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Laplante-Levesque, ArianeORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4170-2426
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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Ratanjee-Vanmali, H., Swanepoel, D. W. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2019). Characteristics, behaviours and readiness of persons seeking hearing healthcare online. International Journal of Audiology, 58(2), 107-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics, behaviours and readiness of persons seeking hearing healthcare online
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study describes characteristics, behaviours and readiness of people who are interested in seeking hearing healthcare (HHC) online.

Design: A non-profit clinic was established from which services through a virtual clinic are offered. Most of the patient–audiologist interactions are conducted online. We used online means to invite individuals to take a free online digit-in-noise (DIN) test. Upon failing the test, individuals reported their readiness to seek HHC by using two tools: the line and the staging algorithm.

Study sample: Individuals ≥18 years of age, within the greater Durban area, South Africa, were eligible to participate in the study.

Results: A total of 462 individuals completed the online DIN test during the first 3 months. Of those, 58.66% (271/462) failed the test and 11.04% (51/462) submitted their details for further contact from the clinic audiologist. Five individuals proceeded to a comprehensive hearing evaluation and hearing aid trial: all those individuals showed readiness to seek further HHC on the measurement tools. These individuals have reported knowing of their hearing challenges prior to taking the test and have waited for a period of between 5 and 16 years before seeking HHC. A significant association between age and DIN test result was found.

Conclusion: This explorative study is the first clinic to utilise digital tools across the entire patient journey in combination with face-to-face interactions in providing HHC. Internet-connected devices provide an opportunity for individuals to seek HHC and for providers to offer initial services to detect, counsel and support persons through the initial engagement process of seeking HHC. This may open up new audiology patient pathways through online hearing screening, assessment of readiness to seek further HHC and enhancement of service delivery using hybrid services by combining online and face-to-face modes of synchronous and asynchronous communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Online hearing healthcare; South Africa; digit-in-noise test; eHealth; hearing screening; hearing status; mHealth; patient information; patient pathways; teleaudiology
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156047 (URN)10.1080/14992027.2018.1516895 (DOI)000461680400005 ()30289050 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054500321 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Saunders, G. H., Frederick, M. T., Silverman, S. C., Nielsen, C. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2016). Description of Adults Seeking Hearing Help for the First Time According to Two Health Behavior Change Approaches: Transtheoretical Model (Stages of Change) and Health Belief Model. Ear and Hearing, 37(3), 324-333
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Description of Adults Seeking Hearing Help for the First Time According to Two Health Behavior Change Approaches: Transtheoretical Model (Stages of Change) and Health Belief Model
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 324-333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Several models of health behavior change are commonly used in health psychology. This study applied the constructs delineated by two models-the transtheoretical model (in which readiness for health behavior change can be described with the stages of precontemplation, contemplation and action) and the health belief model (in which susceptibility, severity, benefits, barriers, self-efficacy, and cues to action are thought to determine likelihood of health behavior change)-to adults seeking hearing help for the first time. Design: One hundred eighty-two participants (mean age: 69.5 years) were recruited following an initial hearing assessment by an audiologist. Participants mean four-frequency pure-tone average was 35.4 dB HL, with 25.8% having no hearing impairment, 50.5% having a slight impairment, and 23.1% having a moderate or severe impairment using the World Health Organization definition of hearing loss. Participants hearing-related attitudes and beliefs toward hearing health behaviors were examined using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) and the health beliefs questionnaire (HBQ), which assess the constructs of the transtheoretical model and the health belief model, respectively. Participants also provided demographic information, and completed the hearing handicap inventory (HHI) to assess participation restrictions, and the psychosocial impact of hearing loss (PIHL) to assess the extent to which hearing impacts competence, self-esteem, and adaptability. Results: Degree of hearing impairment was associated with participation restrictions, perceived competence, self-esteem and adaptability, and attitudes and beliefs measured by the URICA and the HBQ. As degree of impairment increased, participation restrictions measured by the HHI, and impacts of hearing loss, as measured by the PIHL, increased. The majority of first-time help seekers in this study were in the action stage of change. Furthermore, relative to individuals with less hearing impairment, individuals with more hearing impairment were at more advanced stages of change as measured by the URICA (i.e., higher contemplation and action scores relative to their precontemplation score), and they perceived fewer barriers and more susceptibility, severity, benefits and cues to action as measured by the HBQ. Multiple regression analyses showed participation restrictions (HHI scores) to be a highly significant predictor of stages of change explaining 30% to 37% of the variance, as were duration of hearing difficulty, and perceived benefits, severity, self-efficacy and cues to action assessed by the HBQ. Conclusions: The main predictors of stages of change in first-time help seekers were reported participation restrictions and duration of hearing difficulty, with constructs from the health belief model also explaining some of the variance in stages of change scores. The transtheoretical model and the health belief model are valuable for understanding hearing health behaviors and can be applied when developing interventions to promote help seeking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2016
Keywords
Health behavior; Health care seeking behavior; Motivation; Patient acceptance of health care; Rehabilitation of hearing impaired
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128734 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000268 (DOI)000375151900016 ()26765286 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Oticon Foundation; VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence [C9230C]

Available from: 2016-06-01 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Ingo, E., Brännström, K. J., Andersson, G., Lunner, T. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2016). Measuring motivation using the transtheoretical (stages of change) model: A follow-up study of people who failed an online hearing screening.. International Journal of Audiology, 55(Suppl 3), S52-S58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring motivation using the transtheoretical (stages of change) model: A follow-up study of people who failed an online hearing screening.
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no Suppl 3, p. S52-S58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Acceptance and readiness to seek professional help have shown to be important factors for favourable audiological rehabilitation outcomes. Theories from health psychology such as the transtheoretical (stages-of-change) model could help understand behavioural change in people with hearing impairment. In recent studies, the University of Rhode Island change assessment (URICA) has been found to have good predictive validity.

DESIGN: In a previous study, 224 Swedish adults who had failed an online hearing screening completed URICA and two other measures of stages of change. This follow-up aimed to: (1) determine prevalence of help-seeking at a hearing clinic and hearing aid uptake, and (2) explore the predictive validity of the stages of change measures by a follow-up on the 224 participants who had failed a hearing screening 18 months previously.

STUDY SAMPLE: A total of 122 people (54%) completed the follow-up online questionnaire, including the three measures and questions regarding experience with hearing help-seeking and hearing aid uptake.

RESULTS: Since failing the online hearing screening, 61% of participants had sought help. A good predictive validity for a one-item measure of stages of change was reported.

CONCLUSIONS: The Staging algorithm was the stages of change measure with the best ability to predict help-seeking 18 months later.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130826 (URN)10.1080/14992027.2016.1182650 (DOI)000381035200007 ()27206679 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2009-0055]

Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Brännström, J., Öberg, M., Ingo, E., Månsson, K. N., Andersson, G., Lunner, T. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2016). The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients. Internet Interventions, 4(1), 82-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients
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2016 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126519 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2016.01.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Weineland, S., Andersson, G., Lunner, T., Carlbring, P., Hesser, H., Ingo, E., . . . Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2015). Bridging the Gap Between Hearing Screening and Successful Rehabilitation: Research Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational Interviewing via Internet. American Journal of Audiology, 24(3), 302-306
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging the Gap Between Hearing Screening and Successful Rehabilitation: Research Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational Interviewing via Internet
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Studies point to low help-seeking after a failed hearing screening. This research forum article presents the research protocol for a randomized controlled trial of motivational interviewing via the Internet to promote help-seeking in people who have failed an online hearing screening. Method: Adults who fail a Swedish online hearing screening, including a speech-in-noise recognition test, will be randomized to either an intervention group (participating in motivational interviewing) or an active control group (reading a book on history of hearing aids). Both of the conditions will be delivered via the Internet. The primary outcome is experience with seeking health care and using hearing aids 9 months after the intervention. Secondary outcomes are changes in before and after measures of self-reported hearing difficulties, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Stages of change and self-efficacy in hearing help-seeking are measured immediately after intervention and at a 9-month follow-up for the purpose of mediation analysis. Results: The results of this randomized controlled trial may help bridge the gap between hearing screening and successful hearing rehabilitation. Conclusion: Although no large instantaneous benefits are expected, a slow change toward healthy behaviors-seeking health care and using hearing aids-would shed light on how to use the Internet to assist people with hearing impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC, 2015
National Category
Applied Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123081 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0012 (DOI)000364315200009 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Council for Wealth, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Grenness, C., Hickson, L., Laplante-Lévesque, A., Meyer, C. & Davidson, B. (2015). Communication Patterns in Audiologic Rehabilitation History-Taking: Audiologists, Patients, and Their Companions. Ear and Hearing, 36(2), 191-204
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication Patterns in Audiologic Rehabilitation History-Taking: Audiologists, Patients, and Their Companions
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2015 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 191-204Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The nature of communication between patient and practitioner influences patient outcomes. Specifically, the history-taking phase of a consultation plays a role in the development of a relationship and in the success of subsequent shared decision making. There is limited research investigating patient-centered communication in audiology, and this study may be the first to investigate verbal communication in an adult audiologic rehabilitation context. This research aimed, first, to describe the nature of verbal communication involving audiologists, patients, and companions in the history-taking phase of initial audiology consultations and, second, to determine factors associated with communication dynamics. Design: Sixty-three initial audiology consultations involving patients over the age of 55, their companions when present, and audiologists were audio-video recorded. Consultations were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System and divided into three consultation phases: history, examination, and counseling. This study analyzed only the history-taking phase in terms of opening structure, communication profiles of each speaker, and communication dynamics. Associations between communication dynamics (verbal dominance, content balance, and communication control) and 11 variables were evaluated using Linear Mixed Model methods. Results: The mean length of the history-taking phase was 8.8 min (range 1.7 to 22.6). A companion was present in 27% of consultations. Results were grouped into three areas of communication: opening structure, information exchange, and relationship building. Examination of the history opening structure revealed audiologists tendency to control the agenda by initiating consultations with a closed-ended question 62% of the time, followed by interruption of patient talk after 21.3 sec, on average. The aforementioned behaviors were associated with increased verbal dominance throughout the history and increased control over the content of questions. For the remainder of the history, audiologists asked 97% of the questions and did so primarily in closed-ended form. This resulted in the audiologist talking as much as the patient and much more than the companions when they were present. Questions asked by the audiologist were balanced in topic: biomedical and psychosocial/lifestyle; however, few emotionally focused utterances were observed from any speaker (less than 5% of utter ances). Conclusions: Analysis of verbal communication involving audiologists, patients, and companions in the history-taking phase in 63 initial audiology consultations revealed a communicative exchange that was audiologist-controlled and structured, but covered both medical and lifestyle content. Audiologists often attempted to create a relationship with their patients; however, little emotional relationship building occurred, which may have implications later in the consultation when management decisions are being made. These results are not in line with patient-centered communication principles. Further research and changes to clinical practice are warranted to transform patient-centered communication from an ideal to a reality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 2015
Keywords
Adult; Communication; Counseling; Hearing aids; Hearing impairment; Patient-centered care; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116508 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000100 (DOI)000350254700010 ()25285960 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|HEARing CRC under the Cooperative Research Centers Program, an initiative of the Australian Government

Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Andersson, G., Lunner, T., Laplante-Lévesque, A. & Preminger, J. E. (2015). Internet and Audiology: A Review of the First International Meeting. American Journal of Audiology, 24(3), 269-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet and Audiology: A Review of the First International Meeting
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 269-270Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this research forum article is to describe the impetus for holding the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology (October 2014) and to introduce the special research forum that arose from the meeting. Method: The rationale for the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology is described. This is followed by a short description of the research sections and articles appearing in the special issue. Six articles consider the process of health care delivery over the Internet; this includes health care specific to hearing, tinnitus, and balance. Four articles discuss the development of effective Internet-based treatment programs. Six articles describe and evaluate Internet-based interventions specific to adult hearing aid users. Conclusion: The fledgling field of Internet and audiology is remarkably broad. The Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology ocurred in September 2015.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123076 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0033 (DOI)000364315200001 ()
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Preminger, J. E., Oxenboll, M., Barnett, M. B., Jensen, L. D. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2015). Perceptions of adults with hearing impairment regarding the promotion of trust in hearing healthcare service delivery. International Journal of Audiology, 54(1), 20-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of adults with hearing impairment regarding the promotion of trust in hearing healthcare service delivery
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This paper describes how trust is promoted in adults with hearing impairment within the context of hearing healthcare (HHC) service delivery. Design: Data were analysed from a previously published descriptive qualitative study that explored perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation. Study sample: Interview transcripts from 29 adults from four countries with different levels of hearing impairment and different experience with the HHC system were analysed thematically. Results: Patients enter into the HHC system with service expectations resulting in a preconceived level of trust that can vary from low to high. Relational competence, technical competence, commercialized approach, and clinical environment (relevant to both the clinician and the clinic) influence a patients resulting level of trust. Conclusions: Trust is evolving rather than static in HHC: Both clinicians and clinics can promote trust. The characteristics of HHC that engender trust are: practicing good communication, supporting shared decision making, displaying technical competence, offering comprehensive hearing rehabilitation, promoting self-management, avoiding a focus on hearing-aid sales, and offering a professional clinic setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Trust; hearing healthcare; clinician patient relationship
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113489 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.939776 (DOI)000346468200003 ()25262671 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-19 Created: 2015-01-19 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Laplante-Lévesque, A. & Sundewall Thoren, E. (2015). Readability of Internet Information on Hearing: Systematic Literature Review. American Journal of Audiology, 24(3), 284-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Readability of Internet Information on Hearing: Systematic Literature Review
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 284-288Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This systematic literature review asks the following question: "What is the readability of Internet information on hearing that people with hearing impairment and their significant others can access in the context of their hearing care?" Method: Searches were completed in three databases: CINAHL, PubMed, and Scopus. Seventy-eight records were identified and systematically screened for eligibility: 8 records were included that contained data on the readability of Internet information on hearing that people with hearing impairment and their significant others can access in the context of their hearing care. Results: Records reported mean readability levels from 9 to over 14. In other words, people with hearing impairment and their significant others need 9 to 14 years of education to read and understand Internet information on hearing that they access in the context of their hearing care. Conclusion: The poor readability of Internet information on hearing has been well documented; it is time to focus on valid and sustainable initiatives that address this problem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123079 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0091 (DOI)000364315200005 ()
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Laplante-Lévesque, A., Brannstrom, J. K., Ingo, E., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2015). Stages of Change in Adults Who Have Failed an Online Hearing Screening. Ear and Hearing, 36(1), 92-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stages of Change in Adults Who Have Failed an Online Hearing Screening
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2015 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 92-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Hearing screening has been proposed to promote help-seeking and rehabilitation in adults with hearing impairment. However, some longitudinal studies point to low help-seeking and subsequent rehabilitation after a failed hearing screening (positive screening result). Some barriers to help-seeking and rehabilitation could be intrinsic to the profiles and needs of people who have failed a hearing screening. Theories of health behavior change could help to understand this population. One of these theories is the transtheoretical (stages-of-change) model of health behavior change, which describes profiles and needs of people facing behavior changes such as seeking help and taking up rehabilitation. According to this model, people go through distinct stages toward health behavior change: precontemplation, contemplation, action, and finally, maintenance. The present study describes the psychometric properties (construct validity) of the stages of change in adults who have failed an online hearing screening. Stages of change were measured with the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA). Principal component analysis is presented, along with cluster analysis. Internal consistency was investigated. Finally, relationships between URICA scores and speech-in-noise recognition threshold, self-reported hearing disability, and self-reported duration of hearing disability are presented. Design: In total, 224 adults who had failed a Swedish online hearing screening test (measure of speech-in-noise recognition) completed further questionnaires online, including the URICA. Results: A principal component analysis identified the stages of precontemplation, contemplation, and action, plus an additional stage, termed preparation (between contemplation and action). According to the URICA, half (50%) of the participants were in the preparation stage of change. The contemplation stage was represented by 38% of participants, while 9% were in the precontemplation stage. Finally, the action stage was represented by approximately 3% of the participants. Cluster analysis identified four stages-of-change clusters: they were named decision making (44% of sample), participation (28% of sample), indecision (16% of sample), and reluctance (12% of sample). The construct validity of the model was good. Participants who reported a more advanced stage of change had significantly greater self-reported hearing disability. However, participants who reported a more advanced stage of change did not have a significantly worse speech-in-noise recognition threshold or reported a significantly longer duration of hearing impairment. Conclusions: The additional stage this study uncovered, and which other studies have also uncovered, preparation, highlights the need for adequate guidance for adults who are yet to seek help for their hearing. The fact that very few people were in the action stage (approximately 3% of the sample) signals that screening alone is unlikely to be enough to improve help-seeking and rehabilitation rates. As expected, people in the later stages of change reported significantly greater hearing disability. The lack of significant relationships between stages-of-change measures and speech-in-noise recognition threshold and self-reported duration of hearing disability highlights the complex interplay between impairment, disability, and behaviors in adults who have failed an online hearing screening and who are yet to seek help.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 2015
Keywords
Hearing screening in adults; Stages of change; Transtheoretical model of health behavior change
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113726 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000085 (DOI)000346911200010 ()25158981 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2019-06-28
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4170-2426

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