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Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
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Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Stenfelt, S., Lunner, T., Ng, E., Lidestam, B., Zekveld, A., Sörqvist, P., . . . Rönnberg, J. (2016). Auditory, signal processing, and cognitive factors  influencing  speech  perception  in  persons with hearing loss fitted with hearing aids – the N200 study. In: : . Paper presented at IHCON2016, International Hearing Aid Research Conference, Tahoe City, California, USA, August 10–14, 2016. , Article ID B46.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auditory, signal processing, and cognitive factors  influencing  speech  perception  in  persons with hearing loss fitted with hearing aids – the N200 study
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the current study was to assess aided speech-in-noise outcomes and relate those measures to auditory sensitivity and processing, different types of cognitive processing abilities, and signal processing in hearing aids.

Material and method: Participants were 200 hearing-aid wearers, with a mean age of 60.8 years, 43% females, with average hearing thresholds in the better ear of 37.4 dB HL. Tests of auditory functions were hearing thresholds, DPOAEs, tests of fine structure processing, IHC dead regions, spectro-temporal modulation, and speech recognition in quiet (PB words). Tests of cognitive processing function were tests of phonological skills, working memory, executive functions and inference making abilities, and general cognitive tests (e.g., tests of cognitive decline and IQ). The outcome test variables were the Hagerman sentences with 50 and 80% speech recognition levels, using two different noises (stationary speech weighted noise and 4-talker babble), and three types of signal processing (linear gain, fast acting compression, and linear gain plus a non-ideal binary mask). Another sentence test included typical and atypical sentences with contextual cues that were tested both audio-visually and in an auditory mode only. Moreover, HINT and SSQ were administrated.

Analysis: Factor analyses were performed separate for the auditory, cognitive, and outcome tests.

Results: The auditory tests resulted in two factors labeled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE, the cognitive tests in one factor (COGNITION), and the outcome tests in the two factors termed NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT that relates to the level of context in the different outcome tests. When age was partialled out, COGNITION was moderately correlated with the TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and NO CONTEXT factors but only weakly correlated with the CONTEXT factor. SENSITIVITY correlated weakly with TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and CONTEXT, and moderately with NO CONTEXT, while TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE showed weak correlation with CONTEXT and moderate correlation with NO CONTEXT. CONTEXT and NO CONTEXT had a  moderate correlation. Moreover, the overall results of the Hagerman sentences showed 0.9 dB worse SNR with fast acting compression compared with linear gain and 5.5 dB better SNR with linear  gain and noise reduction compared with only linear gain.

Conclusions: For hearing aid wearers, the ability to recognize speech in noise is associated with both sensory and cognitive processing abilities when the speech materials have low internal context. These associations are less prominent when the speech material has contextual cues.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159504 (URN)
Conference
IHCON2016, International Hearing Aid Research Conference, Tahoe City, California, USA, August 10–14, 2016
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Pichora-Fuller, K., Dupuis, K. & Smith, S. L. (2016). EFFECTS OF VOCAL EMOTION ON MEMORY IN YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULTS. Experimental Aging Research, 42(1), 18-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EFFECTS OF VOCAL EMOTION ON MEMORY IN YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULTS
2016 (English)In: Experimental Aging Research, ISSN 0361-073X, E-ISSN 1096-4657, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 18-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Study Context: Emotional content can enhance memory for visual stimuli, and older adults often perform better if stimuli portray positive emotion. Vocal emotion can enhance the accuracy of word repetition in noise when vocal prosody portrays attention-capturing emotions such as fear and pleasant surprise. In the present study, the authors examined the effect of vocal emotion on the accuracy of repetition and recall in younger and older adults when words are presented in quiet or in a background of competing babble.Methods: Younger and older adults (M-age = 20 and 72years, respectively) participated. Lists of 100 items (carrier phrase plus target word) were presented in recall sets of increasing size. Word repetition accuracy was tested after each item and recall after each trial in each set size. In Experiment 1, one list spoken in a neutral voice and another with emotion (fear, pleasant surprise, sad, neutral) were presented in quiet (n = 24 per group). In Experiment 2, participants (n = 12 per group) were presented the emotional list in noise.Results: In quiet, word repetition accuracy was near perfect for both groups and did not vary systematically with set size for the list spoken in a neutral voice; however, for the emotional list, repetition was less accurate, especially for the older group. Recall in quiet was higher for younger than older adults; collapsed over groups, recall was higher for the neutral than for the emotional list and it decreased with increasing set size. In noise, emotion-specific effects emerged; word repetition for the older group and word recall for both groups (more for younger than older) was best for fear or pleasant surprise and worst for sad.Conclusion: In quiet, vocal emotion reduced the word repetition accuracy of the older group and recall accuracy for both groups. In noise, there were emotion-specific effects on the repetition accuracy of older adults and the recall accuracy of both groups. Both groups, but especially the younger group, performed better for items portraying fear or pleasant surprise and worse for items portraying sadness or neutral emotion. The emotion-specific effects on word repetition cascade to recall, especially in older listeners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC, 2016
National Category
Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124103 (URN)10.1080/0361073X.2016.1108734 (DOI)000366810500003 ()26683039 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Smith, S. L. & Pichora-Fuller, K. (2015). Associations between speech understanding and auditory and visual tests of verbal working memory: effects of linguistic complexity, task, age, and hearing loss. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(1394)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between speech understanding and auditory and visual tests of verbal working memory: effects of linguistic complexity, task, age, and hearing loss
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, no 1394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Listeners with hearing loss commonly report having difficulty understanding speech, particularly in noisy environments. Their difficulties could be due to auditory and cognitive processing problems. Performance on speech-in-noise tests has been correlated with reading working memory span (RWMS), a measure often chosen to avoid the effects of hearing loss. If the goal is to assess the cognitive consequences of listeners auditory processing abilities, however, then listening working memory span (LWMS) could be a more informative measure. Some studies have examined the effects of different degrees and types of masking on working memory, but less is known about the demands placed on working memory depending on the linguistic complexity of the target speech or the task used to measure speech understanding in listeners with hearing loss. Compared to RWMS, LWMS measures using different speech targets and maskers may provide a more ecologically valid approach. To examine the contributions of RWMS and LWMS to speech understanding, we administered two working memory measures (a traditional RWMS measure and a new LWMS measure), and a battery of tests varying in the linguistic complexity of the speech materials, the presence of babble masking, and the task. Participants were a group of younger listeners with normal hearing and two groups of older listeners with hearing loss (n = 24 per group). There was a significant group difference and a wider range in performance on LWMS than on RWMS. There was a significant correlation between both working memory measures only for the oldest listeners with hearing loss. Notably, there were only few significant correlations among the working memory and speech understanding measures. These findings suggest that working memory measures reflect individual differences that are distinct from those tapped by these measures of speech understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2015
Keywords
hearing loss; speech understanding; aging; reading working memory; listening working memory; speech-in-noise
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121893 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01394 (DOI)000361561900001 ()26441769 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Rehabilitation Research and Development (RRandD) Service, Washington D.C.; RRandD Auditory Vestibular Research Enhancement Award Program (REAP) [C4339F]

Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-12 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Pichora-Fuller, K. M. (2015). Cognitive Decline and Hearing Health Care for Older Adults. American Journal of Audiology, 24(2), 108-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive Decline and Hearing Health Care for Older Adults
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to consider the implications of age-related cognitive decline for hearing health care. Method: Recent research and current thinking about age-related declines in cognition and the links between auditory and cognitive aging are reviewed briefly. Implications of this research for improving prevention, assessment, and intervention in audiologic practice and for enhancing interprofessional teamwork are highlighted. Conclusions: Given the important connection between auditory and cognitive aging and given the high prevalence of both hearing and cognitive impairments in the oldest older adults, health care services could be improved by taking into account how both the ear and the brain change over the life span. By incorporating cognitive factors into audiologic prevention, assessment, and intervention, hearing health care can contribute to better hearing and communication as well as to healthy aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2015
Keywords
Cognitive aging, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, age-related hearing loss, audiologic rehabilitation
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120658 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0076 (DOI)000358354700010 ()25856721 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Pichora-Fuller, K. M. (2015). Forum on the Brain and Hearing Aids. American Journal of Audiology, 24(2), 112-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forum on the Brain and Hearing Aids
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 112-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to introduce and provide an overview of the 3 articles presented in the invited forum "The Brain and Hearing Aids." Method: The main ideas of the articles presented by the 3 panelists are identified, and a commentary is provided to synthesize the ideas. Conclusions: Benefits from hearing aids and auditory training entail higher-level cortical and cognitive processing involved in categorizing and remembering sound. New approaches to predicting, designing, and evaluating technological and behavioral interventions will need to consider the brain and not just the ears of listeners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2015
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120659 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0067 (DOI)000358354700011 ()25863869 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Besser, J., Festen, J. M., Theo Goverts, S., Kramer, S. E. & Pichora-Fuller, K. (2015). Speech-in-Speech Listening on the LiSN-S Test by Older Adults With Good Audiograms Depends on Cognition and Hearing Acuity at High Frequencies. Ear and Hearing, 36(1), 24-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Speech-in-Speech Listening on the LiSN-S Test by Older Adults With Good Audiograms Depends on Cognition and Hearing Acuity at High Frequencies
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2015 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 24-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The main objective was to investigate age-related differences on the listening in spatialized noise-sentences (LiSN-S) test in adults with normal audiometric thresholds in most of the speech range. A second objective was to examine the contributions of auditory, cognitive, and linguistic abilities to LiSN-S outcomes. Design: The LiSN-S test was administered to participants in an older group (M-Age = 72.0, SD = 4.3 years) and a younger group (M-Age = 21.7, SD = 2.6 years) with N = 26 per group. All the participants had clinically normal audiometric thresholds at frequencies up to and including 3000 Hz. The LiSN-S test yields a speech reception threshold (SRT) in each of the four speech-in-speech listening conditions that differ in the availability of voice difference cues and/or spatial separation cues. Based on these four SRTs, the scores were calculated for the talker advantage, the spatial advantage, and the total advantage as a result of both the types of cues. Additionally, the participants completed four auditory temporal-processing tests, a cognitive screening test, a vocabulary test, and tests of linguistic closure for high-and low-context sentences. The contributions of these predictor variables and measures of pure-tone hearing acuity to LiSN-S outcomes were analyzed for both the groups using regression analyses. Results: Younger listeners outperformed the older listeners on all four LiSN-S SRTs and all the three LiSN-S advantage measures. Age-related differences were larger for conditions involving the use of spatial cues. For the younger group, all LiSN-S SRTs were predicted by the measure of linguistic closure in low-context sentences; in addition, the SRT for the condition with voice difference cues but without spatial separation cues was predicted by vocabulary, and the SRT for the condition with both voice difference cues and spatial separation cues was predicted by temporal resolution at low frequencies. Vocabulary also contributed to the talker advantage in the younger group, whereas the spatial advantage was predicted by high-frequency pure-tone hearing acuity in the range 6,000 to 10,000 Hz (pure-tone average [ PTA] HIGH). For the older group, the LiSN-S SRT in the condition with neither voice difference cues nor spatial separation cues was predicted by age; their other three LiSN-S SRTs and all advantage measures were predicted by PTA HIGH. In addition, for the older group, cognition predicted LiSN-S SRT outcomes in three of the four conditions. Measures of auditory temporal processing, linguistic abilities, or hearing acuity up to and including 4000 Hz did not predict LiSN-S outcomes in this group. Conclusions: LiSN-S outcomes were poorer for adults aged 65 years or older, even those with good audiograms, compared with younger adults and also compared with people up to the age of 60 years from a previous study. In the present study, regardless of the types of cues, auditory and cognitive interactions were reflected by the combined influences on LiSN-S outcomes of high-frequency hearing acuity and measures of linguistic and cognitive processing. The data also suggest a hierarchy in the deployment of processing resources, which would account for the observed shift from linguistic abilities in the younger group to general cognitive abilities in the older group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 2015
Keywords
Age; Auditory temporal processing; Cognitive abilities; LiSN-S; Spatial segregation; Speech-in-speech listening; Voice segregation
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113724 (URN)000346911200004 ()25207850 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Foundation Het Heinsius Houbolt Fonds; EMGO+ Institute of Health and Care Research

DOI does not work: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000096.

Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved
Singh, G., Pichora-Fuller, K., Malkowski, M., Boretzki, M. & Launer, S. (2014). A survey of the attitudes of practitioners toward teleaudiology. International Journal of Audiology, 53(12), 850-860
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A survey of the attitudes of practitioners toward teleaudiology
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 12, p. 850-860Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To survey hearing healthcare practitioners (1) attitudes toward teleaudiology appointments, (2) willingness to conduct different clinical tasks via teleaudiology, and (3) willingness to conduct a teleaudiology appointment with different patient populations. Design: All participants were asked to complete the Attitudes toward Teleaudiology Scale for Practitioners (ATS-P), a 46-item online survey designed for this study. Study sample: The responses from 202 hearing healthcare practitioners working in Canada were collected. The sample consisted of 152 audiologists, 49 hearing instrument specialists, and one who did not specify a category. Results: The majority of respondents indicated that teleaudiology is likely to have a minimal effect on the quality of hearing healthcare in audiology and the quality of client-practitioner interactions, although many respondents indicated that teleaudiology would have a positive effect on accessibility to service. Nevertheless, a small minority of respondents indicated that teleaudiology would have a negative impact on quality of care in audiology. Conclusions: Willingness to use teleaudiology depended on a combination of the clinical tasks to be performed and the patient populations to be served. These findings can help guide the successful implementation of teleaudiology services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Attitudes; teleaudiology; telemedicine; survey
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113002 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.921736 (DOI)000345208900002 ()25017424 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|MITACS Elevate Industrial Postdoctoral Fellowship; Sonova Holding AG

Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Rönnberg, J., Lunner, T., Zekveld, A., Sörqvist, P., Danielsson, H., Lyxell, B., . . . Rudner, M. (2013). On the development of a working memory model for Ease-of Language Understanding (ELU). In: : . Paper presented at Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping University, Sweden, June 16-19, 2013 (pp. 58).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the development of a working memory model for Ease-of Language Understanding (ELU)
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Working memory is important for online language processing in a dialogue. We use it to store relevant information, to inhibit or ignore irrelevant information, and to attend to conversation selectively. Working memory helps us keep track of a dialogue while taking turns and following the gist. This paper examines the Ease-of Language Understanding model (i.e., the ELU model, Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008) in light of new behavioral and neural findings concerning the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in sound and speech processing. The new ELU model is a meaning prediction system that depends on phonological and semantic interactions in rapid implicit and slower explicit processing mechanisms that both depend on working memory, albeit in different ways. New predictions and clinical implications are outlined.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103051 (URN)
Conference
Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping University, Sweden, June 16-19, 2013
Available from: 2014-01-12 Created: 2014-01-12 Last updated: 2019-06-27
Singh, G., Pichora-Fuller, K. M., Hayes, D., von Schroeder, H. P. & Carnahan, H. (2013). The Aging Hand and the Ergonomics of Hearing Aid Controls. Ear and Hearing, 34(1), E1-E13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Aging Hand and the Ergonomics of Hearing Aid Controls
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2013 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 34, no 1, p. E1-E13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The authors investigated the effects of hand function and aging on the ability to manipulate different hearing instrument controls. Over the past quarter century, hearing aids and hearing aid controls have become increasingly miniaturized. It is important to investigate the aging hand and hearing aid ergonomics because most hearing aid wearers are adults aged 65 years and above, who may have difficulty handling these devices. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: In Experiment 1, the effect of age on the ability to manipulate two different open-fit behind-the-ear style hearing aids was investigated by comparing the performance of 20 younger (18-25 years of age), 20 young-old (60-70 years of age), and 20 older adults (71-80 years of age). In Experiment 2, ability to manipulate 11 different hearing instrument controls was investigated in 28 older adults who self-reported having arthritis in their hand, wrist, or finger and 28 older adults who did not report arthritis. For both experiments, the relationship between performance on the measures of ability to manipulate the devices and performance on a battery of tests to assess hand function was investigated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: In Experiment 1, age-related differences in performance were observed in all the tasks assessing hand function and in the tasks assessing ability to manipulate a hearing aid. In Experiment 2, although minimal differences were observed between the two groups, significant differences were observed depending on the type of hearing instrument control. Performance on several of the objective tests of hand function was associated with the ability to manipulate hearing instruments. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The overall pattern of findings suggest that haptic (touch) sensitivity in the fingertips and manual dexterity, as well as disability, pain, and joint stiffness of the hand, all contribute to the successful operation of a hearing instrument. However, although aging is associated with declining hand function and co-occurring declines in ability to manipulate a hearing instrument, for the sample of individuals in this study, including those who self-reported having arthritis, only minimal declines were observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87457 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0b013e31825f9bba (DOI)000312639800001 ()22971815 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Unitron Hearing Ltd.||

Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Rönnberg, J., Lunner, T., Zekveld, A., Sörqvist, P., Danielsson, H., Lyxell, B., . . . Rudner, M. (2013). The Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model: theoretical, empirical, and clinical advances. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 7(31)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model: theoretical, empirical, and clinical advances
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2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5137, E-ISSN 1662-5137, Vol. 7, no 31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Working memory is important for online language processing during conversation. We use it to maintain relevant information, to inhibit or ignore irrelevant information, and to attend to conversation selectively. Working memory helps us to keep track of and actively participate in conversation, including taking turns and following the gist. This paper examines the Ease of Language Understanding model (i.e., the ELU model, Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008) in light of new behavioral and neural findings concerning the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in uni-modal and bimodal language processing. The new ELU model is a meaning prediction system that depends on phonological and semantic interactions in rapid implicit and slower explicit processing mechanisms that both depend on WMC albeit in different ways. It is based on findings that address the relationship between WMC and (a) early attention processes in listening to speech, (b) signal processing in hearing aids and its effects on short-term memory, (c) inhibition of speech maskers and its effect on episodic long-term memory, (d) the effects of hearing impairment on episodic and semantic long-term memory, and finally, (e) listening effort. New predictions and clinical implications are outlined. Comparisons with other WMC and speech perception models are made.

Keywords: working memory capacity, speech in noise, attention, long-term memory, hearing loss, brain imaging analysis, oscillations, language understanding

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Research Foundation, 2013
Keywords
working memory capacity, speech in noise, attention, long-term memory, hearing loss, brain imaging analysis, oscillations, language understanding
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100532 (URN)10.3389/fnsys.2013.00031 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-11-20 Created: 2013-11-08 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
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