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Rådholm, Karin
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Pikkemaat, M., Andersson, T., Melander, O., Chalmers, J., Rådholm, K. & Bostrom, K. B. (2019). C-peptide predicts all-cause and cardiovascular death in a cohort of individuals with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. The Skaraborg diabetes register. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 150, 174-183
Open this publication in new window or tab >>C-peptide predicts all-cause and cardiovascular death in a cohort of individuals with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. The Skaraborg diabetes register
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2019 (English)In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 150, p. 174-183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

To study the association between baseline level of C-peptide and all-cause death, cardiovascular death and cardiovascular complications among persons with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

Methods

The Skaraborg Diabetes Register contains data on baseline C-peptide concentrations among 398 persons <65 years with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes 1996–1998. National registries were used to determine all-cause death, cardiovascular death and incidence of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke until 31 December 2014. The association between baseline C-peptide and outcomes were evaluated with adjustment for multiple confounders by Cox regression analysis. Missing data were handled by multiple imputation.

Results

In the imputed and fully adjusted model there was a significant association between 1 nmol/l increase in C-peptide concentration and all-cause death (HR 2.20, 95% CI 1.49–3.25, p < 0.001, number of events = 104), underlying cardiovascular death (HR 2.69, 1.49–4.85, p = 0.001, n = 35) and the composite outcome of underlying cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke (HR 1.61, 1.06–2.45, p = 0.027, n = 90).

Conclusions

Elevated C-peptide levels at baseline in persons with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. C-peptide might be used to identify persons at high risk of cardiovascular complications and premature death.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Type 2 diabetes mellitus; C-peptide; Mortality; Cardiovascular diseases; Cohort studies; Cause of death
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157555 (URN)10.1016/j.diabres.2019.03.014 (DOI)000467689500021 ()30878389 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063081718 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Skaraborg Research and Development Council; Skaraborg Institute for Research and Development; Skaraborg Primary Care Research and Development Council; Swedish Society of Medicine; Skane County Councils Research and Development Foundation; Esther Olssons and Anna Jonssons Foundation; Gorthons Foundation; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; Medical Faculty of Lund University; Skane University Hospital; Novo Nordisk Foundation

Available from: 2019-06-22 Created: 2019-06-22 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Rådholm, K., Figtree, G., Perkovic, V., Solomon, S. D., Mahaffey, K. W., de Zeeuw, D., . . . Neal, B. (2018). Canagliflozin and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Results From the CANVAS Program. Circulation, 138(5), 458-468
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Canagliflozin and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Results From the CANVAS Program
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2018 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 138, no 5, p. 458-468Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that reduces the risk of cardiovascular events. We report the effects on heart failure (HF) and cardiovascular death overall, in those with and without a baseline history of HF, and in other participant subgroups. Methods: The CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) enrolled 10142 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk. Participants were randomly assigned to canagliflozin or placebo and followed for a mean of 188 weeks. The primary end point for these analyses was adjudicated cardiovascular death or hospitalized HF. Results: Participants with a history of HF at baseline (14.4%) were more frequently women, white, and hypertensive and had a history of prior cardiovascular disease (all Pamp;lt;0.001). Greater proportions of these patients were using therapies such as blockers of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, diuretics, and -blockers at baseline (all Pamp;lt;0.001). Overall, cardiovascular death or hospitalized HF was reduced in those treated with canagliflozin compared with placebo (16.3 versus 20.8 per 1000 patient-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.91), as was fatal or hospitalized HF (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.89) and hospitalized HF alone (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87). The benefit on cardiovascular death or hospitalized HF may be greater in patients with a prior history of HF (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.80) compared with those without HF at baseline (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.72-1.06; P interaction =0.021). The effects of canagliflozin compared with placebo on other cardiovascular outcomes and key safety outcomes were similar in participants with and without HF at baseline (all interaction P values amp;gt;0.130), except for a possibly reduced absolute rate of events attributable to osmotic diuresis among those with a prior history of HF (P=0.03). Conclusions: In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, canagliflozin reduced the risk of cardiovascular death or hospitalized HF across a broad range of different patient subgroups. Benefits may be greater in those with a history of HF at baseline. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01032629 and NCT01989754.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2018
Keywords
canagliflozin; heart failure; randomized trial; SGLT2 inhibitor; type 2 diabetes mellitus
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150251 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.034222 (DOI)000440196500008 ()29526832 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Janssen Research & Development, LLC

Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2019-05-01
Rådholm, K., Wu, J. H. Y., Wong, M. G., Foote, C., Fulcher, G., Mahaffey, K. W., . . . Neal, B. (2018). Effects of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors on cardiovascular disease, death and safety outcomes in type 2 diabetes - A systematic review. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 140, 118-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors on cardiovascular disease, death and safety outcomes in type 2 diabetes - A systematic review
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2018 (English)In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 140, p. 118-128Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors appear to protect against increased risks of cardiovascular and kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes but also cause some harms. Whether effects are comparable across drug class or specific to individual compounds is unclear. This meta-analysis assessed the class and individual compound effects of SGLT2 inhibition versus control on cardiovascular events, death, kidney disease and safety outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and regulatory databases were systematically searched for data from randomized clinical trials that included reporting of cardiovascular events, deaths or safety outcomes. We used fixed effects models and inverse variance weighting to calculate relative risks with the 95% confidence intervals. Results: The analyses included data from 82 trials, four overviews and six regulatory reports and there were 1,968 major cardiovascular events identified for analysis. Patients randomly assigned to SGLT2 had lower risks of major cardiovascular events (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93), heart failure (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.55-0.80), all-cause death (RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.70-0.88) and serious decline in kidney function (RR 0.59, 0.49-0.71). Significant adverse effects were observed for genital infections (RR 3.06, 95% CI 2.73-4.43), volume depletion events (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.07-1.43) and amputation (RR 1.44 95% CI 1.13-1.83). There was a high likelihood of differences in the associations of the individual compounds with cardiovascular death, hypoglycaemia and amputation (all I-2 amp;gt; 80%) and a moderate likelihood of differences in the associations with non-fatal stroke, all-cause death, urinary tract infection and fracture (all I-2 amp;gt; 30%). Conclusion: There are strong overall associations of SGLT2 inhibition with protection against major cardiovascular events, heart failure, serious decline in kidney function and all-cause death. SGLT2 inhibitors were also associated with infections, volume depletion effects and amputation. Some associations appear to differ between compounds. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2018
Keywords
Diabetes type 2; SGLT2 inhibitors; Cardiovascular disease; Kidney disease; Safety; Amputation; Fracture; Systematic review; Randomised controlled trials
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149368 (URN)10.1016/j.diabres.2018.03.027 (DOI)000434107600014 ()29604389 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-02 Created: 2018-07-02 Last updated: 2019-05-01
Chow, C. K., Thiagalingam, A., Santo, K., Kok, C., Thakkar, J., Stepien, S., . . . Redfern, J. (2018). TEXT messages to improve MEDication adherence and Secondary prevention (TEXTMEDS) after acute coronary syndrome: a randomised clinical trial protocol. BMJ Open, 8(1), Article ID e019463.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>TEXT messages to improve MEDication adherence and Secondary prevention (TEXTMEDS) after acute coronary syndrome: a randomised clinical trial protocol
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2018 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e019463Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Identifying simple, low-cost and scalable means of supporting lifestyle change and medication adherence for patients following a cardiovascular (CV) event is important. Objective The TEXTMEDS (TEXT messages to improve MEDiGation adherence and Secondary prevention) study aims to investigate whether a cardiac education and support programme sent via mobile phone text message improves medication adherence and risk factor levels in patients following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Study design A single-blind, multicentre, randomised clinical trial of 1400 patients after an ACS with 12 months follow-up. The intervention group will receive multiple weekly text messages that provide information, motivation, support to adhere to medications, quit smoking (if relevant) and recommendations for healthy diet and exercise. The primary endpoint is the percentage of patients who are adherent to cardioprotective medications and the key secondary outcomes are mean systolic blood pressure (BP) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Secondary outcomes will also include total cholesterol, mean diastolic BP, the percentage of participants who are adherent to each cardioprotective medication class, the percentage of participants who achieve target levels of CV risk factors, major vascular events, hospital readmissions and all-cause mortality. The study will be augmented by formal economic and proGess evaluations to assess acceptability, utility and Gost-effectiveness. Summary The study will provide multicentre randomised trial evidence of the effects of a text message-based programme on cardioprotective medication adherence and levels of CV risk factors. Ethics and dissemination Primary ethics approval was received from Western Sydney Local Health District Human Research EthiGs Committee (HREC2012/12/4.1 (3648) AU RED HREC/13ANMEAD/15). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and presentations at international conferences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148155 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2017-019463 (DOI)000431743500040 ()29374674 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) [APP1042290]; National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia - Heart Foundation [APP1033478]; Sydney Medical School Foundation Chapman Fellowship; National Health and Medical Research Council [APP1061793]; National Heart Foundation [APP1061793, APP100484]; University of Sydney International Postgraduate Scholarship; University of Sydney Australian Postgraduate Award; NHMRC [1020430]; County Council of Ostergotland international fellowship; Swedish Medical Society

Available from: 2018-06-01 Created: 2018-06-01 Last updated: 2019-05-01
Rådholm, K., Festin, K., Falk, M., Midlöv, P., Mölstad, S. & Östgren, C. J. (2016). Blood pressure and all-cause mortality: a prospective study of nursing home residents. Age and Ageing, 45(6), 826-832
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blood pressure and all-cause mortality: a prospective study of nursing home residents
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2016 (English)In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 826-832Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To explore the natural course of blood pressure development and its relation to mortality in a nursing home cohort.

Methods: A cohort of 406 nursing home residents in south east Sweden was followed prospectively for 30 months. Participants were divided into four groups based on systolic blood pressure (SBP) at baseline. Data were analysed using a Cox regression model with all-cause mortality as the outcome measurement; paired Student t-tests were used to evaluate blood pressure development over time.

Results: During follow-up, 174 (43%) people died. Participants with SBP <120 mmHg had a hazard ratio for mortality of 1.56 (95% confidence interval, 1.08–2.27) compared with those with SBP 120–139 mmHg, adjusted for age and sex. Risk of malnutrition or present malnutrition was most common in participants with SBP <120 mmHg; risk of malnutrition or present malnutrition estimated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment was found in 78 (71%). The levels of SBP decreased over time independent of changes in anti-hypertensive medication.

Conclusions: In this cohort of nursing home residents, low SBP was associated with increased all-cause mortality. SBP decreased over time; this was not associated with altered anti-hypertensive treatment. The clinical implication from this study is that there is a need for systematic drug reviews in elderly persons in nursing homes, paying special attention to those with low SBP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
Keywords
older people, prospective study, nursing home, hypertension, hypotension, all-cause mortality
National Category
General Practice Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121283 (URN)10.1093/ageing/afw122 (DOI)000392702200018 ()
Note

Funding agencies| Health Research Council in south east Sweden (FORSS-8888, FORSS-11636 and FORSS-31811); the County of Östergötland (LIO-11877, LIO-31321 and LIO-79951); the Family Janne Elgqvist Foundation; King Gustaf V and Queen Victoria Freemason Foundation.

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Rådholm, K., Wiréhn, A.-B., Chalmers, J. & Östgren, C. J. (2016). Use of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction: a nationwide register study. Diabetic Medicine, 33(2), 218-223
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction: a nationwide register study
2016 (English)In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 218-223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

To explore the gender- and age-specific risk of developing a first myocardial infarction in people treated with antidiabetic and/or antidepressant drugs compared with people with no pharmaceutical treatment for diabetes or depression.

Methods

A cohort of all Swedish residents aged 45–84 years (n = 4 083 719) was followed for a period of 3 years. Data were derived from three nationwide registers. The prescription and dispensing of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs were used as markers of disease. All study subjects were reallocated according to treatment and the treatment categories were updated every year. Data were analysed using a Cox regression model with a time-dependent variable. The outcome of interest was first fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction.

Results

During follow-up, 42 840 people had a first myocardial infarction, 3511 of which were fatal. Women aged 45–64 years, receiving both antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs had a hazard ratio for myocardial infarction of 7.4 (95% CI 6.3–8.6) compared with women receiving neither. The corresponding hazard ratio for men was 3.1 (95% CI 2.8–3.6).

Conclusions

The combined use of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction compared with use of either group of drugs alone. The increase in relative risk was greater in middle-aged women than in middle-aged men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Other Health Sciences General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121285 (URN)10.1111/dme.12822 (DOI)000370161800011 ()26036276 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: King Gustaf V and Queen Victoria Freemason Foundation

Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Rådholm, K. (2015). Cardiovascular risk factors in elderly: With special emphasis on atrial fibrillation, hypertension and diabetes. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular risk factors in elderly: With special emphasis on atrial fibrillation, hypertension and diabetes
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background

The part of the population that belongs to the oldest-old (ages 80 years or older) increases rapidly, worldwide. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disease burden globally. Multimorbidity is common in old age and stroke, diabetes mellitus (DM) and atrial fibrillation (AF) are strongly associated with age. Cardiovascular risk factors are well studied and documented in younger and middle ages, but not as well in old and frail individuals. Therefore, preventive treatment choices are mostly based on evidence for younger patients. The aim of this thesis was to explore age and other aspects of cardiovascular risk factors; AF, hypertension and DM, in relation to comorbidity, cardiovascular outcome and mortality.

Methods

This thesis was based on four different studies:

  • The ELSA85 study of 85 years old in Linköping, Sweden
  • The international, multicentre, randomised controlled INTERACT2 trial of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage (ICH), mean age 64 years.
  • The prospective SHADES study of nursing home residents, mean age 85 years.
  • The prospective, national SWE-diadep study of dispensed antidiabetics, antidepressantsand prevalent myocardial infarction (MI) in 45-84 years old.

Data was obtained from questionnaires (ELSA85, INTERACT2), medical records and medical examination (ELSA85, INTERACT2, SHADES), and national registers (SWE-Diadep).

Results

The ELSA85 study showed that 16% (n=53) had an ECG showing AF. There was an increased hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality in participants with AF at baseline, at 90 years of age (HR 1.59, 95% [Confidence Interval] CI 1.04-2.44) adjusted for sex. This increase in HR did not persist when adjusted for congestive heart failure (CHF). In the INTERACT2 study, increasing age was associated with increasing frequency of death or dependency (odds ratio [OR] 4.36, 95% [CI] 3.12-6.08 for >75 years vs <52 years, p value for trend <0.001). The SHADES study showed that participants with Systolic blood pressure (SBP) <120 mmHg had an increased HR for mortality (1.56, 95% CI, 1.08–2.27; p=0.019) but there were no differences between SBP groups 140–159 mmHg and ≥160 mmHg compared with the reference group SBP 120–139 mmHg. SBP decreased during the prospective study period. In the SWE-diadep study, individuals with antidiabetics and antidepressants combined had a greater HR for MI compared to the reference of no antidiabetics or antidepressants, mostly so in women aged 45-64 years (HR 7.4, 95% CI: 6.3-8.6).

Conclusion

Risk factors for CVDs in elderly differ from cardiovascular risk factors in middle aged individuals an

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. p. 78
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1466
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Other Health Sciences General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121286 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-121286 (DOI)978-91-7519-030-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-10-09, Belladonna, ingång 78, Campus US, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-09-11 Created: 2015-09-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Rådholm, K., Arima, H., Lindley, R. I., Wang, J., Tzourio, C., Robinson, T., . . . Chalmers, J. (2015). Older age is a strong predictor for poor outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage: the INTERACT2 study. Age and Ageing, 44(3), 422-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older age is a strong predictor for poor outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage: the INTERACT2 study
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2015 (English)In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 422-427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:: Global ageing contributes greatly to the burden of stroke. We investigated the influence of age on the baseline profile and on outcomes in acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) among participants of the INTERACT2 study.

METHODS:: INTERACT2 was an international, randomised controlled trial in 2839 patients with spontaneous ICH within 6 h of onset and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP; 150-220 mmHg) who were allocated to receive intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg within 1 h) or guideline-recommended (target SBP <180 mmHg) blood pressure lowering treatment. Stroke severity was assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Poor outcome was defined as death or major disability ('dependency', modified Rankin Scale scores 3-6) at 90 days. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed with the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire. Associations between age and outcomes were analysed in multivariable logistic regression models.

RESULTS:: Stroke severity increased in categories of older age (P-trend 0.002). Stroke patients over 75 years old were four times more likely to die or be disabled at 90 days than those <52 years when other confounders were accounted for (odds ratio 4.36, 95% confidence interval 3.12-6.08). Older age was also associated with decreasing HRQoL, across mobility, self-care, usual activities and depression (all P-trend <0.001), and pain or discomfort (P-trend 0.022).

CONCLUSION:: In the INTERACT2 cohort, older people had more severe ICH and worse outcomes (death, major disability and HRQoL). These data will help guide clinicians manage older people with haemorrhagic stroke. Clinical Trial Registration: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00716079).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2015
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115371 (URN)10.1093/ageing/afu198 (DOI)000355623100014 ()25497513 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Rådholm, K., Wiréhn, A.-B., Falk, M., Marcusson, J. & Östgren, C. J. (2013). Myocardial infarction in subjects using anti-diabetic and/or anti-depressant agents compared tonon-users: a nationwide register study in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at EASD Barcelona 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Myocardial infarction in subjects using anti-diabetic and/or anti-depressant agents compared tonon-users: a nationwide register study in Sweden
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115912 (URN)
Conference
EASD Barcelona 2013
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Rådholm, K., Östgren, C. J., Alehagen, U., Falk, M., Wressle, E., Marcusson, J. & Nägga, K. (2011). Atrial fibrillation (AF) and co-morbidity in elderly. A population based survey of 85 years old subjects.. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 52(3), e170-e175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atrial fibrillation (AF) and co-morbidity in elderly. A population based survey of 85 years old subjects.
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2011 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 52, no 3, p. e170-e175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The occurrence of AF increases sharply with age. The aim of this study was to explore and compare prevalent co-morbidity and self-estimated health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in subjects with AF versus subjects with sinus rhythm or pacemaker in 85 years old subjects. We analyzed data from a population of 336 eighty-five years old subjects participating in the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment (ELSA-85) study. Medical history was obtained from postal questionnaire, medical records and during medical examination that included a physical examination, cognitive tests, non-fasting venous blood samples and electrocardiographic (ECG) examination. 19% had an ECG showing AF. There were very few significant differences regarding medical history, self-estimated quality of life (QoL), laboratory- and examination findings and use of public health care between the AF group and the non-AF group. The study showed that the population of 85 years old subjects with AF was surprisingly healthy in terms of prevalent co-existing medical conditions, healthcare contacts and overall HRQoL. We conclude that elderly patients with AF do not in general have increased co-morbidity than subjects without AF.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
Keywords
Atrial fibrillation; Co-morbidities of elderly; CHADS2 score; Oral anticoagulation; Health-related quality of life
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67143 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2010.10.024 (DOI)000288989400015 ()
Note

Original Publication: Karin Rådholm, Carl Johan Östgren, Urban Alehagen, Magnus Falk, Eva Wressle, Jan Marcusson and Katarina Nägga, Atrial fibrillation (AF) and co-morbidity in elderly. A population based survey of 85 years old subjects., 2011, Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), (52), 3, e170-e175. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2010.10.024 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. http://www.elsevier.com/

Available from: 2011-03-31 Created: 2011-03-31 Last updated: 2019-06-27
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