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Rudner, Mary
Publications (10 of 267) Show all publications
Holmer, E., Heimann, M. & Rudner, M. (2017). Computerized Sign Language-Based Literacy Trainingfor Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 22(4), 404-421.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computerized Sign Language-Based Literacy Trainingfor Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children
2017 (English)In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, E-ISSN 1465-7325, Vol. 22, no 4, 404-421 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Strengthening the connections between sign language and written language may improve reading skills in deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) signing children. The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether computerized sign language-based literacy training improves reading skills in DHH signing children who are learning to read. Further, longitudinal associations between sign language skills and developing reading skills were investigated. Participants were recruited from Swedish state special schools for DHH children, where pupils are taught in both sign language and spoken language. Reading skills were assessed at five occasions and the intervention was implemented in a cross-over design. Results indicated that reading skills improved over time and that development of word reading was predicted by the ability to imitate unfamiliar lexical signs, but there was only weak evidence that it was supported by the intervention. These results demonstrate for the first time a longitudinal link between sign-based abilities and word reading in DHH signing children who are learning to read. We suggest that the active construction of novel lexical forms may be a supramodal mechanism underlying word reading development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017
National Category
Language Technology (Computational Linguistics) Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141161 (URN)10.1093/deafed/enx023 (DOI)000412206300006 ()28961874 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2008-0846]; Swedish Hearing Foundation [B2015/480]

Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Rudner, M., Keidser, G., Hygge, S. & Rönnberg, J. (2016). Better visuospatial working memory in adults who report profound deafness compared to those with normal or poor hearing: data from the UK Biobank resource. Ear and Hearing, 37(5), 620-622.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Better visuospatial working memory in adults who report profound deafness compared to those with normal or poor hearing: data from the UK Biobank resource
2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 5, 620-622 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experimental work has shown better visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in profoundly deaf individuals compared to those with normal hearing. Other data, including the UK Biobank resource shows poorer VSWM in individuals with poorer hearing. Using the same database, the authors investigated VSWM in individuals who reported profound deafness. Included in this study were 112 participants who were profoundly deaf, 1310 with poor hearing and 74,635 with normal hearing. All participants performed a card-pair matching task as a test of VSWM. Although variance in VSWM performance was large among profoundly deaf participants, at group level it was superior to that of participants with both normal and poor hearing. VSWM in adults is related to hearing status but the association is not linear. Future study should investigate the mechanism behind enhanced VSWM in profoundly deaf adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126479 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000314 (DOI)000395797700020 ()27232076 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Rudner, M. (2016). Cognitive spare capacity as an index of listening effort. Ear and Hearing, 37, 69S-76S.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive spare capacity as an index of listening effort
2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, 69S-76S p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126016 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000302 (DOI)000379372100008 ()
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Cardin, V., Smittenaar, R. C., Orfanidou, E., Rönnberg, J., Capek, C. M., Rudner, M. & Woll, B. (2016). Differential activity in Heschl's gyrus between deaf and hearing individuals is due to auditory deprivation rather than language modality. NeuroImage, 124, 96-106.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differential activity in Heschl's gyrus between deaf and hearing individuals is due to auditory deprivation rather than language modality
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2016 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 124, 96-106 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sensory cortices undergo crossmodal reorganisation as a consequence of sensory deprivation. Congenital deafness in humans represents a particular case with respect to other types of sensory deprivation, because cortical reorganisation is not only a consequence of auditory deprivation, but also of language-driven mechanisms. Visual crossmodal plasticity has been found in secondary auditory cortices of deaf individuals, but it is still unclear if reorganisation also takes place in primary auditory areas, and how this relates to language modality and auditory deprivation.

Here, we dissociated the effects of language modality and auditory deprivation on crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus as a whole, and in cytoarchitectonic region Te1.0 (likely to contain the core auditory cortex). Using fMRI, we measured the BOLD response to viewing sign language in congenitally or early deaf individuals with and without sign language knowledge, and in hearing controls.

Results show that differences between hearing and deaf individuals are due to a reduction in activation caused by visual stimulation in the hearing group, which is more significant in Te1.0 than in Heschl's gyrus as a whole. Furthermore, differences between deaf and hearing groups are due to auditory deprivation, and there is no evidence that the modality of language used by deaf individuals contributes to crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus.

Keyword
Heschl's gyrus, Deafness, Sign language, Speech, fMRI
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123221 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.08.073 (DOI)000366646700011 ()26348556 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Riksbankens Jubileumsfond [P2008-0481:1-E]; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2008-0846]; Swedish Research Council [349-2007-8654]; Economic and Social Research Council of Great Britain [RES-620-28-6001, RES-620-28-0002]

Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Rudner, M. & Holmer, E. (2016). Editorial Material: Working Memory in Deaf Children Is Explained by the Developmental Ease of Language Understanding (D-ELU) Model in FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, vol 7, issue 1047, pp. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(1047).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial Material: Working Memory in Deaf Children Is Explained by the Developmental Ease of Language Understanding (D-ELU) Model in FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, vol 7, issue 1047, pp
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, no 1047Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2016
Keyword
deaf; sign language; working memory; language experience; vocabulary; cognition; imitation; representation
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130386 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01047 (DOI)000379193900001 ()27456112 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2008-0846]

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Rudner, M. & Signoret, C. (2016). Editorial: The Role of Working Memory and Executive Function in Communication under Adverse Conditions. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(148).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: The Role of Working Memory and Executive Function in Communication under Adverse Conditions
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, no 148Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2016
Keyword
cognition; communication; adverse conditions; hearing; deafness
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125806 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00148 (DOI)000369870600001 ()26903938 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council

Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Holmer, E., Heimann, M. & Rudner, M. (2016). Evidence of an association between sign language phonological awareness and word reading in deaf and hard-of-hearing children. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 48, 145-159.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence of an association between sign language phonological awareness and word reading in deaf and hard-of-hearing children
2016 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 48, 145-159 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Children with good phonological awareness (PA) are often good word readers. Here, we asked whether Swedish deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children who are more aware of the phonology of Swedish Sign Language, a language with no orthography, are better at reading words in Swedish.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

We developed the Cross-modal Phonological Awareness Test (C-PhAT) that can be used to assess PA in both Swedish Sign Language (C-PhAT-SSL) and Swedish (C-PhAT-Swed), and investigated how C-PhAT performance was related to word reading as well as linguistic and cognitive skills. We validated C-PhAT-Swed and administered C-PhAT-Swed and C-PhAT-SSL to DHH children who attended Swedish deaf schools with a bilingual curriculum and were at an early stage of reading.

OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

C-PhAT-SSL correlated significantly with word reading for DHH children. They performed poorly on C-PhAT-Swed and their scores did not correlate significantly either with C-PhAT-SSL or word reading, although they did correlate significantly with cognitive measures.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

These results provide preliminary evidence that DHH children with good sign language PA are better at reading words and show that measures of spoken language PA in DHH children may be confounded by individual differences in cognitive skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keyword
Deafness; Handshape; Phonological awareness; Sign language; Word reading
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122930 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2015.10.008 (DOI)000367766100014 ()26561215 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2008-0846
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2008-0846]

Available from: 2015-11-30 Created: 2015-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Pichora-Fuller, K. M., Kramer, S. E., Eckert, M. A., Edwards, B., Hornsby, B. W. Y., Humes, L. E., . . . Wingfield, A. (2016). Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy: The Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL). Ear and Hearing, 37, 5S-27S.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy: The Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL)
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, 5S-27S p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Fifth Eriksholm Workshop on "Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy" was convened to develop a consensus among interdisciplinary experts about what is known on the topic, gaps in knowledge, the use of terminology, priorities for future research, and implications for practice. The general term cognitive energy was chosen to facilitate the broadest possible discussion of the topic. It goes back to Titchener (1908) who described the effects of attention on perception; he used the term psychic energy for the notion that limited mental resources can be flexibly allocated among perceptual and mental activities. The workshop focused on three main areas: (1) theories, models, concepts, definitions, and frameworks; (2) methods and measures; and (3) knowledge translation. We defined effort as the deliberate allocation of mental resources to overcome obstacles in goal pursuit when carrying out a task, with listening effort applying more specifically when tasks involve listening. We adapted Kahnemans seminal (1973) Capacity Model of Attention to listening and proposed a heuristically useful Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL). Our FUEL incorporates the well-known relationship between cognitive demand and the supply of cognitive capacity that is the foundation of cognitive theories of attention. Our FUEL also incorporates a motivation dimension based on complementary theories of motivational intensity, adaptive gain control, and optimal performance, fatigue, and pleasure. Using a three-dimensional illustration, we highlight how listening effort depends not only on hearing difficulties and task demands but also on the listeners motivation to expend mental effort in the challenging situations of everyday life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2016
Keyword
Attention; Autonomic nervous system; Cognitive capacity; Cognitive energy; Effortful listening; Executive function; Fatigue; Listening effort; Hearing impairment; Motivation; Neuroeconomics; Stress; Working memory
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130391 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000312 (DOI)000379372100002 ()27355771 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Oticon Foundation

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Holmer, E., Heimann, M. & Rudner, M. (2016). Imitation, Sign Language Skill and the Developmental Ease of Language Understanding (D-ELU) Model. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(107).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imitation, Sign Language Skill and the Developmental Ease of Language Understanding (D-ELU) Model
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, no 107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Imitation and language processing are closely connected. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model (Ronnberg et al., 2013) pre-existing mental representation of lexical items facilitates language understanding. Thus, imitation of manual gestures is likely to be enhanced by experience of sign language. We tested this by eliciting imitation of manual gestures from deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) signing and hearing non-signing children at a similar level of language and cognitive development. We predicted that the DHH signing children would be better at imitating gestures lexicalized in their own sign language (Swedish Sign Language, SSL) than unfamiliar British Sign Language (BSL) signs, and that both groups would be better at imitating lexical signs (SSL and BSL) than non-signs. We also predicted that the hearing non-signing children would perform worse than DHH signing children with all types of gestures the first time (T1) we elicited imitation, but that the performance gap between groups would be reduced when imitation was elicited a second time (T2). Finally, we predicted that imitation performance on both occasions would be associated with linguistic skills, especially in the manual modality. A split-plot repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated that DHH signers imitated manual gestures with greater precision than non-signing children when imitation was elicited the second but not the first time. Manual gestures were easier to imitate for both groups when they were lexicalized than when they were not; but there was no difference in performance between familiar and unfamiliar gestures. For both groups, language skills at T1 predicted imitation at T2. Specifically, for DHH children, word reading skills, comprehension and phonological awareness of sign language predicted imitation at T2. For the hearing participants, language comprehension predicted imitation at T2, even after the effects of working memory capacity and motor skills were taken into account. These results demonstrate that experience of sign language enhances the ability to imitate manual gestures once representations have been established, and suggest that the inherent motor patterns of lexical manual gestures are better suited for representation than those of non-signs. This set of findings prompts a developmental version of the ELU model, D-ELU.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2016
Keyword
imitation; sign language; manual gesture; representation; development
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125800 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00107 (DOI)000370127400001 ()26909050 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2008-0846]

Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Rudner, M. (2016). Listening effort: Ears and Brains. Invited Featured Session.. In: : . Paper presented at XXXIII World Congress of Audiology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. September 18 - 21, 2016.. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Listening effort: Ears and Brains. Invited Featured Session.
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126037 (URN)
Conference
XXXIII World Congress of Audiology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. September 18 - 21, 2016.
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10
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