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Kylin, H. (2018). Alla auktoriteter är inte onda - men vilka kan vi lita på?. Universitetsläraren (2), pp. 46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alla auktoriteter är inte onda - men vilka kan vi lita på?
2018 (Swedish)In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 2, p. 46-Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sveriges Universitetslärarförbund, 2018
Keywords
Auktoriteter, auktoritetstro, Kongo
National Category
History of Ideas Philosophy Other Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146052 (URN)
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Ashiq, M. J., Shoeb, M., Karlsson, S., Bastviken, D. & Kylin, H. (2018). Evaluating gas chromatography with a halogen-specific detectorfor the determination of disinfection by-products in drinking water. Environmental science and pollution research international
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating gas chromatography with a halogen-specific detectorfor the determination of disinfection by-products in drinking water
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2018 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The occurrence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has become an issue of concern during the past decades. The DBPs pose health risks and are suspected to cause various cancer forms, be genotoxic and have negative developmental effects. The vast chemical diversity of DBPs makes comprehensive monitoring challenging. Only few of the DBPs are regulated and included in analytical protocols. In this study, a method for simultaneous measurement of 20 DBPs from five different structural classes (both regulated and non-regulated) was investigated and further developed for 11 DBPs using solid phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled with a halogen specific detector (XSD). The XSD was highly selective towards halogenated DBPs, providing chromatograms with little noise. The method allowed detection down to 0.05 µg/L and showed promising results for the simultaneous determination of a range of neutral DBP classes. Compounds from two classes of emerging DBPs, more cytotoxic than the “traditional” regulated DBPs, were successfully determined using this method. However, haloacetic acids (HAAs) should be analyzed separately as some HAA methyl esters may degrade giving false positives of trihalomethanes (THMs). The method was tested on real water samples from two municipal waterworks where the target DBP concentrations were found below the regulatory limits of Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2018
Keywords
Drinking water, Disinfection by-products, Trihalomethanes, Haloacetic acids, Haloacetonitriles, Halogen-specific detector
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145402 (URN)10.1007/s11356-018-1419-2 (DOI)29492811 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-1077
Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
du Preez, M., Govender, D., Kylin, H. & Bouwman, H. (2018). Metallic elements in Nile Crocodile eggs from the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 148, 930-941
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metallic elements in Nile Crocodile eggs from the Kruger National Park, South Africa
2018 (English)In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 148, p. 930-941Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Nile Crocodile is the largest predator on the African continent. Recent mass mortalities in the Kruger National Park (KNP) raised concerns about possible influence of pollution. We analysed eggs and their eggshells collected from nests inside the KNP and from a crocodile farm for metallic elements. We found that mercury, selenium, and copper occurred at levels of concern. Eggshells had very high concentrations of iron. Apart from toxicological implications associated with elevated concentrations in eggs, we found iron possibly contributing towards thicker eggshells. Thicker shells may act as a barrier to gas and water exchange, as well as possibly increasing the effort required for the hatchling to emerge from tightly packed shells under sand. Pollutants are transported into the KNP via rivers, and possibly via air. Mercury and copper pollution are waste-, industrial- and mining-related; ecotoxicological concern should therefore be extended to all areas where the four African crocodile species occur. Reptiles are under-represented in ecotoxicological literature in general, and especially from Africa. We know of only one previous report on metals and metalloids in crocodile eggs from Africa (Zimbabwe), published 30 years ago. Reduced fitness, endocrine disruption and effects on behaviour are other possible sub-lethal effects associated with metallic elements that may only become apparent decades later in a long-lived species such as the Nile Crocodile. In the face of habitat destruction, pollution, human population increases, and climate change, further research is needed regarding pollutant concentrations and effects in all African reptiles . The rivers that carry water from outside the park sustain its aquatic life, but also transport pollutants into the KNP. Therefore, improved source mitigation remains an important task and responsibility for all involved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2018
Keywords
Ecotoxicology, aquatic ecology, reptile, eggshell, mercury, selenium, copper
National Category
Ecology Other Veterinary Science Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143816 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.11.032 (DOI)000429892700108 ()2-s2.0-85036659815 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies; Ruppert Foundation; National Research Foundation of South Africa (NRF); South African Department of Science and Technology

Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-05-23Bibliographically approved
Gurjazkaite, K., Routh, J., Djamali, M., Vaezi, A., Poher, Y., Beni, A. N., . . . Kylin, H. (2018). Vegetation history and human-environment interactions through the late Holocene in Konar Sandal, SE Iran. Quaternary Science Reviews, 194, 143-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vegetation history and human-environment interactions through the late Holocene in Konar Sandal, SE Iran
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2018 (English)In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 194, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Jiroft valley, situated on banks of the Halil Rud developed as an important agricultural and trading center during the Early Bronze Age. Known for its famous steatite sculptures and clay pottery, the first settlement in Konar Sandal collapsed around 3rd millennium BCE. A second shorter, but major phase of occupation in the settlement occurred towards the end of 2nd millennium BCE. A 250-cm long peat sequence near the archaeological complex at Konar Sandal was investigated to reconstruct the human environment history using palynological, sedimentological and geochemical data. With a basal age of 4 ka, the core traces the hydroclimatic changes and human activities that started just after large scale abandonment of Konar Sandal and extends from the late Bronze Age to the Mongol invasion. The results show that Jiroft had an arid dry climate dominated by the Saharo-Sindian open pseudo-savanna vegetation. However, due to human clearance and intensified agro-sylvo-pastoral activities, and climatic factors, the land-cover shifted from open xeric scrublands to a more open degraded landscape. The principal human occupation was cereal cultivation and herding. However, it is likely that during the more arid periods, communities retreated and abandoned agriculture, facilitating successional processes. Such droughts occurred around 4.0-3.8 ka and 3.4-2.8 ka and are related to the Siberian Anticyclonic system. Declining Artemisia and shrubs indicate milder climates ca. 3.8-3.4 ka and 2.8-0.6 ka. The latter period that started with the rule of the Persian empires (550-650 BCE), and continued through the Islamic era, coincides with intensive human activities, and the highest degradation of vegetation. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2018
Keywords
Agro-pastoralism; Climate; Halil Rud; Late Holocene; Peat; Pollen; Vegetation history
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150861 (URN)10.1016/j.quascirev.2018.06.026 (DOI)000441487700011 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, E0402601
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Shoeb, M., Mondal, P., Kylin, H. & Nahar, N. (2017). Chemical and biological activity of mushrooms naturally occurring in Bangladesh. Asian Journal of Pharmacognosy, 1(3), 42-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical and biological activity of mushrooms naturally occurring in Bangladesh
2017 (English)In: Asian Journal of Pharmacognosy, E-ISSN 0128-1119, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 42-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Five freeze-dried mushroom species namely Agaricus bisporus, Coprinus micaceus, Pleurotus ostreatus, Termitomyces clypeatus and T. heimii were extracted separately with dichloromethane:methanol followed by partitioned using hexane, dichloromethane and methanol. Silica gel column chromatography of hexane extract of T. heimii and dichloromethane extract of P. ostreatus afforded 2,4-di-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid and 2-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid, respectively. The n-hexane extracts of mushrooms were analyzed for the presence of n-alkanes and fatty acid compositions. n-Alkanes were found in T. heimii only. Different extracts of mushrooms were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi, general toxicity and antioxidant activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Asian Society of Pharmacognosy, 2017
Keywords
Agaricus, Coprinus, Pleurotus, Termitomyces, natural products from mushrooms, traditional medicine
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138007 (URN)
Available from: 2017-06-05 Created: 2017-06-05 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Kylin, H. (2017). Det var allmänt känt att lämlarna förr från himlen. Universitetsläraren (3), 48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det var allmänt känt att lämlarna förr från himlen
2017 (Swedish)In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 3, p. 48-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Sveriges universitetslärarförbund (SULF), 2017
Keywords
Interkulturell kommunikation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Ecology History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136905 (URN)
Note

Krönika

Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Bidleman, T., Kucklick, J., Kylin, H., Letcher, R., Jantunen, L. & Wong, F. (2017). Halogenated Natural Products. In: AMAP Assessment 2016: Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern: (pp. 243-267). Oslo, Norway: AMAP
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Halogenated Natural Products
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2017 (English)In: AMAP Assessment 2016: Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern, Oslo, Norway: AMAP , 2017, p. 243-267Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo, Norway: AMAP, 2017
Keywords
Halogenated natural products, natural halogenation
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145556 (URN)9788279711049 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Kylin, H. & Muir, D. (2017). Pentachlorophenol (PCP) and pentachloroanisole (PCA). In: AMAP Assessment 2016: Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern (pp. 205-211). Oslo: Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pentachlorophenol (PCP) and pentachloroanisole (PCA)
2017 (English)In: AMAP Assessment 2016: Chemicals of Emerging Arctic Concern, Oslo: Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) , 2017, p. 205-211Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was first synthesized for use as a fungicide for wood protection in the 1930s. PCP affects most organisms by decoupling oxidative phosphorylation and other crucial biochemical functions (IPCS, 1987; UNEP, 2013e). As a result it has found a wide range of biocidal and pesticidal uses. Due to adverse environmental and health effects, restrictions  on the use of PCP were first imposed in the 1970s with total bans in effect in some countries by the 1980s (UNEP, 2013d). As of 2014, PCP was still in use in India, Canada and the USA (UNEP, 2014a). In May 2015, PCP was included in Annex A of the Stockholm Convention: calling for elimination, with a time-limited exemption for impregnation of utility poles and crossarms (UNEP, 2015a).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), 2017
Keywords
Pentachlropheno. PCP, Pentachloroanisole, PCA
National Category
Environmental Sciences Geochemistry Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Biological Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144539 (URN)9788279711049 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-26 Created: 2018-01-26 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved
Cotgreave, I., Ghavanini, A. A., Alfaro-Moreno, E., Bergman, Å., Cederbrant, K., Forsby, A., . . . Knudsen, L. (2016). Pyriproxifen and microcephaly: an investigation of potential ties to the ongoing "Zika epidemic". Södertälje: Swetox
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pyriproxifen and microcephaly: an investigation of potential ties to the ongoing "Zika epidemic"
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2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As part of the Swetox mission to react to emerging concerns in chemical health and environmental safety, a preliminary litterature investigation was undertaken to gather all readily available scientific information on PPF with respect to safety assessment, in order to better understand potential links between chemical exposure and the devopment of microcephaly in affected areas. Therefore the contents of the report do not constitute an attempt at either questioning the use of existing regulatory data in the manner prescribed by international regulatory proceedures, or as a new risk assessment, based on the scientific information and concepts discussed. Here we report our findings, with particular emphasis on exisiting regulatory information, potential for lack of translation of results from regulatory animal testing to humans, lack of human exposure data and suggestions on plausible mode(s) of action of PPF in human neurodevelopmental adversities such as microcephaly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Södertälje: Swetox, 2016. p. 15
Keywords
Mikrocefali, zikavirus, pyriproxifen
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126096 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-14 Created: 2016-03-14 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Bouwman, H., Evans, S., Cole, N., Choong Kwer Yive, N. S. & Kylin, H. (2016). The flip-or-flop boutique: Marine debris on the shores of St Brandon’s Rock, an isolated tropical atoll in the Indian Ocean. Marine Environmental Research, 114, 58-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The flip-or-flop boutique: Marine debris on the shores of St Brandon’s Rock, an isolated tropical atoll in the Indian Ocean
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2016 (English)In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 114, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Isolated coral atolls are not immune from marine debris accumulation. We identified Southeast Asia, the Indian sub-continent, and the countries on the Arabian Sea as most probable source areas of 50 000 items on the shores of St. Brandon’s Rock (SBR), Indian Ocean. 79% of the debris was plastics. Flip-flops, energy drink bottles, and compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) were notable item types. The density of debris (0.74 m-1 shore length) is comparable to similar islands but less than mainland sites. Intact CFLs suggests product-facilitated long-range transport of mercury. We suspect that aggregated marine debris, scavenged by the islands from currents and gyres, could re-concentrate pollutants. SBR islets accumulated debris types in different proportions suggesting that many factors act variably on different debris types. Regular cleaning of selected islets will take care of most of the accumulated debris and may improve the ecology and tourism potential. However, arrangements and logistics require more study.

Keywords
Plastic, Polyurethane foam, Mercury, Management, Wreck, Compact fluorescent light
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123712 (URN)10.1016/j.marenvres.2015.12.013 (DOI)000370095600007 ()
Note

Funding agencies: South African Regional Cooperation Fund for Scientific Research and Technological Development [65290]

Available from: 2016-01-10 Created: 2016-01-10 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5972-1852

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