liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Kues, J. N., Janda, C., Krzikalla, C., Andersson, G. & Weise, C. (2018). The effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the report of positive and negative premenstrual changes.. Women & health, 58(1), 16-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the report of positive and negative premenstrual changes.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 16-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although women predominantly report negative premenstrual changes, a substantial portion of women also reports positive changes. Little is known about factors related to report of positive and negative premenstrual changes. The aim of this experimental study at the Philipps-University of Marburg from January and February 2015 was to investigate the effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the retrospective report of premenstrual changes. A total of 241 healthy women were randomly assigned either to an experimental group (EG) reading: (1) text focusing on negative and positive premenstrual changes (EG1 (+/-)); (2) text focusing on negative changes (EG2 (-)); or (3) control group (CG) text. At least one positive premenstrual change was reported by the majority of the participating women. The results of the MANOVA and discriminant analysis showed that, after having read the text, EG2 (-) reported more negative and fewer positive premenstrual changes in a retrospective screening compared to EG1 (+/-) and CG. No significant difference was observed between EG1 (+/-) and CG. The results show the negative influence of information focusing on negative premenstrual changes on the retrospective report of both negative and positive premenstrual changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Expectations, information, menstruation, positive premenstrual changes, premenstrual syndrome
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143854 (URN)10.1080/03630242.2016.1263274 (DOI)000428206400002 ()27892822 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85006930893 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved
Janda, C., Kues, J. N., Andersson, G., Kleinstäuber, M. & Weise, C. (2017). A symptom diary to assess severe premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Women & health, 57(7), 837-854
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A symptom diary to assess severe premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 837-854Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The differentiation between premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has been widely discussed. PMDD is listed as a mental disorder in the DSM-5, whereas PMS is not considered as a mental disorder in any diagnostic manual. Consequently, PMS is operationalized in different ways. Keeping a symptom diary is required to diagnose PMDD but is also recommended for PMS. The aim of our study was, therefore, to operationalize PMS and PMDD within a DSM-5-based symptom diary. We developed a symptom-intensity-score (SI-score) and an interference-score (INT-score) to evaluate the symptom diary. Ninety-eight women (aged 20-45 years) completed a symptom diary over two menstrual cycles, a retrospective screening for premenstrual symptoms, and answered additional impairment questionnaires from August 2013 to August 2015. The scores revealed moderate to good reliability (Cronbachs a = 0.83-0.96). Convergent validity was shown by significant correlations with a retrospective screening, the Pain Disability Index, and the German PMS-Impact Questionnaire. Discriminant validity was indicated by low correlations with the Big Five Inventory-10. These scores may facilitate the evaluation of prospective symptom ratings in research and clinical practice. Future research should focus on continuing to validate the scores (e.g., in an ambulatory setting).

Keywords
DSM-5; menstrual cycle; premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD); premenstrual syndrome (PMS); psychological diagnostics; symptom diary
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146317 (URN)10.1080/03630242.2016.1206055 (DOI)000407790600006 ()27355449 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-07 Created: 2018-04-07 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Weise, C., Kleinstaeuber, M. & Andersson, G. (2016). Internet-Delivered Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Psychosomatic Medicine, 78(4), 501-510
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-Delivered Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial
2016 (English)In: Psychosomatic Medicine, ISSN 0033-3174, E-ISSN 1534-7796, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 501-510Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives Tinnitus has a substantially negative impact on quality of life in up to 5% of the general population. Internet-based cognitive-behavioral treatment (iCBT) has been shown to be effective in a few trials. The aim of our study was to investigate iCBT for tinnitus by using a randomized controlled trial. Methods Patients with severe tinnitus-related distress were randomly assigned to therapist-guided iCBT (n = 62) or to a moderated online discussion forum (n = 62). Standardized self-report measures for tinnitus-related distress (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire) and associated symptoms (tinnitus acceptance, anxiety, depression, and insomnia) were assessed at pretreatment and posttreatment, 6-month-, and 1-year follow-up. Clinical significance was assessed with the Reliable Change Index. Results Multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant main effects for time, group, and interaction in favor of the iCBT group. With regard to tinnitus-related distress, the significant univariate interaction effects (time by group) were supported by large effect sizes (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory: g = 0.83, 95% confidence interval = 0.47-1.20; Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire: g = 1.08, 95% confidence interval = 0.71-1.64). For the secondary outcomes, significant interactions with small to medium effect sizes were found. Within-group effects for the iCBT, from pretreatment to follow-up, were substantial in regard to tinnitus-related distress (1.38 d 1.81) and small to large for secondary outcomes (0.39 d 1.04). Conclusions Using a randomized controlled trial design, we replicated prior findings regarding positive effects of Internet-delivered CBT on tinnitus-related distress and associated symptoms. Implementing iCBT for tinnitus into regular health care will be an important next step to increase access to treatment for patients with tinnitus. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT01205919.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2016
Keywords
tinnitus; Internet-based intervention; randomized controlled trial; cognitive-behavioral therapy; tinnitus-related distress
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129502 (URN)10.1097/PSY.0000000000000310 (DOI)000376661100012 ()26867083 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Heinrich, S., Rozental, A., Carlbring, P., Andersson, G., Cotter, K. & Weise, C. (2016). Treating tinnitus distress via the Internet: A mixed methods approach of what makes patients seek help and stay motivated during Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy. Internet Interventions, 4(2), 120-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treating tinnitus distress via the Internet: A mixed methods approach of what makes patients seek help and stay motivated during Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 120-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) has proven to be an effective treatment in improving patients' ability to cope with tinnitus. However, some patients prefer face-to-face therapy to ICBT, and a few studies have shown considerable dropout rates if the treatment is not guided. This renders it important to identify factors that contribute to the commencement and continuation of ICBT programs.

Aims

Because treatment motivation and expectations are important factors in psychological treatment, the aim of our study was to investigate what leads tinnitus patients to seek out ICBT, what helps them to keep up with the treatment, and what (if any) impact these factors have on dropout rates and treatment outcomes.

Method

112 tinnitus patients taking part in ICBT for tinnitus responded to symptom-related questionnaires at three points in time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and one-year-follow-up) and to a questionnaire consisting of open-ended questions about their treatment motivation and expectations before beginning treatment. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, and the results were used to divide the participants into groups. The treatment outcomes of these groups were compared using t-tests, χ2-tests, and both one-factorial and mixed ANOVAs.

Results

Four main categories emerged as factors conducive to starting treatment: 1) Targets participants wanted to address, 2) circumstances that led to participation, 3) attitudes towards the treatment, and 4) training features. Participants identified six facilitators for continuing the treatment: success, training, individual attitude, hope, evidence, and support. Naming specific tinnitus-associated problems as targets was associated with greater improvement from pre-treatment to 1-year-follow-up. Describing an active involvement in the treatment was related to increased improvement from post-treatment to follow-up.

Conclusion

There are several motivational factors that tinnitus patients consider relevant for beginning and continuing ICBT. Particularly, focusing on specific targets that do not involve the tinnitus itself, and encouraging participants to take an active role in treatment may increase treatment effectiveness. However, further hypothesis-guided research is necessary to confirm our explorative results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Tinnitus, ICBT, Self-help, Mixed methods, Motivation, Expectations
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142243 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2016.04.001 (DOI)2-s2.0-84974623876 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Kleinstaeuber, M., Frank, I. & Weise, C. (2015). A confirmatory factor analytic validation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 78(3), 277-284
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A confirmatory factor analytic validation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory
2015 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 277-284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Because the postulated three-factor structure of the internationally widely used Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) has not been confirmed yet by a confirmatory factor analytic approach this was the central aim of the current study. Methods: From a clinical setting, N = 373 patients with chronic tinnitus completed the THI and further questionnaires assessing tinnitus-related and psychological variables. In order to analyze the psychometric properties of the THI, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and correlational analyses were conducted. Results: CFA provided a statistically significant support for a better fit of the data to the hypothesized three-factor structure (RMSEA = .049, WRMR = 1.062, CFI = .965, TLI = .961) than to a general factor model (RMSEA = .062, WRMR = 1.258, CFI = .942, TLI = .937). The calculation of Cronbachs alpha as indicator of internal consistency revealed satisfactory values (.80-.91) with the exception of the catastrophic subscale (.65). High positive correlations of the THI and its subscales with other measures of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression, high negative correlations with tinnitus acceptance, moderate positive correlations with anxiety sensitivity, sleeping difficulties, tinnitus loudness, and small correlations with the Big Five personality dimensions confirmed construct validity. Conclusion: Results show that the THI is a highly reliable and valid measure of tinnitus-related handicap. In contrast to results of previous exploratory analyses the current findings speak for a three-factor in contrast to a unifactorial structure. Future research is needed to replicate this result in different tinnitus populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Confirmatory factor analysis; Self-report measure; Tinnitus; Tinnitus distress; Tinnitus Handicap Inventory; Validation
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116516 (URN)10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.12.001 (DOI)000350186300011 ()25582803 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Janda, C., Kues, J. N., Kleinstaeuber, M. & Weise, C. (2015). A Therapeutic Approach to Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Modularized Treatment Program. Verhaltenstherapie (Basel), 25(4), 294-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Therapeutic Approach to Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Modularized Treatment Program
2015 (English)In: Verhaltenstherapie (Basel), ISSN 1016-6262, E-ISSN 1423-0402, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 294-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The paper presents a modularized treatment approach for women with premenstrual symptoms. Many women of reproductive age suffer from physical and/or mental premenstrual complaints, which can significantly reduce the quality of everyday life. Current studies showed positive effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy and lifestyle interventions. Overall, there is a lack of effective treatment approach. Method: The present approach addresses women with a severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). It consists of a detailed psychoeducation, cognitive interventions regarding PMS-related dysfunctional cognitions, strategies to change dysfunctional behaviors, and targets lifestyle issues such as stress, relaxation, balanced diet, and sports. Results: First results of the efficacy as well as the contentment with the treatment program were reported within a case study. Conclusion: The paper presents newly developed treatment guidelines, which can be integrated both, in research and therapeutic practice. The treatment guidelines should be used in further research to optimize the treatment of premenstrual burden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KARGER, 2015
Keywords
Premenstrual syndrome (PMS); Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD); Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT); Lifestyle habits
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123843 (URN)10.1159/000439336 (DOI)000366725000005 ()
Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Schmelzer, K., Ditzen, B., Weise, C., Andersson, G., Hiller, W. & Kleinstaeuber, M. (2015). Clinical Profiles of Premenstrual Experiences Among Women Having Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Affective Changes Predominate and Relate to Social and Occupational Functioning. Health Care for Women International, 36(10), 1104-1123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical Profiles of Premenstrual Experiences Among Women Having Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Affective Changes Predominate and Relate to Social and Occupational Functioning
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 36, no 10, p. 1104-1123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our objective for this study was to examine symptom severity among women suffering from premenstrual syndrome as well as associations between symptom severity and impairment. In a one-cycle prospective study, various premenstrual symptoms of 91 women were assessed. Tension and irritability were the most severe symptoms. Headache, irritability, self-deprecating thoughts, and depressed mood were the symptoms that were subjectively rated as the most burdensome. Significant correlations were found between the mean premenstrual severity and functional impairment. The severity of premenstrual affective symptoms was related to social impairment. The severity of psychological symptoms was correlated with occupational impairment. These findings confirm the prominent role of premenstrual affective symptoms and support classification guidelines focusing on both affective and physical changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR and FRANCIS INC, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122199 (URN)10.1080/07399332.2014.954701 (DOI)000361983000004 ()25186770 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Conrad, I., Kleinstaeuber, M., Jasper, K., Hiller, W., Andersson, G. & Weise, C. (2015). The Changeability and Predictive Value of Dysfunctional Cognitions in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Tinnitus. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 22(2), 239-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Changeability and Predictive Value of Dysfunctional Cognitions in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Tinnitus
Show others...
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 239-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Multidimensional tinnitus models describe dysfunctional cognitions as a complicating factor in the process of tinnitus habituation. However, this concept has rarely been investigated in previous research. Purpose The present study investigated the effects of two cognitive-behavioral treatments on dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions in patients with chronic tinnitus. Furthermore, dysfunctional cognitions were examined as possible predictors of the therapeutic effect on tinnitus distress. Method A total of 128 patients with chronic tinnitus were randomly assigned to either an Internet-delivered guided self-help treatment (Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy, ICBT), a conventional face-to-face group therapy (cognitive-behavioral group therapy, GCBT), or an active control group in the form of a web-based discussion forum (DF). To assess tinnitus-related dysfunctional thoughts, the Tinnitus Cognitions Scale (T-Cog) was used at pre- and post-assessment, as well as at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Results Multivariate ANOVAs with post hoc tests revealed significant and comparable reductions of dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions for both treatments (GCBT and ICBT), which remained stable over a 6- and 12-month period. Negative correlations were found between the catastrophic subscale of the T-Cog and therapy outcome for ICBT, but not for GCBT. This means a higher degree of catastrophic thinking at baseline was associated with lower benefit from ICBT directly after the treatment. Hierarchical regression analysis confirmed catastrophizing as a predictor of poorer therapy outcome regarding emotional tinnitus distress in ICBT. No associations were detected in the follow-up assessments. Conclusion Both forms of CBT are successful in reducing dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions. Catastrophizing significantly predicted a less favorable outcome regarding emotional tinnitus distress in ICBT. Clinical implications of these results are described. Dysfunctional cognitions could be targeted more intensively in therapy and in future research on tinnitus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2015
Keywords
Chronic tinnitus; Dysfunctional cognitions; Cognitive-behavioral therapy; Internet-based therapy; Cognitive-behavioral group therapy; Self-help treatment
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117213 (URN)10.1007/s12529-014-9425-3 (DOI)000351523600010 ()25031187 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (HEAD Linnaeus Grant)

Available from: 2015-04-23 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Conrad, I., Kleinstaeuber, M., Jasper, K., Hiller, W., Andersson, G. & Weise, C. (2015). The Role of Dysfunctional Cognitions in Patients With Chronic Tinnitus. Ear and Hearing, 36(5), E279-E289
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Dysfunctional Cognitions in Patients With Chronic Tinnitus
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 5, p. E279-E289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The present study investigates the role of dysfunctional cognitions in patients with chronic tinnitus. To explore different dimensions of tinnitus-related thoughts, a 22-item self-report measure, the Tinnitus Cognitions Scale (T-Cog), is presented. Furthermore, dysfunctional cognitions are examined as a possible mediator of the relation between tinnitus distress and depression. Design: The present study analyzes the cross-sectional data of 373 patients with chronic tinnitus. Parallel analysis and principal axis factoring are used to identify the factor structure of the T-Cog. Assumed mediating effects are tested using the asymptotic and resampling procedure. Results: Factor analysis reveals two factors interpreted as tinnitus-related catastrophic thinking and tinnitus-related avoidance cognitions. Internal consistency is sufficient with a Cronbachs of 0.88 for the total scale and 0.74 and 0.87 for the subscales. The authors find high associations between the T-Cog and other measures of tinnitus distress, depression, anxiety, and tinnitus acceptance, indicating convergent validity. With the exception of neuroticism, low correlations with personality factors are found, indicating discriminant validity. Patients with moderate or severe tinnitus distress report significantly higher scores of dysfunctional cognitions than patients with mild tinnitus distress. Tinnitus-related catastrophic thinking and tinnitus-related avoidance cognitions partially mediate the relation between tinnitus distress and depression. Conclusions: Dysfunctional cognitions can play an important role in the degree of tinnitus distress. Catastrophic and avoidant thoughts contribute to the explanation of depression among tinnitus patients. The T-Cog is a reliable and valid questionnaire for the assessment of different dimensions of cognitions. Its use could provide information for identifying tinnitus patients who are particularly suitable for cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 2015
Keywords
Chronic tinnitus; Dysfunctional cognitions; Mediation analysis; Self-report measure; Tinnitus distress
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121753 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000168 (DOI)000360630800008 ()25906171 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (HEAD Linnaeus Grant)

Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Rheker, J., Andersson, G. & Weise, C. (2015). The role of “on demand” therapist guidance vs. no support in the treatment of tinnitus via the internet: A randomized controlled trial. Internet Interventions, 2(2), 189-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of “on demand” therapist guidance vs. no support in the treatment of tinnitus via the internet: A randomized controlled trial
2015 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

Internet-based cognitive behavioral self-help treatments (iCBT) have been shown to successfully reduce the distress associated with tinnitus. Despite this success, little is known about the mechanisms that make iCBT for tinnitus sufferers work. Availability of minimal therapeutic support is assumed to positively influence treatment outcome in iCBT, but the lower limit of required support is not known. In face-to-face therapy, patients' positive outcome expectations have demonstrated an advantageous effect on outcome. The first aim of our study was thus to investigate the role of ‘on demand’ therapeutic guidance vs. no therapeutic support on treatment outcome in an iCBT for tinnitus sufferers. Our second aim was to investigate whether positive outcome expectations can predict treatment outcome.

Methods

A total of 112 tinnitus patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups (support-on-demand or non-support). Both groups received an established iCBT treatment for tinnitus. While participants in the support group (n = 56) could ask a therapist for additional support, those in the other (n = 56) received no therapeutic guidance. Tinnitus distress was assessed pre- and post-treatment via the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and the Mini-Tinnitus Questionnaire (Mini-TQ). Pre-treatment outcome expectations were assessed using the Patient Questionnaire on Therapy Expectation and Evaluation (PATHEV).

Results

We observed significantly less tinnitus distress in the THI (support: t(55) = 7.51, p ≤ .001; non-support: t(55) = 7.68, p ≤ .001) and Mini-TQ (support: t(55) = 8.24, p ≤ .001; non-support: t(55) = 8.46, p ≤ .001) in both groups from pre- to post-treatment, but no significant differences between the groups or interactions. The PATHEV subscale “Hope of Improvement” significantly predicted treatment outcome as measured by the THI (β = 0.28, p = .027).

Conclusions

The iCBT self-help program is a good treatment option for tinnitus sufferers whether or not support-on-demand is provided. Furthermore, our results show the importance of outcome expectations to the efficacy of iCBT in tinnitus patients. Future research should focus on discovering further predictors of treatment outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Internet-based self-help, Tinnitus, Therapeutic guidance, Expectation, Predictor
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142232 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2015.03.007 (DOI)2-s2.0-84928328670 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5216-1031

Search in DiVA

Show all publications