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Aho, N., Gren Landell, M. & Svedin, C. G. (2016). The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 31(4), 620-651
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Prevalence of Potentially Victimizing Events, Poly-Victimization, and Its Association to Sociodemographic Factors: A Swedish Youth Survey
2016 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 620-651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studying the extent to which children are exposed to victimizing events is important to fully understand the effect of such exposure in shaping them as adults. The aim of this study was to use self-report by adolescents to measure the prevalence of victimizing events and of poly-victimization. A representative sample of 5,960 students (aged 17) from high schools in Sweden was given the self-administrated version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) along with questions concerning gender, birthplace, parents birthplace and employment, residence, educational program, and municipality size. The results show that 84.1% (83.0% young men and 85.2% young women) of the students had experienced victimization during their lifetime, and 10.3% were categorized as poly-victims (8.1% young men and 12.5% young women; OR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.35, 1.94]). Adolescents living with both parents were at lower risk of any form of victimization for both genders, while females were at higher risk of maltreatment, peer victimization, and, most significantly, sexual victimization. In conclusion, the vast majority of young people have been victimized during their lifetime. A greater awareness of the impact of these victimizing events on children and adolescents is important as a basis for providing a safer milieu and establishing better interventions, especially for those that have been victimized on multiple occasions. The high-exposure group was determined by using 10 events as a cutoff. Findings on this group corresponded with findings in other international studies regarding distribution, elevated risk for females, and the possibility of limiting the effects of victimization by modifying living conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2016
Keywords
JVQ; victim; youth; poly-victimization; sociodemographics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124456 (URN)10.1177/0886260514556105 (DOI)000367838200004 ()25392393 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority in Sweden; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-02-21
Comasco, E., Gustafsson, P., Sydsjö, G., Agnafors, S., Aho, N. & Svedin, C. G. (2015). Psychiatric symptoms in adolescents: FKBP5 genotype-early life adversity interaction effects. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 24(12), 1473-1483
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychiatric symptoms in adolescents: FKBP5 genotype-early life adversity interaction effects
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2015 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1473-1483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychiatric disorders are multi-factorial and their symptoms overlap. Constitutional and environmental factors influence each other, and this contributes to risk and resilience in mental ill-health. We investigated functional genetic variation of stress responsiveness, assessed as FKBP5 genotype, in relation to early life adversity and mental health in two samples of adolescents. One population-based sample of 909 12-year-old adolescents was assessed using the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events scale and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. One sample of 398 17-year-old adolescents, enriched for poly-victimized individuals (USSS), was assessed using the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire and the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC). The FKBP5 rs1360780 and rs3800373 polymorphisms were genotyped using a fluorescence-based competitive allele-specific PCR. Most prominently among poly-victimized older male adolescents, the least common alleles of the polymorphisms, in interaction with adverse life events, were associated with psychiatric symptoms, after controlling for ethno-socio-economic factors. The interaction effect between rs3800373 and adverse life events on the TSCC sub-scales-anxiety, depression, anger, and dissociation-and with the rs1360780 on dissociation in the USSS cohort remained significant after Bonferroni correction. This pattern of association is in line with the findings of clinical and neuroimaging studies, and implies interactive effects of FKBP5 polymorphisms and early life environment on several psychiatric symptoms. These correlates add up to provide constructs that are relevant to several psychiatric symptoms, and to identify early predictors of mental ill-health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
Keywords
Adolescents; FKBP5; Gene; Mental health; Stress
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123510 (URN)10.1007/s00787-015-0768-3 (DOI)000365191700005 ()26424511 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Crime Victim Compensation and Support Authority [09042/2008]; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2011-0627]; Uppsala University

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2018-02-21Bibliographically approved
Gren Landell, M., Aho, N., Carlsson, E., Jones, A. & Svedin, C. G. (2013). Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 22(3), 177-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posttraumatic stress symptoms and mental health services utilization in adolescents with social anxiety disorder and experiences of victimization
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2013 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 177-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent findings from studies on adults show similarities between social anxiety disorder (SAD) and posttraumatic stress in the form of recurrent memories and intrusive and distressing images of earlier aversive events. Further, treatment models for SAD in adults have been successfully developed by using transdiagnostic knowledge on posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Studies on adolescents are though missing. The present study aimed at exploring the association between PTSS and SAD in Swedish adolescents. A second aim was to study mental health services utilization in relation to these conditions. A total of 5,960 high-school students participated and reported on SAD, life time victimization, PTSS and mental health service utilization. Socially anxious adolescents reported significantly higher levels of PTSS than adolescents not reporting SAD and this difference was seen in victimized as well as non-victimized subjects. Contact with a school counselor was the most common mental health service utilization in subjects with SAD and those with elevated PTSS. In the prediction of contact with a CAP-clinic, significant odds ratios were found for a condition of SAD and elevated PTSS (OR = 4.88, 95 % CI = 3.53–6.73) but not for SAD only. Screening of PTSS in adolescents with SAD is recommended. The service of school counselors is important in detecting and helping young people with SAD and elevated PTSS. Clinical studies on SAD and PTSS in adolescents could aid in modifying treatment models for SAD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Social anxiety disorder, victimization, mental health service utilization, adolescents
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89939 (URN)10.1007/s00787-012-0336-z (DOI)000315736200005 ()
Available from: 2013-03-11 Created: 2013-03-11 Last updated: 2018-02-21
Gren-Landell, M., Aho, N., Andersson, G. & Svedin, C. G. (2011). Social anxiety disorder and victimization in a community sample of adolescents. Journal of Adolescence, 34(3), 569-577
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social anxiety disorder and victimization in a community sample of adolescents
2011 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 569-577Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite high prevalence rates of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and high rates of victimization in adolescents, studies on the relationship between these phenomena are missing. In the present study we report associations between SAD and multiple victimization experiences in a community sample of adolescents. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3211 Swedish high-school students. The prevalence rate of self-reported SAD was 10.6% (n=340). Significantly higher rates of lifetime victimization was found in subjects with self-reported SAD compared to non-cases, on the total score on the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire, and on the subscales maltreatment, sexual victimization and victimization from peer/siblings. Different results emerged due to gender. In females, maltreatment and sexual victimization was associated with an increased risk of SAD and, in males sexual victimization increased the risk of reporting SAD. Further studies are needed to elaborate developmental models on SAD and to add to modification of prevention- and treatment interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
Keywords
Social anxiety disorder, Adolescents, Victimization, Gender
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-57936 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2010.03.007 (DOI)20416944 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-07-09 Created: 2010-07-09 Last updated: 2018-02-21
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6686-937x

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