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Bidleman, T., Andersson, A., Jantunen, L., Kucklick, J., Kylin, H., Letcher, R., . . . Wong, F. (2019). A review of halogenated natural products in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems. Emerging Contaminants, 5, 89-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of halogenated natural products in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordic ecosystems
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2019 (English)In: Emerging Contaminants, ISSN 2405-6650, E-ISSN 2405-6642, Vol. 5, p. 89-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Halogenated natural products (HNPs) are organic compounds containing bromine, chlorine, iodine, andrarely fluorine. HNPs comprise many classes of compounds, ranging in complexity from halocarbons tohigher molecular weight compounds, which often contain oxygen and/or nitrogen atoms in addition tohalogens. Many HNPs are biosynthesized by marine bacteria, macroalgae, phytoplankton, tunicates,corals, worms, sponges and other invertebrates. This paper reviews HNPs in Arctic, Subarctic and Nordicecosystems and is based on sections of Chapter 2.16 in the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program(AMAP) assessment Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern (AMAP, 2017) which deal with the highermolecular weight HNPs. Material is updated and expanded to include more Nordic examples. Much ofthe chapter is devoted to “bromophenolic” HNPs, viz bromophenols (BPs) and transformation productsbromoanisoles (BAs), hydroxylated and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (OH-BDEs, MeO-BDEs) andpolybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), since these HNPs are most frequently reported. Othersdiscussed are 2,20-dimethoxy-3,30,5,50-tetrabromobiphenyl (2,20-dimethoxy-BB80), polyhalogenated 10-methyl-1,20-bipyrroles (PMBPs), polyhalogenated 1,10-dimethyl-2,20-bipyrroles (PDBPs), polyhalogenatedN-methylpyrroles (PMPs), polyhalogenated N-methylindoles (PMIs), bromoheptyl- and bromooctylpyrroles, (1R,2S,4R,5R,10E)-2-bromo-1-bromomethyl-1,4-dichloro-5-(20-chloroethenyl)-5-methylcyclohexane (mixed halogenated compound MHC-1), polybrominated hexahydroxanthene derivatives(PBHDs) and polyhalogenated carbazoles (PHCs). Aspects of HNPs covered are physicochemicalproperties, sources and production, transformation processes, concentrations and trends in the physicalenvironment and biota (marine and freshwater). Toxic properties of some HNPs and a discussion of howclimate change might affect HNPs production and distribution are also included. The review concludeswith a summary of research needs to better understand the role of HNPs as “chemicals of emergingArctic concern”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Halogenated natural products, HNP, Arctic, Scandinavia, Baltic Sea, air, water, sediment, biota, physicochemical properties, Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Geochemistry Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155071 (URN)10.1016/j.emcon.2019.02.007 (DOI)2-s2.0-85062597990 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Kylin, H. (2019). Buller inte orsak till talgoxens ändrade sång. Vår Fågelvärld (3), 58-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Buller inte orsak till talgoxens ändrade sång
2019 (Swedish)In: Vår Fågelvärld, ISSN 0042-2649, no 3, p. 58-59Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mörbylånga, Sweden: Sveriges Ornitologiska Förening, 2019
Keywords
Talgoxe, sång, buller
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160015 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
van Aswegen, J., Nel, L., Strydom, N., Minnaar, K. & Kylin, H. (2019). Comparing the metallic elemental compositions of Kelp Gull Larus dominicanus eggs and eggshells from the Swartkops Estuary, Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Chemosphere, 221, 533-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing the metallic elemental compositions of Kelp Gull Larus dominicanus eggs and eggshells from the Swartkops Estuary, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
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2019 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 221, p. 533-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Metals attributed to pollution may increase their concentrations above the geological background and pose toxic challenges towards humans and biota. We analysed sixteen Kelp Gull eggs and eggshells for 30 metallic elements from the Swartkops Estuary (SE), an important recreational, industrial, and ecological asset for Port Elizabeth, the region, and South Africa. Mean concentrations for eggshell and egg content for Hg was 0.02 and 0.4 mg/kg dm, Cr was 4 and 18 mg/kg dm (the highest yet recorded for any gull or tern egg), for Zn 2.1 and 62 mg/kg dm, for Sr 880 and 12 mg/kg dm, for V 170 and 1.3 mg/kg dm, and for Co 1.7 and 0.002 mg/kg dm, respectively. Zink, Se, and Hg, increased on a dry-mass basis from sediment via small fish to gull egg content, indicating bioaccumulation. No effect on eggshell thickness was seen. We also determined that eggshell concentrations cannot be used as a proxy for egg content concentrations. Mercury, Cr, V, Co, and Zn were elements we identified as potentially problematic that require source identification and mitigation. Further research into other high-trophic animals such as herons, egrets, cormorants, and otters in the SE system is proposed.

Keywords
Ecotoxicology, heavy metals, gull egg physiology, Indian Ocean
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology Zoology Occupational Health and Environmental Health Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153893 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.01.013 (DOI)000460710700060 ()30660910 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: National Research Foundation (NRF) [93977]

Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2019-04-01
Andersson, A., Ashiq, M. J., Shoeb, M., Karlsson, S., Bastviken, D. & Kylin, H. (2019). Evaluating gas chromatography with a halogen-specific detectorfor the determination of disinfection by-products in drinking water. Environmental science and pollution research international, 26, 7305-7314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating gas chromatography with a halogen-specific detectorfor the determination of disinfection by-products in drinking water
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2019 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 26, p. 7305-7314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The occurrence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has become an issue of concern during the past decades. The DBPs pose health risks and are suspected to cause various cancer forms, be genotoxic and have negative developmental effects. The vast chemical diversity of DBPs makes comprehensive monitoring challenging. Only few of the DBPs are regulated and included in analytical protocols. In this study, a method for simultaneous measurement of 20 DBPs from five different structural classes (both regulated and non-regulated) was investigated and further developed for 11 DBPs using solid phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled with a halogen specific detector (XSD). The XSD was highly selective towards halogenated DBPs, providing chromatograms with little noise. The method allowed detection down to 0.05 µg/L and showed promising results for the simultaneous determination of a range of neutral DBP classes. Compounds from two classes of emerging DBPs, more cytotoxic than the “traditional” regulated DBPs, were successfully determined using this method. However, haloacetic acids (HAAs) should be analyzed separately as some HAA methyl esters may degrade giving false positives of trihalomethanes (THMs). The method was tested on real water samples from two municipal waterworks where the target DBP concentrations were found below the regulatory limits of Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2019
Keywords
Drinking water, Disinfection by-products, Trihalomethanes, Haloacetic acids, Haloacetonitriles, Halogen-specific detector
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145402 (URN)10.1007/s11356-018-1419-2 (DOI)000463824600002 ()29492811 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-1077
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development, FORMAS [2013-1077]

Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, J., Andersson, A., Johannisson, A., Lavonen, E., Mandava, G., Kylin, H., . . . Oskarsson, A. (2019). Innovative drinking water treatment techniques reduce the disinfection-induced oxidative stress and genotoxic activity. Water Research, 5, 182-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovative drinking water treatment techniques reduce the disinfection-induced oxidative stress and genotoxic activity
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2019 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 5, p. 182-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disinfection of drinking water using chlorine can lead to the formation of genotoxic by-products whenchlorine reacts with natural organic matter (NOM). A vast number of such disinfection by-products(DBPs) have been identified, making it almost impossible to routinely monitor all DBPs with chemicalanalysis. In this study, a bioanalytical approach was used, measuring oxidative stress (Nrf2 activity),genotoxicity (micronucleus test), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation to evaluate an innovativewater treatment process, including suspended ion exchange, ozonation, in-line coagulation,ceramic microfiltration, and granular activated carbon. Chlorination was performed in laboratory scaleafter each step in the treatment process in order to investigate the effect of each treatment process to theformation of DBPs. Suspended ion exchange had a high capacity to remove dissolved organic carbon(DOC) and to decrease UV absorbance and Nrf2 activity in non-chlorinated water. High-dose chlorination(10 mg Cl2 L-1) of raw water caused a drastic induction of Nrf2 activity, which was decreased by 70% inwater chlorinated after suspended ion exchange. Further reduction of Nrf2 activity following chlorinationwas achieved by ozonation and the concomitant treatment steps. The ozonation treatment resulted indecreased Nrf2 activity in spite of unchanged DOC levels. However, a strong correlation was found betweenUV absorbing compounds and Nrf2 activity, demonstrating that Nrf2 inducing DBPs were formedfrom pre-cursors of a specific NOM fraction, constituted of mainly aromatic compounds. Moreover, highdosechlorination of raw water induced genotoxicity. In similarity to the DOC levels, UV absorbance andNrf2 activity, the disinfection-induced genotoxicity was also reduced by each treatment step of theinnovative water treatment technique. AhR activity was observed in the water produced by the conventionalprocess and in the raw water, but the activity was clearly decreased by the ozonation step inthe innovative water treatment process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Drinking water, disinfection byproducts, oxidative stress, Nrf2, genotoxicity
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155072 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2019.02.052 (DOI)000464488500018 ()30849732 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062423705 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-01077
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council Formas, Sweden [2014-1435, 2012-2124, 2018-02191, 2013-01077]; Linkoping University; SLU environmental monitoring programme on a Nontoxic environment

Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Harir, M., Gonsior, M., Hertkorn, N., Schmitt-Kopplin, P., Kylin, H., . . . Bastviken, D. (2019). Waterworks-specific composition of drinking water disinfection by-products. Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology (5), 861-872
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waterworks-specific composition of drinking water disinfection by-products
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, ISSN 2053-1419, no 5, p. 861-872Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reactions between chemical disinfectants and natural organic matter (NOM) upon drinking water treatment result in formation of potentially harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs). The diversity of DBPs formed is high and a large portion remains unknown. Previous studies have shown that non-volatile DBPs are important, as much of the total toxicity from DBPs has been related to this fraction. To further understand the composition and variation of DBPs associated with this fraction, non-target analysis with ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was employed to detect DBPs at four Swedish waterworks using different types of raw water and treatments. Samples were collected five times covering a full year. A common group of DBPs formed at all four waterworks was detected, suggesting a similar pool of DBP precursors in all raw waters that might be related to phenolic moieties. However, the largest proportion (64–92%) of the assigned chlorinated and brominated molecular formulae were unique, i.e. were solely found in one of the four waterworks. In contrast, the compositional variations of NOM in the raw waters and samples collected prior to chemical disinfection were rather limited.This indicated that waterworks-specific DBPs presumably originated from matrix effects at the point of disinfection, primarily explained by differences in bromide levels, disinfectants (chlorine versus chloramine) and different relative abundances of isomers among the NOM compositions studied. The large variation of observed DBPs in the toxicologically relevant non-volatile fraction indicates that non-targeted monitoring strategies might be valuable to ensure relevant DBP monitoring in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
Keywords
Drinking water, Drinking water treatment, Disinfection, Disinfection by-products, DBP, Chlorine, Chloramine, natural organic matter, high resolution mass spectrometry, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, FT-ICR MS, Dricksvatten, Desinfektionsbiprodukter, Klor, Kloramin, Reningsprocesser, Naturligt organiskt material
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Organic Chemistry Environmental Sciences Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156342 (URN)10.1039/c9ew00034h (DOI)000471671000004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-1077
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development, FORMAS [2013-1077]; University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science [5618]

Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-07-15Bibliographically approved
Kylin, H. (2018). Alla auktoriteter är inte onda - men vilka kan vi lita på?. Universitetsläraren (2), pp. 46-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alla auktoriteter är inte onda - men vilka kan vi lita på?
2018 (Swedish)In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 2, p. 46-46Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Jag har skådat i ”Mörkrets hjärta”. För tio år sedan bad WWF om hjälp med miljö­övervakning i Kongo. Som andra besök i länder med dåligt fungerande demokrati gav det mig anledning att fundera över auktoriteter, politiska och vetenskapliga. Det finns utmärkta forskare i u-länder, men många hämmas av en svår brist på infrastruktur och materiel. Men akademierna, liksom politiken, lider framför allt av ”big men” med ”naturgiven” bestämmanderätt. Jo, det har blivit bättre med åren, och visst finns det sådana personer även i vår akademi....

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Sveriges Universitetslärarförbund, 2018
Keywords
Auktoriteter, auktoritetstro, Kongo
National Category
History of Ideas Philosophy Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146052 (URN)
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Kylin, H. (2018). Hypotesdriven forskning: inte enda alternativet. Universitetsläraren (7), 44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypotesdriven forskning: inte enda alternativet
2018 (Swedish)In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 7, p. 44-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm, Sweden: Sveriges Universitetslärarförbund, 2018
Keywords
Uppsalaskolan, emikation, ismås
National Category
History of Ideas Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153429 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
du Preez, M., Govender, D., Kylin, H. & Bouwman, H. (2018). Metallic elements in Nile Crocodile eggs from the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 148, 930-941
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metallic elements in Nile Crocodile eggs from the Kruger National Park, South Africa
2018 (English)In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 148, p. 930-941Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Nile Crocodile is the largest predator on the African continent. Recent mass mortalities in the Kruger National Park (KNP) raised concerns about possible influence of pollution. We analysed eggs and their eggshells collected from nests inside the KNP and from a crocodile farm for metallic elements. We found that mercury, selenium, and copper occurred at levels of concern. Eggshells had very high concentrations of iron. Apart from toxicological implications associated with elevated concentrations in eggs, we found iron possibly contributing towards thicker eggshells. Thicker shells may act as a barrier to gas and water exchange, as well as possibly increasing the effort required for the hatchling to emerge from tightly packed shells under sand. Pollutants are transported into the KNP via rivers, and possibly via air. Mercury and copper pollution are waste-, industrial- and mining-related; ecotoxicological concern should therefore be extended to all areas where the four African crocodile species occur. Reptiles are under-represented in ecotoxicological literature in general, and especially from Africa. We know of only one previous report on metals and metalloids in crocodile eggs from Africa (Zimbabwe), published 30 years ago. Reduced fitness, endocrine disruption and effects on behaviour are other possible sub-lethal effects associated with metallic elements that may only become apparent decades later in a long-lived species such as the Nile Crocodile. In the face of habitat destruction, pollution, human population increases, and climate change, further research is needed regarding pollutant concentrations and effects in all African reptiles . The rivers that carry water from outside the park sustain its aquatic life, but also transport pollutants into the KNP. Therefore, improved source mitigation remains an important task and responsibility for all involved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2018
Keywords
Ecotoxicology, aquatic ecology, reptile, eggshell, mercury, selenium, copper
National Category
Ecology Other Veterinary Science Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143816 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.11.032 (DOI)000429892700108 ()2-s2.0-85036659815 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies; Ruppert Foundation; National Research Foundation of South Africa (NRF); South African Department of Science and Technology

Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-05-23Bibliographically approved
Gurjazkaite, K., Routh, J., Djamali, M., Vaezi, A., Poher, Y., Beni, A. N., . . . Kylin, H. (2018). Vegetation history and human-environment interactions through the late Holocene in Konar Sandal, SE Iran. Quaternary Science Reviews, 194, 143-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vegetation history and human-environment interactions through the late Holocene in Konar Sandal, SE Iran
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2018 (English)In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 194, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Jiroft valley, situated on banks of the Halil Rud developed as an important agricultural and trading center during the Early Bronze Age. Known for its famous steatite sculptures and clay pottery, the first settlement in Konar Sandal collapsed around 3rd millennium BCE. A second shorter, but major phase of occupation in the settlement occurred towards the end of 2nd millennium BCE. A 250-cm long peat sequence near the archaeological complex at Konar Sandal was investigated to reconstruct the human environment history using palynological, sedimentological and geochemical data. With a basal age of 4 ka, the core traces the hydroclimatic changes and human activities that started just after large scale abandonment of Konar Sandal and extends from the late Bronze Age to the Mongol invasion. The results show that Jiroft had an arid dry climate dominated by the Saharo-Sindian open pseudo-savanna vegetation. However, due to human clearance and intensified agro-sylvo-pastoral activities, and climatic factors, the land-cover shifted from open xeric scrublands to a more open degraded landscape. The principal human occupation was cereal cultivation and herding. However, it is likely that during the more arid periods, communities retreated and abandoned agriculture, facilitating successional processes. Such droughts occurred around 4.0-3.8 ka and 3.4-2.8 ka and are related to the Siberian Anticyclonic system. Declining Artemisia and shrubs indicate milder climates ca. 3.8-3.4 ka and 2.8-0.6 ka. The latter period that started with the rule of the Persian empires (550-650 BCE), and continued through the Islamic era, coincides with intensive human activities, and the highest degradation of vegetation. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2018
Keywords
Agro-pastoralism; Climate; Halil Rud; Late Holocene; Peat; Pollen; Vegetation history
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150861 (URN)10.1016/j.quascirev.2018.06.026 (DOI)000441487700011 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, E0402601
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5972-1852

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