liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Hackett, Joanne M.
Alternative names
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Rafat, M., Hackett, J., Fagerholm, P. & Griffith, M. (2011). Artificial Cornea. In: Darlene A. Dartt, Peter Bex, Patricia D'Amore, Reza Dana, Linda Mcloon, Jerry Niederkorn (Ed.), Ocular Periphery and Disorders: (pp. 311-317). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artificial Cornea
2011 (English)In: Ocular Periphery and Disorders / [ed] Darlene A. Dartt, Peter Bex, Patricia D'Amore, Reza Dana, Linda Mcloon, Jerry Niederkorn, Elsevier, 2011, p. 311-317Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This selection of articles from the Encyclopedia of the Eye is the first single-volume overview presenting articles on the function, biology, physiology, and pathology of the structures of the ocular periphery, as well as the related disorders and their treatment. The peripheral structures are implicated in a number of important diseases, including optic neuritis, thyroid eye disease, and strabismus. The volume offers a basic science background of these topics rather than a strictly clinical focus.

*The first single volume to integrate comparative studies into a comprehensive resource on the neuroscience of the ocular periphery

*Chapters are carefully selected from the Encyclopedia of the Eye by the world's leading vision researchers

*The best researchers in the field provide their conclusions in the context of the latest experimental results

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74724 (URN)978-0-12-382042-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-02-06 Created: 2012-02-06 Last updated: 2015-02-20Bibliographically approved
Hackett, J. M., Lagali, N., Merrett, K., Edelhauser, H., Sun, Y., Gan, L., . . . Fagerholm, P. (2011). Biosynthetic corneal implants for replacement of pathologic corneal tissue: performance in a controlled rabbit alkali burn model. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 52(2), 651-657
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biosynthetic corneal implants for replacement of pathologic corneal tissue: performance in a controlled rabbit alkali burn model
Show others...
2011 (English)In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 651-657Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To evaluate the performance of structurally reinforced, stabilized recombinant human collagen-phosphorylcholine (RHCIII-MPC) hydrogels as corneal substitutes in a rabbit model of severe corneal damage.

Methods: One eye each of 12 rabbits received a deep corneal alkali wound. Four corneas were implanted with RHCIII-MPC hydrogels. The other eight control corneas were implanted with either allografts or a simple crosslinked RHCIII hydrogel. In all cases, 6.25 mm diameter, 350 µm thick buttons were implanted by anterior lamellar keratoplasty to replace damaged corneal tissue. Implants were followed for nine months by clinical examination and in vivo confocal microscopy, after which implanted corneas were removed and processed for histopathological and ultrastructural examination.

Results: Alkali exposure induced extensive central corneal scarring, ocular surface irregularity, and neovascularization in one case. All implants showed complete epithelial coverage by four weeks post-operative, but with accompanying suture-induced vascularization in 6/12 cases. A stable, stratified epithelium with hemidesmosomal adhesion complexes regenerated over all implants, and subbasal nerve regeneration was observed in allograft and RHCIII-MPC implants. Initially acellular biosynthetic implants were populated with host-derived keratocytes as stromal haze subsided and stromal collagen was remodeled. Notably, RHCIII-MPC implants exhibited resistance to vascular ingrowth while supporting endogenous cell and nerve repopulation.

Conclusion: Biosynthetic implants based on RHC promoted cell and nerve repopulation in alkali burned rabbit eyes. In RHCIII-MPC implants, evidence of an enhanced resistance to neovascularization was additionally noted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Research in Vision and Opthalmology, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65890 (URN)10.1167/iovs.10-5224 (DOI)000287846300002 ()
Note
Original Publication: Joanne M. Hackett, Neil Lagali, Kimberley Merrett, Henry Edelhauser, Yifei Sun, Lisha Gan, May Griffith and Per Fagerholm, Biosynthetic corneal implants for replacement of pathologic corneal tissue: performance in a controlled rabbit alkali burn model, 2011, Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/iovs.10-5224 Copyright: Research in Vision and Opthalmology http://www.arvo.org/Available from: 2011-02-24 Created: 2011-02-24 Last updated: 2018-01-22
Hackett, J. M., Dang, T. T., Tsai, E. C. & Cao, X. (2010). Electrospun Biocomposite Polycaprolactone/Collagen Tubes as Scaffolds for Neural Stem Cell Differentiation. Materials, 3(6), 3714-3728
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electrospun Biocomposite Polycaprolactone/Collagen Tubes as Scaffolds for Neural Stem Cell Differentiation
2010 (English)In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 3714-3728Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies using cellular therapies, scaffolds, and tubular structured implants have been carried out with the goal to restore functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). None of these therapeutic strategies, by themselves, have been shown to be sufficient to achieve complete restoration of function. To reverse the devastating effects of SCI, an interdisciplinary approach that combines materials science and engineering, stem cell biology, and neurosurgery is being carried out. We are currently investigating a scaffold that has the ability to deliver growth factors for the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous stem cells. Neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from mice are being used to assess the efficacy of the release of growth factors from the scaffold in vitro. The fabrication of the tubular implant allows a porous scaffold to be formed, which aids in the release of growth factors added to the scaffold.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI AG, 2010
Keywords
neurospheres, nerve tissue engineering, electrospun nanofibers, differentiation
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103164 (URN)10.3390/ma3063714 (DOI)000298241700012 ()
Available from: 2014-01-14 Created: 2014-01-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications