support the concept of GAD-alum treatment, but no specific immune markers have been identified.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77746 (URN)
Available from: 2012-05-28 Created: 2012-05-28 Last updated: 2012-05-28Bibliographically approved
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