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Moradi, Shahram
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Moradi, S., Lidestam, B. & Rönnberg, J. (2016). Comparison of Gated Audiovisual Speech Identification in Elderly Hearing Aid Users and Elderly Normal-Hearing Individuals: Effects of Adding Visual Cues to Auditory Speech Stimuli. TRENDS IN HEARING, 20, Article ID 2331216516653355.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Gated Audiovisual Speech Identification in Elderly Hearing Aid Users and Elderly Normal-Hearing Individuals: Effects of Adding Visual Cues to Auditory Speech Stimuli
2016 (English)In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 20, article id 2331216516653355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study compared elderly hearing aid (EHA) users (n = 20) with elderly normal-hearing (ENH) listeners (n = 20) in terms of isolation points (IPs, the shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus) and accuracy of audiovisual gated speech stimuli (consonants, words, and final words in highly and less predictable sentences) presented in silence. In addition, we compared the IPs of audiovisual speech stimuli from the present study with auditory ones extracted from a previous study, to determine the impact of the addition of visual cues. Both participant groups achieved ceiling levels in terms of accuracy in the audiovisual identification of gated speech stimuli; however, the EHA group needed longer IPs for the audiovisual identification of consonants and words. The benefit of adding visual cues to auditory speech stimuli was more evident in the EHA group, as audiovisual presentation significantly shortened the IPs for consonants, words, and final words in less predictable sentences; in the ENH group, audiovisual presentation only shortened the IPs for consonants and words. In conclusion, although the audiovisual benefit was greater for EHA group, this group had inferior performance compared with the ENH group in terms of IPs when supportive semantic context was lacking. Consequently, EHA users needed the initial part of the audiovisual speech signal to be longer than did their counterparts with normal hearing to reach the same level of accuracy in the absence of a semantic context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2016
Keywords
audiovisual speech perception; EHA users; ENH listeners; gating paradigm
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130430 (URN)10.1177/2331216516653355 (DOI)000379790000003 ()27317667 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [349-2007-8654]

Available from: 2016-08-07 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Moradi, S., Lidestam, B. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Comparison of gated audiovisual speech perception between elderly hearing-aid users and elderly normal-hearing listeners. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of gated audiovisual speech perception between elderly hearing-aid users and elderly normal-hearing listeners
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The addition of visual cues to amplified auditory signals by hearing aids resulted in better identification of speech stimuli relative to unaided audiovisual or aided auditory-only conditions (Walden et al., 2001). An important question that remains unexplored is whether hearing-aid users have the same level of ability for audiovisual speech perception relative to their age-matched normal hearing counterparts.

Here we present the preliminary findings from collected data of 18 elderly hearing-aid users and 18 normal-hearing listeners in gated-audiovisual identification of different types of speech stimuli (consonants, words, and final words in low-predictable and high-predictable sentences). In terms of isolation point (IP; the shortest time from the onset of an speech stimulus required for correct identification of that speech stimulus), results showed that elderly hearing-aid users needed more IPs for identification of consonants and words than elderly normal-hearing individuals under quiet condition. There were no differences between two groups in IPs needed for identification of final words embedded in low-predictable or high-predictable sentences. In terms of accuracy, both elderly hearing-aid and elderly normal-hearing groups achieved ceiling on audiovisual identification of speech stimuli under quiet condition.

National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123283 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17
Moradi, S., Lidestam, B. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Greater explicit cognitive resources support speech-in-noise identification in elderly normal-hearing listeners. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Greater explicit cognitive resources support speech-in-noise identification in elderly normal-hearing listeners
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Prior studies have demonstrated that cognitive capacity of listeners is a key factor in speech-in-noise tests in young-normal-hearing listeners (e.g., Moradi et al., 2014) and hearing-impaired individuals (e.g., Foo et al., 2007; Rudner et al., 2012). In addition, aging is associated with decline in sensory and cognitive functions that may impair speech perception in noisy conditions.

The present study aimed to investigate the relationships between working memory and attentional capacities and speech-in-noise identification in elderly normal-hearing listeners. Twenty-four native Swedish speakers (13 women and 11 men) normal hearing were recruited to participate in the study. The mean age of participants was 71.5 years (SD = 3.1 years, range: 66–77 years). The reading span test (RST) and the Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test (PASAT) were used to measure working memory capacity and attentional capacity, respectively. The speech-in-noise identification measured using the HINT (at 50% correct level) and Hagerman test (at 80% correct level). Results showed that individuals with greater working memory and attentional capacities had better performance in HINT and Hagerman tests. These findings support the notion that explicit cognitive resources of listeners play a critical role in identification of speech stimuli under degraded listening conditions.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123282 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17
Golzari, F., Hemati Alamdarloo, G. & Moradi, S. (2015). The Effect of a Social Stories Intervention on the Social Skills of Male Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder. SAGE Open, 5(4), 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of a Social Stories Intervention on the Social Skills of Male Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder
2015 (English)In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) [Artistic work] Published
Abstract [en]

The present study aimed to investigate the effect of a social stories intervention on the social skills of male students with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). The sample included 30 male students with ASD who were selected through convenience sampling and randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 15) or a control group (n = 15). The social skills of both groups were assessed pre- and post-test using Stone and colleagues’ Social Skills Scale (which included subscales for understanding/perspective-taking, initiating interactions, responding to interactions, and maintaining interactions). The experimental group participated in 16 sessions of social stories training, while the control group did not. Overall, the results showed that the social stories intervention improved the social skills of the children with ASD in the experimental group compared with the control group. The effects of the social stories intervention were mostly evident in the subscales for understanding/perspective-taking, initiating interactions, and maintaining interactions with others. The social stories intervention had no effect on the subscale assessing ability to respond to others. The study findings emphasize the effectiveness of the social stories intervention in improving the social skills of children with ASD, which may be used by teachers, parents, or professionals who work with such children.

Keywords
social stories intervention, social skills, autism spectrum disorder
National Category
Applied Psychology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123664 (URN)10.1177/2158244015621599 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-01-06 Created: 2016-01-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Lidestam, B., Moradi, S., Pettersson, R. & Ricklefs, T. (2014). Audiovisual training is better than auditory-only training for auditory-only speech-in-noise identification. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 136(2), EL142-EL147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Audiovisual training is better than auditory-only training for auditory-only speech-in-noise identification
2014 (English)In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 136, no 2, p. EL142-EL147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effects of audiovisual versus auditory training for speech-in-noise identification were examined in 60 young participants. The training conditions were audiovisual training, auditory-only training, and no training (n = 20 each). In the training groups, gated consonants and words were presented at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio; stimuli were either audiovisual or auditory-only. The no-training group watched a movie clip without performing a speech identification task. Speech-in-noise identification was measured before and after the training (or control activity). Results showed that only audiovisual training improved speech-in-noise identification, demonstrating superiority over auditory-only training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2014
Keywords
Audiovisual training, audio training, speech-in-noise identification
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108989 (URN)10.1121/1.4890200 (DOI)000341178100014 ()25096138 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 006-6917
Available from: 2014-07-19 Created: 2014-07-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lidestam, B., Holgersson, J. & Moradi, S. (2014). Comparison of informational vs. energetic masking effects on speechreading performance. Frontiers in Psychology, 5(639)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of informational vs. energetic masking effects on speechreading performance
2014 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, no 639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effects of two types of auditory distracters (steady-state noise vs. four-talker babble) on visual-only speechreading accuracy were tested against a baseline (silence) in 23 participants with above-average speechreading ability. Their task was to speechread high frequency Swedish words. They were asked to rate their own performance and effort, and report how distracting each type of auditory distracter was. Only four-talker babble impeded speechreading accuracy. This suggests competition for phonological processing, since the four-talker babble demands phonological processing, which is also required for the speechreading task. Better accuracy was associated with lower self-rated effort in silence; no other correlations were found.

Keywords
speechperception, cognition, speechreading, informational masking, energetic masking
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108990 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00639 (DOI)000338723500001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2006–6917
Available from: 2014-07-19 Created: 2014-07-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Moradi, S., Lidestam, B., Saremi, A. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Gated auditory speech perception: effects of listening conditions and cognitive capacity. Frontiers in Psychology, 5(531)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gated auditory speech perception: effects of listening conditions and cognitive capacity
2014 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, no 531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to measure the initial portion of signal required for the correct identification of auditory speech stimuli (or isolation points, IPs) in silence and noise, and to investigate the relationships between auditory and cognitive functions in silence and noise. Twenty-one university students were presented with auditory stimuli in a gating paradigm for the identification of consonants, words, and final words in highly predictable and low predictable sentences. The Hearing in Noise Test (HINT), the reading span test, and the Paced Auditory Serial Attention Test were also administered to measure speech-in-noise ability, working memory and attentional capacities of the participants, respectively. The results showed that noise delayed the identification of consonants, words, and final words in highly predictable and low predictable sentences. HINT performance correlated with working memory and attentional capacities. In the noise condition, there were correlations between HINT performance, cognitive task performance, and the IPs of consonants and words. In the silent condition, there were no correlations between auditory and cognitive tasks. In conclusion, a combination of hearing-in-noise ability, working memory capacity, and attention capacity is needed for the early identification of consonants and words in noise.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Research Foundation, 2014
Keywords
Gating Paradigm, Auditory Perception, Consonant, Word, Final Word in Sentence, Silence, Noise
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-107008 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00531 (DOI)000337545700001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2007-8654
Available from: 2014-06-02 Created: 2014-06-02 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Moradi, S., Lidestam, B., Hällgren, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Gated auditory speech perception in elderly hearing aid users and elderly normal-hearing individuals: effects of hearing impairment and cognitive capacity. Trends in Hearing, 18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gated auditory speech perception in elderly hearing aid users and elderly normal-hearing individuals: effects of hearing impairment and cognitive capacity
2014 (English)In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study compared elderly hearing aid (EHA) users and elderly normal-hearing (ENH) individuals on identification of auditory speech stimuli (consonants, words, and final word in sentences) that were different when considering their linguistic properties. We measured the accuracy with which the target speech stimuli were identified, as well as the isolation points (IPs: the shortest duration, from onset, required to correctly identify the speech target). The relationships between working memory capacity, the IPs, and speech accuracy were also measured. Twenty-four EHA users (with mild to moderate hearing impairment) and 24 ENH individuals participated in the present study. Despite the use of their regular hearing aids, the EHA users had delayed IPs and were less accurate in identifying consonants and words compared with the ENH individuals. The EHA users also had delayed IPs for final word identification in sentences with lower predictability; however, no significant between-group difference in accuracy was observed. Finally, there were no significant between-group differences in terms of IPs or accuracy for final word identification in highly predictable sentences. Our results also showed that, among EHA users, greater working memory capacity was associated with earlier IPs and improved accuracy in consonant and word identification. Together, our findings demonstrate that the gated speech perception ability of EHA users was not at the level of ENH individuals, in terms of IPs and accuracy. In addition, gated speech perception was more cognitively demanding for EHA users than for ENH individuals in the absence of semantic context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
hearing aid users, gating paradigm, speech perception, cognition
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109067 (URN)10.1177/2331216514545406 (DOI)000343753700007 ()25085610 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2007-8654
Available from: 2014-08-04 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2015-08-12Bibliographically approved
Moradi, S. (2014). Time is of the essence in speech perception!: Get it fast, or think about it. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time is of the essence in speech perception!: Get it fast, or think about it
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Lyssna nu! : Hör rätt direkt, eller klura på det!
Abstract [en]

The present thesis examined the extent to which background noise influences the isolation point (IP, the shortest time from the onset of speech stimulus required for correct identification of that speech stimulus) and accuracy in identification of different types of speech stimuli (consonants, words, and final words in high-predictable [HP] and low-predictable [LP] sentences). These speech stimuli were presented in different modalities of presentation (auditory, visual, and audiovisual) to young normal-hearing listeners (Papers 1, 2, and 5). In addition, the present thesis studied under what conditions cognitive resources were explicitly demanded in identification of different types of speech stimuli (Papers 1 and 2). Further, elderly hearing-aid (EHA) users and elderly normal-hearing (ENH) listeners were compared with regard to the IPs, accuracy, and under what conditions explicit cognitive resources were demanded in identification of auditory speech stimuli in silence (Paper 3). The results showed that background noise resulted in later IPs and reduced the accuracy for the identification of different types of speech stimuli in both modalities of speech presentation. Explicit cognitive resources were demanded in identification of speech stimuli in the auditory-only modality, under the noisy condition, and in the absence of a prior semantic context. In addition, audiovisual presentation of speech stimuli resulted in earlier IPs and more accurate identification of speech stimuli than auditory presentation. Furthermore, a pre-exposure to audiovisual speech stimuli resulted in better auditory speech-in-noise identification than an exposure to auditory-only speech stimuli (Papers 2 and 4). When comparing EHA users and ENH individuals, the EHA users showed inferior performance in the identification of consonants, words, and final words in LP sentences (in terms of IP). In terms of accuracy, the EHA users demonstrated inferior performance only in the identification of consonants and words. Only the identification of consonants and words demanded explicit cognitive resources in the EHA users. Theoretical predictions and clinical implications were discussed.

Abstract [sv]

I denna avhandling undersöktes hur mycket bakgrundsbuller inverkar på isolationspunkten (IP, den tidigaste tidpunkt när ett talat stimulus kan identifieras korrekt) och exakthet i identifikation av olika typer av talade stimuli (konsonanter, ord, och ord i final position i högt predicerbara [HP] respektive lågt predicerbara [LP] meningar). Dessa talade stimuli presenterades i olika modaliteteter (auditivt, visuellt, och audiovisuellt) för unga normalhörande deltagare (Artikel 1, 2 och 5). Dessutom jämfördes under vilka betingelser explicita kognitiva resurser krävdes för identifikation av olika typer av talade stimuli (Artikel 1 och 2). Vidare jämfördes äldre hörapparatsanvändare (EHA) och äldre normalhörande (ENH) personer med avseende på IP, exakthet i identifikation, och under vilka betingelser explicita kognitiva resurser krävdes för auditiv identifikation i tystnad (d.v.s. utan bakgrundsbuller) (Artikel 3). Resultaten visade att bakgrundsbuller gav senare IP och sänkte exaktheten för identifikation av olika typer av talade stimuli och i båda modaliteterna för presentation. Explicita kognitiva resurser krävdes vid identifikation av talade stimuli vid rent auditiv presentation med bakgrundsbuller, och när ingen semantisk förhandsinformation presenterades. Dessutom resulterade audiovisuell presentation i tidigare IP och mer exakt identifikation av talade stimuli, jämfört med rent auditiv presentation. Ett ytterligare resultat var att förexponering av audiovisuella talade stimuli resulterade i bättre identifikation av tal i bakgrundsbrus, jämfört med förexponering av enbart auditiva talade stimuli (Artikel 2 och 4). Vid jämförelse av EHA-användare och ENH-personer, hade EHA-användare senare IP i identifikation av konsonanter, ord, och ord i final position i LP-meningar. Dessutom hade EHA-användare mindre exakt identifikation av konsonanter och ord. Endast identifikation av konsonanter och ord krävde explicita kognitiva resurser hos EHA-användare. Teoretiska prediktioner och kliniska implikationer diskuterades.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014. p. 56
Series
Linköping Studies in Arts and Science, ISSN 0282-9800 ; 635Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 68
Keywords
Noise, auditory speech perception, audiovisual speech perception, hearing aids, Buller, hörsel, auditiv talperception, audiovisuell talperception, hörhjälpmedel
National Category
Other Medical Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111723 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-111723 (DOI)978-91-7519-188-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-11-28, I:101, Hus I, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 14:00 (Swedish)
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-10-29 Created: 2014-10-29 Last updated: 2014-10-31Bibliographically approved
Habibi, M., Khawaja, N. G., Moradi, S., Dehghani, M. & Fadaei, Z. (2014). University Student Depression Inventory: Measurement model and psychometric properties. Australian journal of psychology, 66(3), 149-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>University Student Depression Inventory: Measurement model and psychometric properties
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Australian journal of psychology, ISSN 0004-9530, E-ISSN 1742-9536, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 149-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

University Student Depression Inventory (USDI) was developed to assess the symptoms of depression among the university students. Considering the debilitating nature of depression among university students globally, USDI was translated in Persian and validated using university students from Iran. A battery including the Persian version of USDI and scales measuring suicide, depression, and stress was administered to a normative sample of 359 undergraduate students, and an additional clinical sample of 150 students referred to the universitys mental health centre. The results supported the factor structure and the psychometric properties of the translated version. Confirmatory factor analysis upheld the previously reported three-factor first-order and one-factor second-order structure. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent and discriminant validity of the Persian version were supported. Cut-off points using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were established to identify students at risk. Gender differences on the symptoms of depression were evident only in the normative sample, where male participants, compared with female students, had higher mean scores in lethargy, cognitive/emotion, and academic motivation subscales. The translated scale can be used with Persian-speaking students in Iran and the neighbouring countries as well as those settled in the West to identify symptoms of depression for further evaluation and management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Australian Psychological Society, 2014
Keywords
measurement model; Persian version; University Student Depression Inventory
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109576 (URN)10.1111/ajpy.12037 (DOI)000339567700001 ()
Available from: 2014-08-21 Created: 2014-08-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11
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