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Silfvernagel, Kristin
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Dear, B., Silfvernagel, K. & Fogliati, V. (2016). Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) for older adults with anxiety and depression. In: Lindefors, N. & Andersson, G. (Ed.), Guided internet-based treatments in psychiatry: (pp. 219-234). Cham: Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) for older adults with anxiety and depression
2016 (English)In: Guided internet-based treatments in psychiatry / [ed] Lindefors, N. & Andersson, G., Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2016, p. 219-234Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Anxiety and depression are prevalent among older adults and are associated increased disability, reduced quality of life and poorer physical health. Effective psychological treatments such as cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) are known to be effective and acceptable for older adults. However, as with younger adults, research indicates relatively few older adults access these treatments in their traditional face-to-face format. However, highlighting the potential of newer internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) approaches for increasing access to treatment, a large proportion of older adults are online and the overall proportion online is only likely to grow over time. Several clinical trials have now been conducted examining ICBT for older adults and the nature and finding of these emerging studies are reviewed in this chapter. Future directions for research focused in this area are also discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2016
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142106 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-06083-5_12 (DOI)9783319060828 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2017-11-10Bibliographically approved
Nieminen, K., Berg, I., Frankenstein, K., Viita, L., Larsson, K., Persson, U., . . . Wijma, K. (2016). Internet-provided cognitive behaviour therapy of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth—a randomized controlled trial. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 45(4), 287-306
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-provided cognitive behaviour therapy of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth—a randomized controlled trial
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2016 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 287-306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of trauma-focused guided Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for relieving posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following childbirth, a problem that about 3% women encounter postpartum. Following inclusion, 56 traumatized women were randomized to either treatment or to a waiting list control group. Primary outcome measures were the Traumatic Event Scale (TES) and Impact of Event Scale—Reversed (IES-R). Secondary measures were Beck depression inventory II, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Beck Anxiety Inventory, Quality Of Life Inventory and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions. The treatment was guided by a clinician and lasted eight weeks and comprised eight modules of written text. The between-group effect size (ES) was d = .82 (p < .0001) for the IES-R. The ES for the TES was small (d = .36) and not statistically significant (p = .09). A small between-group ES (d = .20; p = .02) was found for the PHQ-9. The results from pre- to post-treatment showed large within-group ESs for PTSD symptoms in the treatment group both on the TES (d = 1.42) and the IES-R (d = 1.30), but smaller ESs in the control group from inclusion to after deferred treatment (TES, d = .80; IES-R d = .45). In both groups, the treatment had positive effects on comorbid depression and anxiety, and in the treatment group also on quality of life. The results need to be verified in larger trials. Further studies are also needed to examine long-term effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Childbirth; Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT); posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); trauma-focused psychotherapy
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127695 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2016.1169626 (DOI)000379764500003 ()27152849 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Linkoping University (LiU) Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning; Region Council in Ostergotland (RO)

Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Delisle, C., Sandin, S., Forsum, E., Henriksson, H., Trolle-Lagerros, Y., Larsson, C., . . . Löf, M. (2015). A web- and mobile phone-based intervention to prevent obesity in 4-year-olds (MINISTOP): a population-based randomized controlled trial. BMC Public Health, 15(95)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A web- and mobile phone-based intervention to prevent obesity in 4-year-olds (MINISTOP): a population-based randomized controlled trial
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2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, no 95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem globally. Overweight and obesity may be established as early as 2-5 years of age, highlighting the need for evidence-based effective prevention and treatment programs early in life. In adults, mobile phone based interventions for weight management (mHealth) have demonstrated positive effects on body mass, however, their use in child populations has yet to be examined. The aim of this paper is to report the study design and methodology of the MINSTOP (Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers) trial. Methods/Design: A two-arm, parallel design randomized controlled trial in 300 healthy Swedish 4-year-olds is conducted. After baseline measures, parents are allocated to either an intervention-or control group. The 6-month mHealth intervention consists of a web-based application (the MINSTOP app) to help parents promote healthy eating and physical activity in children. MINISTOP is based on the Social Cognitive Theory and involves the delivery of a comprehensive, personalized program of information and text messages based on existing guidelines for a healthy diet and active lifestyle in pre-school children. Parents also register physical activity and intakes of candy, soft drinks, vegetables as well as fruits of their child and receive feedback through the application. Primary outcomes include body fatness and energy intake, while secondary outcomes are time spent in sedentary, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, physical fitness and intakes of fruits and vegetables, snacks, soft drinks and candy. Food and energy intake (Tool for Energy balance in Children, TECH), body fatness (pediatric option for BodPod), physical activity (Actigraph wGT3x-BT) and physical fitness (the PREFIT battery of five fitness tests) are measured at baseline, after the intervention (six months after baseline) and at follow-up (12 months after baseline). Discussion: This novel study will evaluate the effectiveness of a mHealth program for mitigating gain in body fatness among 4-year-old children. If the intervention proves effective it has great potential to be implemented in child-health care to counteract childhood overweight and obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Childhood obesity; Randomized controlled trial; Mobile phones; Body composition
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115821 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-1444-8 (DOI)000349745800001 ()25778151 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working life and Welfare; Karolinska Institute; Bo and Vera Ax:son Johnssons foundation; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [RYC-2010-05957, RYC-2011-09011]

Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Silfvernagel, K., Gren Landell, M., Emanuelsson, M., Carlbring, P. & Andersson, G. (2015). Individually tailored internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for adolescents with anxiety disorders: A pilot effectiveness study. Internet Interventions, 2(3), 297-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individually tailored internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for adolescents with anxiety disorders: A pilot effectiveness study
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2015 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 297-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is the first study of adolescents suffering from anxiety disorder in Sweden to receive individually tailored internet-based treatment within a child and adolescent psychiatric clinic. The primary aim of this effectiveness study was to examine the effects of tailored internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents.

11 adolescents, aged 15-19 years, were allocated to treatment after assessment. Screening consisted of online questionnaires followed by a diagnostic face-to-face interview at the clinic. Treatment consisted of individually prescribed cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) text modules adapted for the age group. Therapist guidance was via an online platform along with telephone support and face-to-face sessions if needed.

Statistically significant improvements were found on all dependent measures immediately following treatment for the 8 adolescents who completed treatment. The within-group effect size on the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the primary outcome measure, was d = 2.51 at post-treatment and 80 percent (4/5) adolescents no longer met DSM-IV criteria for their primary anxiety disorder as measured by the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM- IV: Child and Parent Versions.

Based on the results from this pilot study the tentative conclusion might be that tailored internet delivered CBT could be useful for adolescents with anxiety disorders along with standard treatment delivered in child and adolescent psychiatric clinics.

Keywords
Adolescent;Anxiety disorders;Cognitive behavior therapy;Internet-based treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125381 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2015.07.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-22 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Silfvernagel, K., Carlbring, P., Kabo, J., Edstrom, S., Eriksson, J., Manson, L. & Andersson, G. (2012). Individually Tailored Internet-Based Treatment for Young Adults and Adults With Panic Attacks: Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14(3), 32-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individually Tailored Internet-Based Treatment for Young Adults and Adults With Panic Attacks: Randomized Controlled Trial
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 32-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies on Internet-based treatment with minimal therapist guidance have shown promising results for several specific diagnoses. Objective: To 91) investigate the effects of a tailored, therapist-guided, Internet-based treatment for individuals with reoccurring panic attacks, and 92) to examine whether people in different age groups 918-30 years and 31-45 years) would respond differently to the treatment. Methods: We recruited 149 participants from an online list of individuals having expressed an interest in Internet treatment. Screening consisted of online questionnaires followed by a telephone interview. A total of 57 participants were included after a semistructured diagnostic interview, and they were randomly assigned to an 8-week treatment program 9n = 29) or to a control condition 9n = 28). Treatment consisted of individually prescribed cognitive behavior therapy text modules in conjunction with online therapist guidance. The control group consisted of people on a waitlist who later received treatment. Results: All dependent measures improved significantly immediately following treatment and at the 12-month follow-up. The between-group effect size on the primary outcome measure, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale, was d = 1.41 995% confidence interval 0.81-1.95) at posttreatment. The within-group effect size from pretreatment to 12-month follow-up was d = 1.66 995% confidence interval 1.14-2.35). Age group had no effect, suggesting that age did not influence the outcome. Conclusions: Tailoring an Internet-based treatment can be a feasible approach in the treatment of panic symptoms and comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms. Younger adults benefit as much as adults over 30 years and up to 45 years of age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2012
Keywords
Anxiety; depression; effectiveness; Internet-based treatment; cognitive behavior therapy
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79782 (URN)10.2196/jmir.1853 (DOI)000305797300003 ()
Available from: 2012-08-17 Created: 2012-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-07
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