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Weinstein, Jami, Associate Professor
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Weinstein, J. & Colebrook, C. (2017). Critical Life Studies and the Problems of Inhuman Rites and Posthumous Life (1ed.). In: Jami Weinstein and Claire Cloebrook (Ed.), Posthumous Life: Theorizing Beyond the Posthuman (pp. 1-14). New York: Columbia University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical Life Studies and the Problems of Inhuman Rites and Posthumous Life
2017 (English)In: Posthumous Life: Theorizing Beyond the Posthuman / [ed] Jami Weinstein and Claire Cloebrook, New York: Columbia University Press, 2017, 1, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Columbia University Press, 2017 Edition: 1
Series
Critical Life Studies
Keywords
Life, Extinction, Posthuman, Critical Life Studies, New Materialism
National Category
Other Humanities Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Philosophy History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151849 (URN)10.7312/wein17214 (DOI)9780231172158 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Weinstein, J. & Colebrook, C. (Eds.). (2017). Posthumous Life: Theorizing Beyond the Posthuman (1ed.). New York: Columbia University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posthumous Life: Theorizing Beyond the Posthuman
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Posthumous Life launches critical life studies: a mode of inquiry that neither endorses nor dismisses a wave of recent "turns" toward life, matter, vitality, inhumanity, animality, and the real. Questioning the nature and limits of life in the natural sciences, the essays in this volume examine the boundaries and significance of the human and the humanities in the wake of various redefinitions of what counts as life. They explore the possibility of theorizing life without assuming it to be either a simple substrate or an always-mediated effect of culture and difference. Posthumous Lifeprovides new ways of thinking about animals, plants, humans, difference, sexuality, race, gender, identity, the earth, and the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Columbia University Press, 2017. p. 392 Edition: 1
Series
Critical Life Studies ; 2
Keywords
Life, Extinction, Critical LIfe Studies, Anthropocene, Posthuman, Inhuman, New Materialism
National Category
Philosophy History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100881 (URN)10.7312/wein17214 (DOI)9780231172158 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-11-14 Created: 2013-11-14 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Colebrook, C. & Weinstein, J. (2017). Preface: Postscript on the Posthuman (1ed.). In: Jami Weinstein and Claire Colebrook (Ed.), Posthumous Life: Theorizing Beyond the Posthuman (pp. ix-xxix). New York: Columbia University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preface: Postscript on the Posthuman
2017 (English)In: Posthumous Life: Theorizing Beyond the Posthuman / [ed] Jami Weinstein and Claire Colebrook, New York: Columbia University Press, 2017, 1, p. ix-xxixChapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Columbia University Press, 2017 Edition: 1
Series
Critical Life Studies
Keywords
Life, extinction, posthuman, critical life studies
National Category
Other Humanities Philosophy History of Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151848 (URN)10.7312/wein17214 (DOI)9780231172158 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Weinstein, J. (2016). Vital Ethics: On Life and In/difference. In: Alastair Hunt and Stephanie Youngblood (Ed.), Against Life: . Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vital Ethics: On Life and In/difference
2016 (English)In: Against Life / [ed] Alastair Hunt and Stephanie Youngblood, Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2016
Keywords
Life, In/difference ethics, life itself, new materialism, posthumous, posthuman
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100884 (URN)9780810132122 (ISBN)9780810132139 (ISBN)9780810132146 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-11-14 Created: 2013-11-14 Last updated: 2017-05-14
Weinstein, J. & Colebrook, C. (2015). Anthropocene Feminism: Rethinking the Unthinkable. philoSOPHIA - A Journal of Continental Feminism, Special Issue "Anthropocene Feminisms", 5(2), 167-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anthropocene Feminism: Rethinking the Unthinkable
2015 (English)In: philoSOPHIA - A Journal of Continental Feminism, Special Issue "Anthropocene Feminisms", ISSN 2155-0891, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 167-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In her recent lecture on the Anthropocene (to which she adds the Capitalocene and the Chthulucene), Donna Haraway expresses some alarm that after two major insights into what counts as thinkable, it was “anthropos” that became the term for the post-Holocene (Haraway 2014). Haraway declares, with emphasis, that it is “literally unthinkable” to work with the individual unit of “man” if one is to do good intellectual work. For Haraway, the two knowledge events that ought to have precluded the use of the figure of the “anthropos” are: first, the acceptance that any seeming individual is the outcome of a series of complex relations and must be studied as such (so there would be no epoch with anything, let alone “man,” as its first cause), and, second, intellectual inquiry has acknowledged a general becoming-with, such that in order to be anything at all, “one” must be in a dynamic relation. Haraway’s work is exemplary of post-liberal feminist resistance to the figure of man—as subject, agent, and center of knowing. Terms like “Woman” or “the feminine” do not extend the field occupied by man; they instead create a different intensity. So when Haraway questions the “anthropos” of the Anthropocene she neither asks that women, too, be included in those who have scarred the planet, nor does she claim that “Woman” would occupy some innocent outside. Instead, she proposes that one think of the “anthropos” as untimely, as out of sync with an intellectual milieu that theorizes the death of the subject and the eclipse of the human, and has even begun to renounce the notion of life in itself. It is odd that in the face of this destruction of any possibility of thinking by [End Page 167] way of individualism, the epic gesture of the present deploys the figure of the “anthropos,” as it should be unthinkable today to return to the figure of man

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SUNY Press, 2015
Keywords
Anthropocene, Feminism, Philosophy of Geology
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Gender Studies Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121237 (URN)
Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2016-07-04
Hayward, E. & Weinstein, J. (2015). Introduction: Tranimalities in the Age of Trans* Life. Transgender Studies Quarterly Journal, 2(2), 195-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Tranimalities in the Age of Trans* Life
2015 (English)In: Transgender Studies Quarterly Journal, ISSN 2328-9252, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 195-208Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This introduction puts into conversation two seemingly divergent analytics: transgender studies and animal studies. It asks: How does the prefixial nature of trans—across, into, and through: a prepositional force—further transfigure the “animal turn”? If the animal turn has recharged inquiry into difference and ethics, what happens to these magnetic pulls when they are transformed, transacted, or transduced by trans studies? Taking as a central logic that transgender subjects have never been fully human—consider how the indeterminate pronoun “it” has been used to name transgenders—the introduction posits how a trans heuristic allows us to better understand the limits of “the human” as a biopolitical tool for privileging a few so as to de-, in-, nonhumanize the many. Trans exposes what is at stake in these prefixial maneuvers, what is materialized and dematerialized, what is made livable and unlivable, killable and un-killable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Duke University Press, 2015
Keywords
trans; animal; biopolitics; humanism; difference; ethics
National Category
Gender Studies Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121244 (URN)10.1215/23289252-2867446 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-09-10 Created: 2015-09-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Weinstein, J. & Colebrook, C. (Eds.). (2015). philoSOPHIA - A Journal of Continental Feminism, Special Issue "Anthropocene Feminisms" (5(2)ed.). SUNY Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>philoSOPHIA - A Journal of Continental Feminism, Special Issue "Anthropocene Feminisms"
2015 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SUNY Press, 2015. p. 320 Edition: 5(2)
Series
philoSOPHIA - A Journal of Continental Feminism, ISSN 2155-0891, E-ISSN 2155-0905 ; Volume 5, Issue 2
Keywords
Anthropocene, Feminism, Philosophy of geology
National Category
Philosophy Gender Studies Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121236 (URN)
Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
Muñoz, J. E., Haritaworn, J., Hird, M., Jackson, Z. I., Puar, J. K., Joy, E., . . . Halberstam, J. (2015). Theorizing Queer Inhumanisms. GLQ - A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 21(2-3), 209-248
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theorizing Queer Inhumanisms
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2015 (English)In: GLQ - A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, ISSN 1064-2684, E-ISSN 1527-9375, Vol. 21, no 2-3, p. 209-248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Duke University Press, 2015
Keywords
Queer, poshumous, posthuman, life
National Category
Philosophy Other Humanities Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121233 (URN)10.1215/10642684-2843323 (DOI)000354752900002 ()
Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2017-05-05Bibliographically approved
Weinstein, J. & Hayward, E. (Eds.). (2015). 'TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, Special Issue "Tranimalities" (2(2)ed.). Duke University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, Special Issue "Tranimalities"
2015 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Duke University Press, 2015. p. 177 Edition: 2(2)
Series
TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly Journal, ISSN 2328-9252 ; Volume 2, Issue 2
National Category
Gender Studies Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121235 (URN)
Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Weinstein, J. (2013). The Prospect of a Posthumous In/difference Ethics. In: : . Paper presented at "Mattering: Feminism, Science & Materialism," City University of New York, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Prospect of a Posthumous In/difference Ethics
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
In/difference ethics, posthumous, post human, critical life studies, new materialism
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100882 (URN)
Conference
"Mattering: Feminism, Science & Materialism," City University of New York, USA
Available from: 2013-11-14 Created: 2013-11-14 Last updated: 2015-09-09
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