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Rodriguez-Martinez, HeribertoORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5194-2124
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Publications (10 of 162) Show all publications
Li, J., Parrilla, I., Ortega, M. D., Martinez, E. A., Rodriguez-Martinez, H. & Roca, J. (2018). Post-thaw boar sperm motility is affected by prolonged storage of sperm in liquid nitrogen. A retrospective study. Cryobiology, 80, 119-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-thaw boar sperm motility is affected by prolonged storage of sperm in liquid nitrogen. A retrospective study
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2018 (English)In: Cryobiology, ISSN 0011-2240, E-ISSN 1090-2392, Vol. 80, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Owing to the quick genetic turnover of the pig industry, most AT-boar sires live 2-3 yr, a period during which for 1-2 yr their semen is extended and used in liquid form for AI. Despite showing low cryosurvival, affecting fertility after AI, boar semen is frozen for easiness of transport overseas and reposition of valuable genetics. For the latter, semen is stored in liquid nitrogen (LN2, cryostorage) for many years, a controversial practice. Here we studied how length of cryostorage could affect sperm quality. Straws (0.5 mL) frozen using the same cryopreservation protocol at one specific location from AI-sires of proven fertility were stored in LN2 for up to 8 yr. Post thaw sperm quality was evaluated after 2, 4 or 8 yr of cryostorage, always compared to early thawing (15 d after freezing). Sperm motility and kinematics were evaluated post-thaw using CASA and sperm viability was cytometrically evaluated using specific fluorophores. Sperm viability was not affected by length of cryostorage, but total and progressive sperm motility were lower (p amp;lt; 0.01) in sperm samples cryostored for 4 or 8 yr compared to those thawed 15 d after freezing. Cryostorage time affected sperm kinetics, but with greater intensity in the samples cryostored for 4 yr (p amp;lt; 0.001) than in those for 2 yr (p amp;lt; 0.01). The fact that the major phenotypic characteristic of boar spermatozoa, motility, is constrained by time of cryostorage should be considered when building cryobanks of pig semen. Attention should be placed on the finding that amp;gt; 2 yr of cryostorage time can be particularly detrimental for the post-thaw motility of some sires, which might require increasing sperm numbers for AI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Porcine; Sperm; Cryopreservation; Liquid nitrogen storage
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145795 (URN)10.1016/j.cryobiol.2017.11.004 (DOI)000425485100018 ()29146065 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Seneca Foundation Murcia, Spain [19892/GERM-15]; China Scholarship Council [2013/3009]

Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-04-17
Atikuzzaman, M., Alvarez-Rodriguez, M., Carrillo, A. V., Johnsson, M., Wright, D. & Rodriguez-Martinez, H. (2017). Conserved gene expression in sperm reservoirs between birds and mammals in response to mating.. BMC Genomics, 18(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conserved gene expression in sperm reservoirs between birds and mammals in response to mating.
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2017 (English)In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 18, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Spermatozoa are stored in the oviductal functional sperm reservoir in animals with internal fertilization, including zoologically distant classes such as pigs or poultry. They are held fertile in the reservoir for times ranging from a couple of days (in pigs), to several weeks (in chickens), before they are gradually released to fertilize the newly ovulated eggs. It is currently unknown whether females from these species share conserved mechanisms to tolerate such a lengthy presence of immunologically-foreign spermatozoa. Therefore, global gene expression was assessed using cDNA microarrays on tissue collected from the avian utero-vaginal junction (UVJ), and the porcine utero-tubal junction (UTJ) to determine expression changes after mating (entire semen deposition) or in vivo cloacal/cervical infusion of sperm-free seminal fluid (SF)/seminal plasma (SP).

RESULTS: In chickens, mating changed the expression of 303 genes and SF-infusion changed the expression of 931 genes, as compared to controls, with 68 genes being common to both treatments. In pigs, mating or SP-infusion changed the expressions of 1,722 and 1,148 genes, respectively, as compared to controls, while 592 genes were common to both treatments. The differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for GO categories related to immune system functions (35.72-fold enrichment). The top 200 differentially expressed genes of each treatment in each animal class were analysed for gene ontology. In both pig and chicken, an excess of genes affecting local immune defence were activated, though frequently these were down-regulated. Similar genes were found in both the chicken and pig, either involved in pH-regulation (SLC16A2, SLC4A9, SLC13A1, SLC35F1, ATP8B3, ATP13A3) or immune-modulation (IFIT5, IFI16, MMP27, ADAMTS3, MMP3, MMP12).

CONCLUSION: Despite being phylogenetically distant, chicken and pig appear to share some gene functions for the preservation of viable spermatozoa in the female reservoirs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134399 (URN)10.1186/s12864-017-3488-x (DOI)000394380200005 ()28100167 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Research Council FORMAS, Stockholm [221-2011-512]

Available from: 2017-02-23 Created: 2017-02-23 Last updated: 2018-05-07
Liffner, S., Hammar, M., Bladh, M., Nedstrand, E., Rodriguez-Martinez, H. & Sydsjö, G. (2017). Men becoming fathers by intracytoplasmic sperm injection were more often born small for gestational to age. Asian Journal of Andrology, 19(1), 103-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Men becoming fathers by intracytoplasmic sperm injection were more often born small for gestational to age
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2017 (English)In: Asian Journal of Andrology, ISSN 1008-682X, E-ISSN 1745-7262, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 103-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Being born with nonoptimal birth characteristics decreases the chance of becoming a father. Urogenital malformations as well as metabolic syndrome are more common in men born small for gestational age (SGA) and could be contributing factors to the reduced fertility rate seen in these men. It could imply that men becoming fathers by assisted reproductive technology (ART) more often are born with low birth weight (LBW), preterm, and/or SGA than men conceiving without treatment and also that men where intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had to be performed more often are born with nonoptimal birth characteristics than men where conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) successfully could be used. In this retrospective, case-control study using Swedish national registers, we compared the birth characteristics of 1206 men who have become fathers by ART with a control group consisting of age-matched men who became fathers without treatment. The differences in birth characteristics between men becoming fathers by IVF and ICSI were also assessed. For men becoming fathers by ART, OR of being born with LBW was 1.66 (95% CI = 1.17-2.36) compared with fathers who conceived without treatment. OR of being born prematurely was 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00-1.77). Men becoming fathers via ICSI had a doubled increased likelihood of being born SGA compared with men who became fathers via IVF (OR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.17-3.83). In conclusion, we have found that men becoming fathers by ICSI treatments had more often been born SGA than men becoming fathers by conventional IVF.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MEDKNOW PUBLICATIONS & MEDIA PVT LTD, 2017
Keywords
infertility; intracytoplasmic sperm injection; in vitro fertilization; low birth weight; preterm; small for gestational age
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134486 (URN)10.4103/1008-682X.178848 (DOI)000392108300018 ()27184547 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland

Available from: 2017-02-15 Created: 2017-02-15 Last updated: 2018-05-02
Atikuzzaman, M., Sanz, L., Pla, D., Alvarez-Rodriguez, M., Rubér, M., Wright, D., . . . Rodriguez-Martinez, H. (2017). Selection for higher fertility reflects in the seminal fluid proteome of modern domestic chicken. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part D: Genomics and Proteomics, 21, 27-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selection for higher fertility reflects in the seminal fluid proteome of modern domestic chicken
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2017 (English)In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part D: Genomics and Proteomics, ISSN 1744-117X, E-ISSN 1878-0407, Vol. 21, p. 27-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The high egg-laying capacity of the modern domestic chicken (i.e. White Leghorn, WL) has arisen from the low egg-laying ancestor Red Junglefowl (RJF) via continuous trait selection and breeding. To investigate whether this long-term selection impacted the seminal fluid (SF)-proteome, 2DE electrophoresis-based proteomic analyses and immunoassays were conducted to map SF-proteins/cytokines in RJF, WL and a 9th generation Advanced Intercross Line (AIL) of RJF/WL-L13, including individual SF (n = 4, from each RJF, WL and AIL groups) and pools of the SF from 15 males of each group, analyzed by 2DE to determine their degree of intra-group (AIL, WL, and RJF) variability using Principal Component Analysis (PCA); respectively an inter-breed comparative analysis of intergroup fold change of specific SF protein spots intensity between breeds. The PCA clearly highlighted a clear intra-group similarity among individual roosters as well as a clear inter-group variability (e.g. between RJF, WL and AIL) validating the use of pools to minimize confounding individual variation. Protein expression varied considerably for processes related to sperm motility, nutrition, transport and survival in the female, including signaling towards immunomodulation. The major conserved SF-proteins were serum albumin and ovotransferrin. Aspartate aminotransferase, annexin A5, arginosuccinate synthase, glutathione S-transferase 2 and l-lactate dehydrogenase-A were RJF-specific. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase appeared specific to the WL-SF while angiotensin-converting enzyme, γ-enolase, coagulation factor IX, fibrinogen α-chain, hemoglobin subunit α-D, lysozyme C, phosphoglycerate kinase, Src-substrate protein p85, tubulins and thioredoxin were AIL-specific. The RJF-SF contained fewer immune system process proteins and lower amounts of the anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory TGF-β2 compared to WL and AIL, which had low levels- or lacked pro-inflammatory CXCL10 compared to RJF. The seminal fluid proteome differs between ancestor and modern chicken, with a clear enrichment of proteins and peptides related to immune-modulation for sperm survival in the female and fertility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Rooster seminal fluid proteome, Cytokines, Egg-laying capacity, Red Junglefowl, White Leghorn, Advanced intercross line, Chicken
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Genetics and Breeding
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132624 (URN)10.1016/j.cbd.2016.10.006 (DOI)000395224100004 ()27852008 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Research Council FORMAS, Stockholm, Sweden [221-2011-512]; Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Madrid, Spain) [BFU2013-42833-P]

Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
Martinez, C. A., Nohalez, A., Parrilla, I., Vazquez, J. L., Roca, J., Cuello, C., . . . Gil, M. A. (2017). Surgical embryo collection but not nonsurgical embryo transfer compromises postintervention prolificacy in sows. Theriogenology, 87, 316-320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surgical embryo collection but not nonsurgical embryo transfer compromises postintervention prolificacy in sows
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2017 (English)In: Theriogenology, ISSN 0093-691X, E-ISSN 1879-3231, Vol. 87, p. 316-320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent advances in nonsurgical deep uterine (NsDU) embryo transfer (ET) technology allow the noninvasive transfer of porcine embryos into recipients, overcoming the most important impediment for commercial ET in this species. Although many factors in the porcine ET-field have been recently evaluated, many others remain to be explored. We investigated here the future reproductive performance of donors and recipients after artificial insemination subsequent to the default surgical embryo recovery approach and to the NsDU-ET procedure, respectively. Although surgical embryo collection did not influence subsequent farrowing rates (90.5%), litter size decreased severely (8.9 +/- 0.8 piglets) compared to presurgery (10.8 +/- 0.3 piglets) and control group (10.7 +/- 0.3 piglets). In contrast, NsDU-ETs did neither affect fertility nor prolificacy of recipients in the cycle subsequent to ET, regardless of whether they were pregnant after NsDU-ET or not. These results indicate that while the surgical embryo collection procedure compromises the reproductive future of donor sows, the NsDU-ET approach does not affect the reproductive potential of the recipients after reintroduction to the breeding stock of the farm. Further research is thus needed to improve surgical embryo collection. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2017
Keywords
Pigs; Embryos; Nonsurgical embryo transfer; Surgical embryo collection; Future reproductive performance
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133249 (URN)10.1016/j.theriogenology.2016.09.009 (DOI)000388544100040 ()27707545 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnologico e Industrial (CDTI/Agropor SA), Madrid, Spain [IDI-20140140]; MINECO-FEDER, Madrid, Spain [AGL2012-38621, AGL201569735-R]; Fundacion Seneca, Murcia, Spain [19892/GERM/15]; MINECO [BES-2013-064087, BES-2013-064069]

Available from: 2016-12-18 Created: 2016-12-15 Last updated: 2018-05-02
Perez-Patino, C., Barranco, I., Parrilla, I., Luz Valero, M., Martinez, E. A., Rodriguez-Martinez, H. & Roca, J. (2016). Characterization of the porcine seminal plasma proteome comparing ejaculate portions. Journal of Proteomics, 142, 15-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of the porcine seminal plasma proteome comparing ejaculate portions
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Proteomics, ISSN 1874-3919, E-ISSN 1876-7737, Vol. 142, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Full identification of boar seminal plasma (SP) proteins remains challenging. This study aims to provide an extensive proteomic analysis of boar SP and to generate an accessible database of boar SP-proteome. A SP-pool (33 entire ejaculates/11 boars; 3 ejaculates/boar) was analyzed to characterize the boar SP-proteome. Twenty ejaculates (5 boars, 4 ejaculates/boar) collected in portions (P1: first 10 mL of sperm rich ejaculate fraction (SRF), P2: rest of SRF and P3: post-SRF) were analyzed to evaluate differentially expressed SP-proteins among portions. SP-samples were analyzed using a combination of SEC, 1-D SDS PAGE and NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS followed by functional bioinformatics. The identified proteins were quantified from normalized LFQ intensity data. A total of 536 SP-proteins were identified, 409 of them in Sus scrofa taxonomy (374 validated with amp;gt;-99% confidence). Barely 20 of the identified SP-proteins were specifically implicated in reproductive processes, albeit other SP proteins could be indirectly involved in functionality and fertility of boar spermatozoa. Thirty-four proteins (16 identified in S. scrofa taxonomy) were differentially expressed among ejaculate portions, 16 being over expressed and 18 under-expressed in Pl-P2 regarding to P3. This major proteome mapping of the boar SP provides a complex inventory of proteins with potential roles as sperm function- and fertility- biomarkers. Biological significance: This proteomic study provides the major characterization of the boar SP-proteome with amp;gt;250 proteins first reported. The boar SP-proteome is described so that a spectral library can be built for relative label free protein quantification with SWATH approach. This proteomic profiling allows the creation of a publicly accessible database of the boar SP-proteome, as a first step for further understanding the role of SP-proteins in reproductive outcomes as well as for the identification of biomarkers for sperm quality and fertility. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2016
Keywords
Porcine; Ejaculate; Seminal plasma; Proteome
National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130282 (URN)10.1016/j.jprot.2016.04.026 (DOI)000378468900002 ()27109353 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|MINECO Madrid (Spain); FEDER funds (EU) Madrid (Spain) [AGL2012-39903]; Seneca Foundation Murcia (Spain) [19892/GERM/15]; Swedish Research Council (VR) [521-2011-6353]; Swedish Research Council Formas [221-2011-512]; Research Council in Southeast Sweden (FORSS), Sweden [378091/312971]; Seneca Foundation (Murcia, Spain); MECD (Madrid, Spain)

Available from: 2016-08-01 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Balao da Silva, C. M., Ortega-Ferrusola, C., Morrell, J. M., Rodriguez-Martinez, H. & Pena, F. J. (2016). Flow Cytometric Chromosomal Sex Sorting of Stallion Spermatozoa Induces Oxidative Stress on Mitochondria and Genomic DNA. Reproduction in domestic animals, 51(1), 18-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flow Cytometric Chromosomal Sex Sorting of Stallion Spermatozoa Induces Oxidative Stress on Mitochondria and Genomic DNA
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2016 (English)In: Reproduction in domestic animals, ISSN 0936-6768, E-ISSN 1439-0531, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To date, the only repeatable method to select spermatozoa for chromosomal sex is the Beltsville sorting technology using flow cytometry. Improvement of this technology in the equine species requires increasing awareness of the modifications that the sorting procedure induces on sperm intactness. Oxidative stress is regarded as the major damaging phenomenon, and increasing evidence regards handling of spermatozoa - including sex sorting - as basic ground for oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to disclose whether the flow cytometric sorting procedure increases the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and to identify if ROS production relates to DNA damage in sorted spermatozoa using specific flow cytometry-based assays. After sorting, oxidative stress increased from 26% to 33% in pre-and post-incubation controls, to 46% after sex sorting (p < 0.05). Proportions of DNA fragmentation index post-sorting were approximately 10% higher (31.3%); an effect apparently conduced via oxidative DNA damage as revealed by the oxyDNA assay. The probable origin of this increased oxidative stress owes the removal of enough seminal plasma due to the unphysiological sperm extension, alongside a deleterious effect of high pressure on mitochondria during the sorting procedure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127456 (URN)10.1111/rda.12640 (DOI)000373107600003 ()26592367 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad-FEDER in Madrid, Spain [AGL2013-43211-R]; Gobierno de Extremadura-FEDER [GR 10010, PCE1002]

Available from: 2016-04-30 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Vicente-Carrillo, A., Ekwall, H., Álvarez-Rodríguez, M. & Rodriguez-Martinez, H. (2016). Membrane Stress During Thawing Elicits Redistribution of Aquaporin 7 But Not of Aquaporin 9 in Boar Spermatozoa. Reproduction in domestic animals, 51(5), 665-679
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Membrane Stress During Thawing Elicits Redistribution of Aquaporin 7 But Not of Aquaporin 9 in Boar Spermatozoa
2016 (English)In: Reproduction in domestic animals, ISSN 0936-6768, E-ISSN 1439-0531, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 665-679Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Freezing of boar spermatozoa includes the cryoprotectant glycerol, but renders low cryosurvival, owing to major changes in osmolarity during freezing/thawing. We hypothesize that aquaporins (AQPs) 7 and 9 adapt their membrane domain location to these osmotic challenges, thus maintaining sperm homeostasis. Western blotting (WB) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) at light and electron microscope levels with several commercial primary antibodies and protocols explored AQP location on cauda epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa (from different fractions of the ejaculate), unprocessed, extended, chilled and frozen-thawed. Although differences in WB and ICC labelling were seen among antibodies, AQP-7 was conspicuously located in the entire tail and cytoplasmic droplet in caudal spermatozoa, being restricted to the mid-piece and principal piece domains in ejaculated spermatozoa. AQP-9 was mainly localized in the sperm head in both caudal and ejaculated spermatozoa. While unaffected by chilling (+5°C), freezing and thawing of ejaculated spermatozoa clearly relocated the head labelling of AQP-7, but not that of AQP-9. In vitro mimicking of cell membrane expansion during quick thawing maintained the localization of AQP-9 but relocated AQP-7 towards the acrosome. AQP-7, but not AQP-9, appears as a relevant marker for non-empirical studies of sperm handling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Verlag, 2016
National Category
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130228 (URN)10.1111/rda.12728 (DOI)000388334100005 ()27405395 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council VR, Stockholm [521-2011-6553]; Research Council FORMAS, Stockholm [221-2011-512]; FORSS (Forskningsradet i Sydostra Sverige), Sweden [473121]

Available from: 2016-07-19 Created: 2016-07-19 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Roca, J., Parrilla, I., Gil, M. A., Cuello, C., Martinez, E. A. & Rodriguez-Martinez, H. (2016). Non-viable sperm in the ejaculate: Lethal escorts for Contemporary viable sperm. Animal Reproduction Science, 169, 24-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-viable sperm in the ejaculate: Lethal escorts for Contemporary viable sperm
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2016 (English)In: Animal Reproduction Science, ISSN 0378-4320, E-ISSN 1873-2232, Vol. 169, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Non-viable sperm ("dead sperm") are present invariable numbers in mammalian ejaculates and their number increase substantially when semen is stored, particularly cryopreserved. This review comparatively highlights, with experimental data in porcine, the role-played by non-viable sperm in the outcome of semen used in assisted reproductive technologies. As well, the review discusses our current understanding of their origin and the pathways involved when their large numbers negative influence the functional lifespan of contemporary viable sperm to eventually cause irreversible dysfunction that reduces their fertility potential and their ability to develop healthy embryos. Finally, it highlights procedures currently available to mitigate these harmful effects. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2016
Keywords
Dead sperm; Apoptosis; Necrosis; Oxidative stress; Livestock species
National Category
Other Veterinary Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129667 (URN)10.1016/j.anireprosci.2016.02.028 (DOI)000377232600005 ()26948922 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Regional Development Fund; Spanish Government (MINECO-FEDER) [AGL2012-39903, MINECO AGL2015-69738-R]; Seneca Foundation of Murcia [19892/GERM/15]; Swedish Research Council VR, Stockholm, Sweden [2011-6353]; Swedish Research Council FORMAS, Stockholm, Sweden [2011-512]; Swedish Research Council FORSS, Stockholm, Sweden [312971]

Available from: 2016-06-27 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Vicente Carrillo, A., Alvarez-Rodriguez, M. & Rodriguez-Martinez, H. (2016). The mu (µ) and delta (δ) opioid receptors modulate boar sperm motility. Molecular Reproduction and Development, 83(8), 724-734
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The mu (µ) and delta (δ) opioid receptors modulate boar sperm motility
2016 (English)In: Molecular Reproduction and Development, ISSN 1040-452X, E-ISSN 1098-2795, Vol. 83, no 8, p. 724-734Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Endogenous and exogenous opioids modulate reproductive functions in target cells via opioid receptors (µ, δ, and κ). Sperm motility is a metric of gamete functionality, and serves as a suitable parameter for in vitro drug-induced toxicity assays. This study identifies the presence and location of opioid receptors in pig spermatozoa as well as their functional response after in vitro challenge with known agonists (morphine [µ]; [D-Pen 2,5]-enkephanile [δ]; and U 50488 [κ]) and antagonists (naloxone [µ]; naltrindole [δ]; and nor-binaltrorphimine [κ]). Only the µ- and δ-opioid receptors were present in the sperm plasma membrane, overlying the acrosome, neck, and principal piece. Challenge experiments with agonists and antagonists identified both µ- and δ-opioid receptors as regulators of sperm kinematics, wherein µ maintains or increases sperm movement whereas δ decreases sperm motility over time. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
opioids, membrane receptors, kinematics, pig
National Category
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130181 (URN)10.1002/mrd.22675 (DOI)000387014800007 ()27391529 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council VR, Stockholm [521-2011-6553]; Research Council FORMAS, Sweden [221-2011-512]; Research Council in Southeast Sweden (FORSS), Sweden [378091/31297]

Available from: 2016-07-14 Created: 2016-07-14 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5194-2124

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