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Haglund, Jesper
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Haglund, J., Jeppsson, F. & Schönborn, K. (2016). Taking on the Heat—a Narrative Account of How Infrared Cameras Invite Instant Inquiry. Research in science education, 46(5), 685-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking on the Heat—a Narrative Account of How Infrared Cameras Invite Instant Inquiry
2016 (English)In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 685-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Integration of technology, social learning and scientific models offers pedagogical opportunities for science education. A particularly interesting area is thermal science, where students often struggle with abstract concepts, such as heat. In taking on this conceptual obstacle, we explore how hand-held infrared (IR) visualization technology can strengthen students’ understanding of thermal phenomena. Grounded in the Swedish physics curriculum and part of a broader research programme on educational uses of IR cameras, we have developed laboratory exercises around a thermal storyline, in conjunction with the teaching of a heat-flow model. We report a narrative analysis of how a group of five fourth-graders, facilitated by a researcher, predicts, observes and explains (POE) how the temperatures change when they pour hot water into a ceramic coffee mug and a thin plastic cup. Four chronological episodes are described and analysed as group interaction unfolded. Results revealed that the students engaged cognitively and emotionally with the POE task and, in particular, held a sustained focus on making observations and offering explanations for the scenarios. A compelling finding was the group’s spontaneous generation of multiple "what-ifs" in relation to thermal phenomena, such as blowing on the water surface, or submerging a pencil into the hot water. This was followed by immediate interrogation with the IR camera, a learning event we label instant inquiry. The students’ expressions largely reflected adoption of the heat-flow model. In conclusion, IR cameras could serve as an access point for even very young students to develop complex thermal concepts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Infrared cameras, Primary school, Heat, Temperature, Predict-observe-explain, Instant inquiry
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119705 (URN)10.1007/s11165-015-9476-8 (DOI)000382910600004 ()
Projects
ThermalVis
Note

As per the Springer Copyright agreement, a Postprint of the Accepted Manuscript (PDF) is available via the personal website of the author(s) at the following link:

http://webstaff.itn.liu.se/~konsc/Haglund_Jeppsson_Schonborn_2015_Postprint

Available from: 2015-06-24 Created: 2015-06-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Haglund, J., Jeppsson, F. & Ahrenberg, L. (2015). Taking advantage of the "Big Mo": Momentum in everyday english and swedish and in physics teaching. Research in science education, 45(3), 345-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking advantage of the "Big Mo": Momentum in everyday english and swedish and in physics teaching
2015 (English)In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 345-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Science education research suggests that our everyday intuitions of motion and interaction of physical objects fit well with how physicists use the term “momentum”. Corpus linguistics provides an easily accessible approach to study language in different domains, including everyday language. Analysis of language samples from English text corpora reveals a trend of increasing metaphorical use of “momentum” in non-science domains, and through conceptual metaphor analysis, we show that the use of the word in everyday language, as opposed to for instance “force”, is largely adequate from a physics point of view. In addition, “momentum” has recently been borrowed into Swedish as a metaphor in domains such as sports, politics and finance, with meanings similar to those in physics. As an implication for educational practice, we find support for the suggestion to introduce the term “momentum” to English-speaking pupils at an earlier age than what is typically done in the educational system today, thereby capitalising on their intuitions and experiences of everyday language. For Swedish-speaking pupils, and possibly also relevant to other languages, the parallel between “momentum” and the corresponding physics term in the students’ mother tongue could be made explicit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2015
Keywords
Momentum, Corpus linguistics, Conceptual metaphor, Science education, Physics
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109311 (URN)10.1007/s11165-014-9426-x (DOI)000355182800002 ()
Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Haglund, J. & Jeppsson, F. (2014). Confronting conceptual challenges in thermodynamics by use of self-generated analogies. Science & Education, 23(7), 1505-1529
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Confronting conceptual challenges in thermodynamics by use of self-generated analogies
2014 (English)In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 1505-1529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Use of self-generated analogies has been proposed as a method for students to learn about a new subject by reference to what they previously know, in line with a constructivist perspective on learning and a resource perspective on conceptual change. We report on a group exercise on using completion problems in combination with self-generated analogies to make sense of two thermodynamic processes. The participants (N = 8) were preservice physics teacher students at the fourth year of the teacher education program. The students experienced challenges in accounting for the constant entropy in reversible, adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas and the constant temperature in free, adiabatic expansion of an ideal gas. These challenges were found to be grounded in the students’ intuitive understanding of the phenomena. In order to come to terms with the constant entropy in the first process, the students developed idiosyncratic explanations, but these could by properly adjusted given suitable scaffolding. In contrast, the students by themselves managed to make sense of the constant temperature in free expansion, by use of microscopic explanatory models. As a conclusion, self-generated analogies were found to provide a useful approach to identifying challenges to understanding among students, but also for the students to come to terms with these challenges. The results are discussed against a background of different perspectives on the issue of conceptual change in science education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2014
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95842 (URN)10.1007/s11191-013-9630-5 (DOI)000338211300007 ()
Available from: 2013-07-29 Created: 2013-07-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Haglund, J., Jeppsson, F. & Andersson, J. (2014). Primary school childrens´s ideas of mixing and heat as expressed in a classroom setting. Journal of Baltic Science Education, 13(5), 726-739
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary school childrens´s ideas of mixing and heat as expressed in a classroom setting
2014 (English)In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 726-739Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates primary school children’s (7-8 year-old, N = 25) ideas of mixing of marbles and of heat, expressed in small-group predict-observe-explain exercises, and drawings representing the children’s own analogies in a classroom setting. The children were typically found to predict that marbles of two different colours would mix when rocked back and forth on a board. This idea of mixing is slightly more advanced than previously reported in the literature. The children’s ideas of heat included reference to warm objects, their own bodies when exercising, and the process of one warm solid object heating another object in direct contact. In addition, through scaffolding, some of the children expressed a substance view of heat. Finally, the potential and challenges in probing children’s ideas through a combination of data collection techniques in a classroom setting are reflected upon

Keywords
heat, mixing, children’s ideas, primary school, classroom setting
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112423 (URN)000347033100011 ()
Available from: 2014-11-26 Created: 2014-11-26 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Schönborn, K., Haglund, J. & Xie, C. (2014). Pupils' early explorations of thermoimaging to interpret heat and temperature. Journal of Baltic Science Education, 13(1), 118-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pupils' early explorations of thermoimaging to interpret heat and temperature
2014 (English)In: Journal of Baltic Science Education, ISSN 1648-3898, E-ISSN 2538-7138, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 118-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In thermodynamics teaching, pupils have been found to confuse temperature and heat, and to conceive touch as an infallible thermometer. This study explored the potential of combining the sense of touch with infrared (IR) thermal imaging on pupils’ understanding of heat and temperature. Eight 7th-grade pupils (12-13 years old) worked in pairs across three laboratory exercises (real-time IR imaging, static IR images, or thermometers) to predict, observe and explain (POE) the temperatures of different objects. An anomaly between perceived ‘coldness’ and measured temperature was induced among the pupils, but they did not manage to resolve this cognitive conflict. The pupils observed the objects getting warmer and increasing in temperature, but did not explain the experiments as involving a heat flow from their bodies to the objects. Successful explanation might require a combination of thermal imaging and the explicit introduction of a simple heat-flow model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Siauliai, Lithuania: Scientia Socialis, 2014
Keywords
cognitive conflict, multisensory experience, predict-observe-explain (POE), thermal imaging
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105174 (URN)000334107400010 ()
Projects
ThermalVis
Available from: 2014-03-11 Created: 2014-03-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Haglund, J. (2013). Collaborative and self-generated analogies in science education. Studies in science education, 49(1), 35-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative and self-generated analogies in science education
2013 (English)In: Studies in science education, ISSN 0305-7267, E-ISSN 1940-8412, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 35-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has long been recognised that analogies may be a useful tool in science education. At the same time, it has been found that there are challenges to using analogies in teaching. For example, students might not identify a suitable analogy, might not recognise how the taught target domain is similar to the source domain to which it is compared, or may fail to realise where the analogy breaks down. The present study offers a review of two trends which reflect the ambition to come to terms with such challenges: self-generated analogies, making use of students’ own analogies in teaching, and analogy generation in collaborative settings, such as in small-group work. Empirical studies show predominately positive results with regard to students’ enjoyment and learning gains, and point to opportunities for formative assessment. The specificities of language in conjunction with analogy and the role of analogies in authentic science classroom discourse are suggested as areas of study that deserve more attention going forward.

Keywords
analogical reasoning, spontaneous analogy, self-generated analogy, collaboration, production paradigm
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-92715 (URN)10.1080/03057267.2013.801119 (DOI)000322615000002 ()
Available from: 2013-05-16 Created: 2013-05-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Jeppsson, F., Haglund, J., Amin, T. & Strömdahl, H. (2013). Exploring the Use of Conceptual Metaphors in Solving Problems on Entropy. The Journal of the learning sciences, 22(1), 70-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Use of Conceptual Metaphors in Solving Problems on Entropy
2013 (English)In: The Journal of the learning sciences, ISSN 1050-8406, E-ISSN 1532-7809, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 70-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A growing body of research has examined the experiential grounding of scientific thought and the role of experiential intuitive knowledge in science learning. Meanwhile, research in cognitive linguistics has identified many conceptual metaphors (CMs), metaphorical mappings between abstract concepts and experiential source domains, implicit in everyday and scientific language. However, the contributions of CMs to scientific understanding and reasoning are still not clear. This study explores the roles that CMs play in scientific problem-solving through a detailed analysis of two physical chemistry PhD students solving problems on entropy. We report evidence in support of three claims: a range of CMs are used in problem-solving enabling flexible, experiential construals of abstract scientific concepts; CMs are coordinated with one another and other resources supporting the alignment of qualitative and quantitative reasoning; use of CMs grounds abstract reasoning in a “narrative” discourse incorporating conceptions of paths, agents, and movement. We conclude that CMs should be added to the set of intuitive resources others have suggested contribute to expertise in science. This proposal is consistent with two assumptions: that cognition is embodiment and that internal cognitive structures and processes interact with semiotic systems. The implications of the findings for learning and instruction are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2013
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79910 (URN)10.1080/10508406.2012.691926 (DOI)000312584600005 ()
Available from: 2012-08-15 Created: 2012-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Haglund, J. & Jeppsson, F. (2013). Inledning (1ed.). In: Fredrik Jeppsson & Jesper Haglund (Ed.), Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning: (pp. 13-38). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inledning
2013 (Swedish)In: Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning / [ed] Fredrik Jeppsson & Jesper Haglund, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 13-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Elever kan bara lära sig nya saker genom att bygga på det de redan vet och sina tidigare erfarenheter. Detta är en viktig utgångspunkt i konstruktivismen. Samtidigt är naturvetenskapen ofta abstrakt till sin karaktär. Hur kan vi som lärare skapa miljöer och situationer i naturvetenskapsundervisningen där våra elever ges möjlighet att dra nytta av sina tidigare kunskaper och inne­boende resurser? Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att använda sig av modeller, analogier och metaforer i undervisningen.

I denna antologi presenteras forskning och undervisningsexempel kring hur man kan använda modeller, analogier och metaforer, samt elevers egna representationer i undervisningen i fysik, kemi och biologi.

Antologin vänder sig främst till blivande och verksamma lärare i ­naturvetenskap med fokus på grundskolans senare år och gymnasiet, samt lärarutbildningen i naturvetenskapliga ämnen och deras didaktik.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013 Edition: 1
Keywords
Models and modelmaking, Analogy, Naturvetenskapsundervisning, metodik, Analogi, Modeller
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102276 (URN)978-91-44-09000-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2014-10-13Bibliographically approved
Jeppsson, F. & Haglund, J. (Eds.). (2013). Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning (1ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning
2013 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Elever kan bara lära sig nya saker genom att bygga på det de redan vet och sina tidigare erfarenheter. Detta är en viktig utgångspunkt i konstruktivismen. Samtidigt är naturvetenskapen ofta abstrakt till sin karaktär. Hur kan vi som lärare skapa miljöer och situationer i naturvetenskapsundervisningen där våra elever ges möjlighet att dra nytta av sina tidigare kunskaper och inne­boende resurser? Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att använda sig av modeller, analogier och metaforer i undervisningen.

I denna antologi presenteras forskning och undervisningsexempel kring hur man kan använda modeller, analogier och metaforer, samt elevers egna representationer i undervisningen i fysik, kemi och biologi.

Antologin vänder sig främst till blivande och verksamma lärare i ­naturvetenskap med fokus på grundskolans senare år och gymnasiet, samt lärarutbildningen i naturvetenskapliga ämnen och deras didaktik.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013. p. 226 Edition: 1
Keywords
Models and modelmaking, Analogy, Naturvetenskapsundervisning metodik, Analogi, Modeller
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102275 (URN)978-91-44-09000-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2014-10-17Bibliographically approved
Haglund, J. (2013). Självgenererade analogier stöder lärande (1ed.). In: Fredrik Jeppsson & Jesper Haglund (Ed.), Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning: (pp. 185-199). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Självgenererade analogier stöder lärande
2013 (Swedish)In: Modeller, analogier och metaforer i naturvetenskapsundervisning / [ed] Fredrik Jeppsson & Jesper Haglund, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 185-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Elever kan bara lära sig nya saker genom att bygga på det de redan vet och sina tidigare erfarenheter. Detta är en viktig utgångspunkt i konstruktivismen. Samtidigt är naturvetenskapen ofta abstrakt till sin karaktär. Hur kan vi som lärare skapa miljöer och situationer i naturvetenskapsundervisningen där våra elever ges möjlighet att dra nytta av sina tidigare kunskaper och inne­boende resurser? Ett sätt att åstadkomma detta är att använda sig av modeller, analogier och metaforer i undervisningen.

I denna antologi presenteras forskning och undervisningsexempel kring hur man kan använda modeller, analogier och metaforer, samt elevers egna representationer i undervisningen i fysik, kemi och biologi.

Antologin vänder sig främst till blivande och verksamma lärare i ­naturvetenskap med fokus på grundskolans senare år och gymnasiet, samt lärarutbildningen i naturvetenskapliga ämnen och deras didaktik.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013 Edition: 1
Keywords
Models and modelmaking, Analogy, Naturvetenskapsundervisning, metodik, Analogi, Modeller
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102277 (URN)978-91-44-09000-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2014-10-13Bibliographically approved
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