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Lindström, Stefan BORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1503-8293
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Lindström, S. B., Uhlin, F., Bjarnegård, N., Gylling, M., Nilsson, K., Svensson, C., . . . Länne, T. (2018). Computer-Aided Evaluation of Blood Vessel Geometry From Acoustic Images. Journal of ultrasound in medicine, 37(4), 1025-1031
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer-Aided Evaluation of Blood Vessel Geometry From Acoustic Images
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2018 (English)In: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 1025-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A method for computer-aided assessment of blood vessel geometries based on shape-fitting algorithms from metric vision was evaluated. Acoustic images of cross sections of the radial artery and cephalic vein were acquired, and medical practitioners used a computer application to measure the wall thickness and nominal diameter of these blood vessels with a caliper method and the shape-fitting method. The methods performed equally well for wall thickness measurements. The shape-fitting method was preferable for measuring the diameter, since it reduced systematic errors by up to 63% in the case of the cephalic vein because of its eccentricity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
blood vessel wall, computer-aided assessment, informatics/image processing, lumen diameter, peripheral vascular, shape fitting
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144016 (URN)10.1002/jum.14439 (DOI)000428445900024 ()29027696 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Alimadadi, M., Lindström, S. B. & Kulachenko, A. (2018). Role of microstructures in the compression response of three-dimensional foam-formed wood fiber networks. Soft Matter, 14, 8945-8955
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of microstructures in the compression response of three-dimensional foam-formed wood fiber networks
2018 (English)In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 14, p. 8945-8955Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-porosity, three-dimensional wood fiber networks made by foam forming present experimentally accessible instances of hierarchically structured, athermal fiber networks. We investigate the large deformation compression behavior of these networks using fiber-resolved finite element analyses to elucidate the role of microstructures in the mechanical response to compression. Three-dimensional network structures are acquired using micro-computed tomography and subsequent skeletonization into a Euclidean graph representation. By using a fitting procedure to the geometrical graph data, weare able to identify nine independent statistical parameters needed for the regeneration of artificial networks with the observed statistics. The compression response of these artificially generated networks and the physical network is then investigated using implicit finite element analysis. A direct comparison of the simulation results from the reconstructed and artificial network reveals remarkable differences already in the elastic region. These can neither be fully explained by density scaling, the size effect nor the boundary conditions. The only factor which provides the consistent explanation of the observed difference is the density and fiber orientation nonuniformities; these contribute to strain-localization so that the network becomes more compliant than expected for statistically uniform microstructures. We also demonstrate that the experimentally manifested strain-stiffening of such networks is due to development of new inter-fiber contacts during compression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2018
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152731 (URN)10.1039/c7sm02561k (DOI)000450442300008 ()30398491 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056540966 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Gibaud, T., Perge, C., Lindström, S. B., Taberlet, N. & Manneville, S. (2016). Multiple yielding processes in a colloidal gel under large amplitude oscillatory stress. Soft Matter, 12(6), 1701-1712
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple yielding processes in a colloidal gel under large amplitude oscillatory stress
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2016 (English)In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1701-1712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fatigue refers to the changes in material properties caused by repeatedly applied loads. It has been widely studied for, e.g., construction materials, but much less has been done on soft materials. Here, we characterize the fatigue dynamics of a colloidal gel. Fatigue is induced by large amplitude oscillatory stress (LAOStress), and the local displacements of the gel are measured through high-frequency ultrasonic imaging. We show that fatigue eventually leads to rupture and fluidization. We evidence four successive steps associated with these dynamics: (i) the gel first remains solid, (ii) it then slides against the walls, (iii) the bulk of the sample becomes heterogeneous and displays solid-fluid coexistence, and (iv) it is finally fully fluidized. It is possible to homogeneously scale the duration of each step with respect to the stress oscillation amplitude sigma_0. The data are compatible with both exponential and power-law scalings with sigma_0, which hints at two possible interpretations of delayed yielding in terms of activated processes or of the Basquin law. Surprisingly, we find that the model parameters behave nonmonotonically as we change the oscillation frequency and/or the gel concentration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2016
National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125069 (URN)10.1039/c5sm02587g (DOI)000369750400007 ()26685970 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:  European Research Council under the European Unions Seventh Framework Program (FP7)/ERC grant [258803]; Institut Universitaire de France; Agence Nationale de la Recherche [ANR-11-PDOC-027]; Bernt Jarmark Foundation

Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Lindström, S. B. & Thore, C.-J. (2015). 10000 mechanics problems at the press of a button. In: Proceedings of Svenska Mekanikdagar: . Paper presented at Svenska Mekanikdagar 2015 Linköping 10-12 juni (pp. 84). Linköping University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>10000 mechanics problems at the press of a button
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of Svenska Mekanikdagar, Linköping University, 2015, p. 84-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Problem solving is at the heart of the mechanics curriculum, and developing problem solving skills is an important learning objective in basic and advanced mechanics courses at the undergraduate level. In alignment with this tradition, written examinations are mainly designed to test problem solving capabilities. Despite the fact that students spend most of their mechanics studies solving mechanics problems, an alarming fraction of them fail the written examination. One possible explanation is that a problem solving infrastructure, e.g. answers to problems and opportunities for collaboration with fellow students, is provided during the study period of courses, but missing during the examination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University: , 2015
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122173 (URN)
Conference
Svenska Mekanikdagar 2015 Linköping 10-12 juni
Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2015-10-29Bibliographically approved
Lindström, S., Satha, G. & Klarbring, A. (2015). Extension of Murray's law including nonlinear mechanics of a composite artery wall. Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, 14(1), 83-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extension of Murray's law including nonlinear mechanics of a composite artery wall
2015 (English)In: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, ISSN 1617-7959, E-ISSN 1617-7940, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A goal function approach is used to derive an extension of Murray’s law that includes effects of nonlinear mechanics of the artery wall. The artery is modeled as a thin-walled tube composed of different species of nonlinear elastic materials that deform together. These materials grow and remodel in a process that is governed by a target state defined by a homeostatic radius and a homeostatic material composition. Following Murray’s original idea, this target state is defined by a principle of minimum work. We take this work to include that of pumping and maintaining blood, as well as maintaining the materials of the artery wall. The minimization is performed under a constraint imposed by mechanical equilibrium. We derive a condition for the existence of a cost-optimal homeostatic state. We also conduct parametric studies using this novel theoretical frame to investigate how the cost-optimal radius and composition of the artery wall depend on flow rate, blood pressure, and elastin content.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015
Keywords
Goal function, Murrays law, Constrained mixture theory, Artery
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113721 (URN)10.1007/s10237-014-0590-8 (DOI)000347250500008 ()24817182 (PubMedID)
Note

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [621-2012-3117]

Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Perge, C., Lindström, S. B., Taberlet, N., Gibaud, T. & Manneville, S. (2015). Large amplitude oscillatory stress and fatigue in colloidal gels. In: Proceedings of 10th Annual European Rheology Conference: . Paper presented at 10th Annual European Rheology Conference, Nantes, France.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Large amplitude oscillatory stress and fatigue in colloidal gels
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2015 (English)In: Proceedings of 10th Annual European Rheology Conference, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122174 (URN)
Conference
10th Annual European Rheology Conference, Nantes, France
Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2015-10-29
Olin, P., Lindström, S. & Wagberg, L. (2015). Trapping of Water Drops by Line-Shaped Defects on Superhydrophobic Surfaces. Langmuir, 31(23), 6367-6374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trapping of Water Drops by Line-Shaped Defects on Superhydrophobic Surfaces
2015 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 31, no 23, p. 6367-6374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have investigated the effect of line-shaped topographical defects on the motion of water drops across superhydrophobic wax surfaces using a high-speed video camera. The defects are introduced onto the superhydrophobic wax surfaces by a scratching procedure. It is demonstrated that the motion of a drop interacting with the defect can be approximated by a damped harmonic oscillator. Whether a drop passes or gets trapped by the defect is determined by the incident speed and the properties of the oscillator, specifically by the damping ratio and a nondimensional forcing constant representing the effects of gravity and pinning forces. We also show that it is possible to predict a critical trapping speed as well as an exit speed in systems with negligible viscous dissipation using a simple work energy consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2015
National Category
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120230 (URN)10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b01174 (DOI)000356755300012 ()26010934 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF) [2005:0073/13, RMA08-0044]

Available from: 2015-07-21 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Satha, G., Lindström, S. B. & Klarbring, A. (2014). A goal function approach to remodeling of arteries uncovers mechanisms for growth instability. Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, 13(6), 1243-1259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A goal function approach to remodeling of arteries uncovers mechanisms for growth instability
2014 (English)In: Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, ISSN 1617-7959, E-ISSN 1617-7940, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1243-1259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A novel, goal function-based formulation for the growth dynamics of arteries is introduced, and used for investigating the development of growth instability in blood vessels. Such instabilities would lead to abnormal growth of the vessel, reminiscent of an aneurysm. The blood vessel  is modeled as a thin-walled cylindrical tube and the constituents that form the vessel wall are assumed to deform together as a constrained mixture. The growth dynamics of the composite material of the vessel wall is described by an evolution equation, where the effective area of each constituent changes in the direction of steepest descent of a goal function. This goal function is formulated in such way that the constituents grow toward a target potential energy and a target composition. The convergence of the simulated response of the evolution equation toward a target homeostatic state is investigated for a range of isotropic and orthotropic material models. These simulations suggest that elastin-deficient vessels are more prone to growth instability. Increased stiffness of the vessel wall, on the other hand, gives a more stable growth process. Another important finding is that an increased rate of degradation of materials impairs growth stability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Goal function, Constrained mixture theory, Stability, Growth and remodeling, Blood vessel, Artery
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104186 (URN)10.1007/s10237-014-0569-5 (DOI)000343210900007 ()
Available from: 2014-02-10 Created: 2014-02-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Carrick, C., Lindström, S., Larsson, P. T. & Wågberg, L. (2014). Lightweight, highly compressible, noncrystalline cellulose capsules. Langmuir, 30(26), 7635-7644
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lightweight, highly compressible, noncrystalline cellulose capsules
2014 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 30, no 26, p. 7635-7644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We demonstrate how to prepare extraordinarily deformable, gas-filled, spherical capsules from nonmodified cellulose. These capsules have a low nominal density, ranging from 7.6 to 14.2 kg/m(3), and can be deformed elastically to 70% deformation at 50% relative humidity. No compressive strain-at-break could be detected for these dry cellulose capsules, since they did not rupture even when compressed into a disk with pockets of highly compressed air. A quantitative constitutive model for the large deformation compression of these capsules is derived, including their high-frequency mechanical response and their low-frequency force relaxation, where the latter is governed by the gas barrier properties of the dry capsule. Mechanical testing corroborated these models with good accuracy. Force relaxation measurements at a constant compression rendered an estimate for the gas permeability of air through the capsule wall, calculated to 0.4 mL mu m/m(2) days kPa at 50% relative humidity. These properties taken together open up a large application area for the capsules, and they could most likely be used for applications in compressible, lightweight materials and also constitute excellent model materials for adsorption and adhesion studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2014
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109222 (URN)10.1021/la501118b (DOI)000338806500003 ()24870000 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lindström, S. B., Johansson, L. & Karlsson, N. R. (2014). Metastable states and activated dynamics in thin-film adhesion to patterned surfaces. Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, 89, 062401-1-062401-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metastable states and activated dynamics in thin-film adhesion to patterned surfaces
2014 (English)In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 89, p. 062401-1-062401-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We consider adhesion due to London–van der Waals attraction between a thin film and a patterned surface with nanometer asperities. Depending on the surface topography and the stiffness of the film, three regimes of adhesion are identified: complete contact adhesion, partial contact adhesion, and glassy adhesion. For complete contact adhesion, the film conforms to the undulations of the surface, whereas for partial contact and glassy adhesion, the adhesive interface breaks down into microscopic areas of contact. When a film in the glassy regime is peeled off the surface, metastable states develop at which the crack front becomes arrested, analogously to the frustrated motion of the three-phase contact line across a heterogeneous surface. For this glassy regime, we use transition state theory to model the thermally activated progression of the crack front. This theoretical treatment suggests that the rate of the adhesive failure increases exponentially with the applied force.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Physical Society, 2014
National Category
Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110756 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevE.89.062401 (DOI)000346849600002 ()
Available from: 2014-09-21 Created: 2014-09-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1503-8293

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