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Signoret, C. & Rudner, M. (2019). Hearing impairment and perceived clarity of predictable speech. Ear and Hearing, 40(5), 1140-1148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hearing impairment and perceived clarity of predictable speech
2019 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 1140-1148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The precision of stimulus-driven information is less critical for comprehension when accurate knowledge-based predictions of the upcoming stimulus can be generated. A recent study in listeners without hearing impairment (HI) has shown that form- and meaning-based predictability independently and cumulatively enhance perceived clarity of degraded speech. In the present study, we investigated whether form- and meaning-based predictability enhanced the perceptual clarity of degraded speech for individuals with moderate to severe sensorineural HI, a group for whom such enhancement may be particularly important.

Design: Spoken sentences with high or low semantic coherence were degraded by noise-vocoding and preceded by matching or nonmatching text primes. Matching text primes allowed generation of form-based predictions while semantic coherence allowed generation of meaning-based predictions.

Results: The results showed that both form- and meaning-based predictions make degraded speech seem clearer to individuals with HI. The benefit of form-based predictions was seen across levels of speech quality and was greater for individuals with HI in the present study than for individuals without HI in our previous study. However, for individuals with HI, the benefit of meaning-based predictions was only apparent when the speechwas slightly degraded. When it was more severely degraded, the benefit of meaning-based predictions was only seen when matching text primes preceded the degraded speech. The benefit in terms of perceptual clarity of meaning-based predictions was positively related to verbal fluency but not working memory performance.

Conclusions: Taken together, these results demonstrate that, for individuals with HI, form-based predictability has a robust effect on perceptual clarity that is greater than the effect previously shown for individuals without HI. However, when speech quality is moderately or severely degraded, meaning-based predictability is contingent on form-based predictability. Further, the ability to mobilize the lexicon seems to contribute to the strength of meaning-based predictions. Whereas individuals without HI may be able to devote explicit working memory capacity for storing meaning-based predictions, individuals with HI may already be using all available explicit capacity to process the degraded speech and thus become reliant on explicit skills such as their verbal fluency to generate useful meaning-based predictions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
Keywords
Cognitive abilities, Lexical, Linguistic abilities, Noise-vocoding, Perceptual clarity, Phonological, Predictability, Semantic, Speech
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155636 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000689 (DOI)000484370700009 ()30624251 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Signoret, C., Ng, H. N., da Silva, S., Tack, A., Voss, U., Lidö, H. H., . . . Balachandran, C. (2019). Well-Being of Early-Career Researchers: Insights from a Swedish Survey. Higher Education Policy, 32(2), 273-296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Well-Being of Early-Career Researchers: Insights from a Swedish Survey
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2019 (English)In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 273-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several studies have documented the importance of optimal work situation and the general well-being of early-career researchers (ECRs) for enhancing the academic performance of universities. Yet, most studies focused on specific categories of ECRs, or on specific academic disciplines as well as on specific outcomes. With this study, we recognize the need for a broader sample encompassing different categories of ECRs across academic disciplines. In a national survey of Swedish universities, the National Junior Faculty of Sweden (NJF) collected data from ECRs in order to study the influence of work situation and well-being on perceived scientific environment. We observed that work situation and well-being are interdependent and jointly influence each other in shaping the conditions for ideal scientific environment. Importantly, we employ structural equation model (SEM) analysis to account for the endogenous relationship between work situation and personal well-being in predicting perceived scientific environment. Results from SEM indicate that support from the university, work time management, job clarity, contract length and quality of life satisfaction were related to the perceived possibility of conducting the best science. Our research also highlighted individual differences across demographic factors and contract length in the perceived work situation and the possibility of conducting the best science. © 2018 International Association of Universities

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Keywords
early-career researchers, survey, academia, well-being, work situation, Sweden
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145594 (URN)10.1057/s41307-018-0080-1 (DOI)000468989500007 ()2-s2.0-85041856311 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2019-07-01Bibliographically approved
Signoret, C., Blomberg, R., Dahlström, Ö., Rudner, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2018). Modulation of the neural expectation violation marker during speech perception in noise.. In: : . Paper presented at MEGNord 2018 Conference, Stockholm, Sweden, May 16-18 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modulation of the neural expectation violation marker during speech perception in noise.
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159500 (URN)
Conference
MEGNord 2018 Conference, Stockholm, Sweden, May 16-18 2018
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Signoret, C., Blomberg, R., Dahlström, Ö., Andersen, L. M., Lundqvist, D., Rudner, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2018). Resolving discrepancies between incoming auditory information and linguistic expectations. In: Neuroscience 2018: 48th annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience. Paper presented at 48th annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA, USA, Nov 3-7, 2018. Society for Neuroscience
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resolving discrepancies between incoming auditory information and linguistic expectations
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2018 (English)In: Neuroscience 2018: 48th annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience, Society for Neuroscience , 2018Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Speech perception in noise is dependent on stimulus-driven and knowledge-driven processes. Here we investigate the neural correlates and time course of discrepancies between incoming auditory information (i.e. stimulus-driven processing) and linguistic expectations (knowledge-driven processing) by including 20 normal hearing adults in a MEG study. Participants read 48 rhyming sentence pairs beforehand. In the scanner, they listened to sentences that corresponded exactly to the read sentences except that the last word (presented after 1600 millisecond delay and with 50% intelligibility) was only correct in half of the cases. Otherwise, it was 1) phonologically but not semantically related, 2) semantically but not phonologically related, or 3) neither phonologically nor semantically related to the sentence. Participants indicated by button press whether the last word matched the sentence they had read outside the scanner. Behavioural results showed more errors in condition 1 than in conditions 2 or 3, suggesting that phonological compatibility overrides semantic discrepancy when intelligibility is poor. Event-related field analysis demonstrated larger activity on frontal sites for correct than unrelated words, suggesting that the former were more accurately expected than the latter. An early M170 component was also observed, possibly reflecting expectation violation in the auditory modality. Dipole analysis will reveal whether M170 could be modulated by type of linguistic discrepancy. Distributed-network analysis will further our understanding of the time course and neural correlates of discrepancies between incoming auditory information and linguistic expectations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Neuroscience, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159499 (URN)
Conference
48th annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA, USA, Nov 3-7, 2018
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Signoret, C. (2018). Semantic representations involvement during degraded speech perception. In: : . Paper presented at 10th Speech in Noise Workshop, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 11-12 January 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Semantic representations involvement during degraded speech perception
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The perceptual clarity of speech is not entirely dependent on the acoustic quality of the sound. Other resources, such as linguistic representations, are involved during degraded speech perception. For example, presentation of the written version of a degraded sentence before hearing it will enable prior knowledge on the exact speech content, which will make the degraded sentence seems clearer. This phenomenon has been explained by top-down influence of phonological and lexical representations on acoustic processing. Another example is the influence of semantic representations on the intelligibility of degraded speech: degraded sentences are better reported if they are meaningful than meaningless. The question now is whether the semantic representations could further influence the perceptual clarity of degraded speech for both normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. In the reported set of three experiments, grammatically correct Swedish spoken sentences were presented at different sound quality levels, from clear to unintelligible. The sound quality levels were manipulated by using noise vocoding (NV) method in which the number of bands reflects intelligibility: more bands for more intelligibility. HI listeners were provided with amplification according to the Cambridge formula. The sentences had either high (e.g. “His new clothes were from France.”) or low (e.g. “His red school was from the newspaper”) semantic coherence and were matched at the word level. The written version of each spoken word (matching text) or a string of consonants (non-matching text) was presented 200 ms beforehand in a rapid serial visual paradigm. The task of the listeners was to rate the clarity of each spoken sentence on a 7-point Likert scale. Results revealed significant interactions between coherence and text for both groups, showing a benefit of coherence with matching and non-matching text for NH listeners but only with matching text for HI listeners. Significant three-way interactions including sound quality level modified this finding to some extent. Indeed, NH listeners benefitted from semantic coherence with non-matching text at 6 and 12 band NV (but not 3 band) while HI listeners benefitted at 12 band (but not 3 and 6 band). Preliminary fMRI results obtained for NH listeners indicated that processing of semantic coherence with non-matching text is supported by right middle temporal gyrus. The overall pattern of results suggest that NH listeners successfully utilize semantic representations in spoken sentences that are moderately degraded and when no prior knowledge is available. What prevents HI listeners to do the same?

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159502 (URN)
Conference
10th Speech in Noise Workshop, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 11-12 January 2018
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Shirnin, D., Lyxell, B., Dahlström, Ö., Blomberg, R., Rudner, M., Rönnberg, J. & Signoret, C. (2017). Speech perception in noise: prediction patterns of neural pre-activation in lexical processing. In: : . Paper presented at Fourth International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHSCOM2017), Linköping, Sweden,June 18-22, 2017. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Article ID 65.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Speech perception in noise: prediction patterns of neural pre-activation in lexical processing
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to examine whether the neural correlates of lexical expectations could be used to predict speech in noise perception. We analyse mag-netoencephalography (MEG) data from 20 normal hearing participants, who read a set of couplets (a pair of phrases with rhyming end words) prior to the experiment. During the experiment, the participants are asked to listen to the couplets, whose intelligibility is set to 80%. However, the last word is pronounced with a delay of 1600 ms (i.e. expectation gap) and is masked at 50% of intelligibility. At the end of each couplet, the participants are asked to indicate if the last word was cor-rect, i.e. corresponding to the expected word. Given the oscillatory characteristics of neural patterns of lexical expectations during the expectation gap, can we predict the participant’s actual perception of the last word? In order to approach this re-search question, we aim to identify the correlation patterns between the instances of neural pre-activation, occurring during the interval of the expectation gap and the type of the given answer. According to the sequential design of the experiment, the expectation gap is placed 4400 ms prior to the time interval dedicated to the participant’s answer. Machine Learning approach has been chosen as the main tool for the pattern recognition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, 2017
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159501 (URN)
Conference
Fourth International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHSCOM2017), Linköping, Sweden,June 18-22, 2017
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Stenfelt, S., Lunner, T., Ng, E., Lidestam, B., Zekveld, A., Sörqvist, P., . . . Rönnberg, J. (2016). Auditory, signal processing, and cognitive factors  influencing  speech  perception  in  persons with hearing loss fitted with hearing aids – the N200 study. In: : . Paper presented at IHCON2016, International Hearing Aid Research Conference, Tahoe City, California, USA, August 10–14, 2016. , Article ID B46.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auditory, signal processing, and cognitive factors  influencing  speech  perception  in  persons with hearing loss fitted with hearing aids – the N200 study
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the current study was to assess aided speech-in-noise outcomes and relate those measures to auditory sensitivity and processing, different types of cognitive processing abilities, and signal processing in hearing aids.

Material and method: Participants were 200 hearing-aid wearers, with a mean age of 60.8 years, 43% females, with average hearing thresholds in the better ear of 37.4 dB HL. Tests of auditory functions were hearing thresholds, DPOAEs, tests of fine structure processing, IHC dead regions, spectro-temporal modulation, and speech recognition in quiet (PB words). Tests of cognitive processing function were tests of phonological skills, working memory, executive functions and inference making abilities, and general cognitive tests (e.g., tests of cognitive decline and IQ). The outcome test variables were the Hagerman sentences with 50 and 80% speech recognition levels, using two different noises (stationary speech weighted noise and 4-talker babble), and three types of signal processing (linear gain, fast acting compression, and linear gain plus a non-ideal binary mask). Another sentence test included typical and atypical sentences with contextual cues that were tested both audio-visually and in an auditory mode only. Moreover, HINT and SSQ were administrated.

Analysis: Factor analyses were performed separate for the auditory, cognitive, and outcome tests.

Results: The auditory tests resulted in two factors labeled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE, the cognitive tests in one factor (COGNITION), and the outcome tests in the two factors termed NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT that relates to the level of context in the different outcome tests. When age was partialled out, COGNITION was moderately correlated with the TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and NO CONTEXT factors but only weakly correlated with the CONTEXT factor. SENSITIVITY correlated weakly with TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and CONTEXT, and moderately with NO CONTEXT, while TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE showed weak correlation with CONTEXT and moderate correlation with NO CONTEXT. CONTEXT and NO CONTEXT had a  moderate correlation. Moreover, the overall results of the Hagerman sentences showed 0.9 dB worse SNR with fast acting compression compared with linear gain and 5.5 dB better SNR with linear  gain and noise reduction compared with only linear gain.

Conclusions: For hearing aid wearers, the ability to recognize speech in noise is associated with both sensory and cognitive processing abilities when the speech materials have low internal context. These associations are less prominent when the speech material has contextual cues.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159504 (URN)
Conference
IHCON2016, International Hearing Aid Research Conference, Tahoe City, California, USA, August 10–14, 2016
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
Rudner, M. & Signoret, C. (2016). Editorial: The Role of Working Memory and Executive Function in Communication under Adverse Conditions. Frontiers in Psychology, 7(148)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: The Role of Working Memory and Executive Function in Communication under Adverse Conditions
2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, no 148Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2016
Keywords
cognition; communication; adverse conditions; hearing; deafness
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125806 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00148 (DOI)000369870600001 ()26903938 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council

Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Signoret, C., Andin, J., Johnsrude, I. & Rudner, M. (2015). Cumulative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence during speech perception: an fMRI study. In: : . Paper presented at The Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Neurobiology of Language Conference, Chicago, IL, USA, October 15-17, 2015 (pp. 51-51).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cumulative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence during speech perception: an fMRI study
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Semantic coherence and prior knowledge enhance perceptual clarity of degraded speech. Recent study by our team has shown that these two effects interact such that the perceptual clarity of noise-vocoded speech (NVS) is still enhanced by semantic coherence when prior knowledge is available from text cues and prior knowledge enhances perceptual clarity of NVS even when semantic coherence is low (Signoret et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of this interaction. We predicted 1) an effect of matching cues for both sentences with high and low semantic coherence in left-lateralized perisylvian areas (Zekveld et al., 2012) and right superior temporal gyrus (Wild et al., 2012), but stronger for low than for high coherent sentences since more resources are required to process sentences with low semantic coherence in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010) and 2) an effect of semantic coherence in temporal and inferior frontal cortex (Lau et al., 2008). The additive effect of semantic coherence when matching cues were provided should be observed in the angular gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010). Twenty participants (age; M=25.14, SD=5.01) listened to sentences and performed an unrelated attentional task during sparse-imaging fMRI. The sentences had high or low semantic coherence, and were either clear, degraded (6-band NV) or unintelligible (1-band NV). Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either a matching cue or a consonant string. Preliminary results revealed significant main effects of Cue (F(1,228) = 21.26; p < .05 FWE) in the left precentral gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus confirming the results of Zekveld et al (2012), but neither the main effect of Coherence nor the interaction between Cue and Coherence survived FWE correction. In accordance with our predictions, contrasts revealed a greater effect of matching cues for low than for high coherent sentences (t(19) = 6.25; p < .05 FWE) in the left superior temporal gyrus as well as left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44 and 45), suggesting greater involvement of both top-down and bottom-up processing mechanisms during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when sentence coherence is lower. There was a marginally greater effect of semantic coherence (t(19) = 3.58; p < .001unc) even when matching cues were provided in the left angular gyrus, the left middle frontal gyrus and the right superior frontal gyrus, suggesting greater involvement of top-down activation of semantic concepts, executive processes and the phonological store during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when the semantic content of the speech is more readily available.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123961 (URN)
Conference
The Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Neurobiology of Language Conference, Chicago, IL, USA, October 15-17, 2015
Available from: 2016-01-15 Created: 2016-01-15 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
Signoret, C. & Rudner, M. (2015). Facilitative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence on speech perception for listeners with hearing difficulties: influence of auditory and cognitive abilities.. In: : . Paper presented at 6th Aging and Speech Communication Research Conference 2015 (“ASC15”) Bloomington, Indiana, USA October 11-14, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence on speech perception for listeners with hearing difficulties: influence of auditory and cognitive abilities.
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123962 (URN)
Conference
6th Aging and Speech Communication Research Conference 2015 (“ASC15”) Bloomington, Indiana, USA October 11-14, 2015
Available from: 2016-01-15 Created: 2016-01-15 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8903-7931

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