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Byrne, Brian
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Christopher, M., Hulslander, J., Byrne, B., Samuelsson, S., Keenan, J., Pennington, B., . . . Olson, R. (2015). Genetic and environmental etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading. Child Development, 86(2), 342-361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic and environmental etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading
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2015 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 342-361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study explored the environmental and genetic etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading and spelling. Twin pairs (n = 489) were assessed before kindergarten (M = 4.9 years), post-first grade (M = 7.4 years), and post-fourth grade (M = 10.4 years). Genetic influences on five prereading skills (print knowledge, rapid naming, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and verbal memory) were primarily responsible for relations with word reading and spelling. However, relations with post-fourth-grade reading comprehension were due to both genetic and shared environmental influences. Genetic and shared environmental influences that were common among the prereading variables covaried with reading and spelling, as did genetic influences unique to verbal memory (only post-fourth-grade comprehension), print knowledge, and rapid naming.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116486 (URN)10.1111/cdev.12295 (DOI)000352104000002 ()25263167 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Elwér, Å., Gustafson, S., Byrne, B., Olson, R., Keenan, J. & Samuelsson, S. (2014). A Retrospective Longitudinal Study of Cognitive and Language Skills in Poor Reading Comprehension.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Retrospective Longitudinal Study of Cognitive and Language Skills in Poor Reading Comprehension
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2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Fifty-six specific poor reading comprehenders (SPRC) were selected in grade 4 and retrospectively compared to good comprehenders at preschool age 5 and at the end of kindergarten, grade 1 and 2. The results showed a widespread language-deficit profile in children with SPRC, including deficits in vocabulary, grammar, verbal memory and early phonological awareness in a large part of the sample beginning in preschool. The reading comprehension deficits in children with SPRC were not as apparent in earlier assessments at grade 1 and 2, likely because of the greater dependence on word decoding in reading comprehension in the early grades.

Keywords
poor comprehenders, reading comprehension, longitudinal study, preschool language skills, core deficits
National Category
Educational Sciences Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110034 (URN)
Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2014-09-01Bibliographically approved
Byrne, B., Samuelsson, S. & Olson, R. (2014). Reading and reading acquisition in European languages. In: Heather Winskel and Prakash Padakannaya (Ed.), South and Southeast Asian psycholinguistics: (pp. 159-170). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading and reading acquisition in European languages
2014 (English)In: South and Southeast Asian psycholinguistics / [ed] Heather Winskel and Prakash Padakannaya, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, p. 159-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105492 (URN)9781107017764 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-03-25 Created: 2014-03-25 Last updated: 2014-04-01
Fujisawa, K. K., Wadsworth, S. J., Kakihana, S., Olson, R. K., DeFries, J. C., Byrne, B. & Ando, J. (2013). A multivariate twin study of early literacy in Japanese kana. Learning and individual differences, 24, 160-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multivariate twin study of early literacy in Japanese kana
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2013 (English)In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 24, p. 160-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This first Japanese twin study of early literacy development investigated the extent to which genetic and environmental factors influence individual differences in prereading skills in 238 pairs of twins at 42 months of age. Twin pairs were individually tested on measures of phonological awareness, kana letter name/sound knowledge, receptive vocabulary, visual perception, nonword repetition, and digit span. Results obtained from univariate behavioral-genetic analyses yielded little evidence for genetic influences, but substantial shared-environmental influences, for all measures. Phenotypic confirmatory factor analysis suggested three correlated factors: phonological awareness, letter name/sound knowledge, and general prereading skills. Multivariate behavioral genetic analyses confirmed relatively small genetic and substantial shared environmental influences on the factors. The correlations among the three factors were mostly attributable to shared environment. Thus, shared environmental influences play an important role in the early reading development of Japanese children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Japanese kana syllabary, Early literacy, Behavioral genetics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93260 (URN)10.1016/j.lindif.2012.12.018 (DOI)000317542700020 ()
Available from: 2013-05-28 Created: 2013-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Elwér, Å., Keenan, J., Olson, R., Byrne, B. & Samuelsson, S. (2013). Longitudinal stability and predictors of poor oral comprehenders and poor decoders. Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), 115(3), 497-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal stability and predictors of poor oral comprehenders and poor decoders
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2013 (English)In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 497-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two groups of fourth-grade children were selected from a population sample (= 926) to be either poor oral comprehenders (poor oral comprehension but normal word decoding) or poor decoders (poor decoding but normal oral comprehension). By examining both groups in the same study with varied cognitive and literacy predictors, and examining them both retrospectively and prospectively, we could assess how distinctive and stable the predictors of each deficit are. Predictors were assessed retrospectively at preschool and at the end of kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. Group effects were significant at all test occasions, including those for preschool vocabulary (worse in poor oral comprehenders) and rapid automatized naming (RAN) (worse in poor decoders). Preschool RAN and vocabulary prospectively predicted Grade 4 group membership (77–79% correct classification) within the selected samples. Reselection in preschool of “at-risk” poor decoder and poor oral comprehender subgroups based on these variables led to significant but relatively weak prediction of subtype membership at Grade 4. Implications of the predictive stability of our results for identification and intervention of these important subgroups are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Early identification, Simple view of reading, Poor decoders, Poor oral comprehenders, Reading disability, Longitudinal study
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-92780 (URN)10.1016/j.jecp.2012.12.001 (DOI)000320740400008 ()
Available from: 2013-05-22 Created: 2013-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Christopher, M., Hulslander, J., Byrne, B., Samuelsson, S., Keenan, J., Pennington, B., . . . Olson, R. (2013). The genetic and environmental etiologies of individual differences in early reading growth in Australia, the United States and Scandinavia. Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), 115(3), 453-467
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genetic and environmental etiologies of individual differences in early reading growth in Australia, the United States and Scandinavia
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2013 (English)In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 453-467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This first cross-country twin study of individual differences in reading growth from post-kindergarten to post-second grade analyzed data from 487 twin pairs from the United States, 267 twin pairs from Australia, and 280 twin pairs from Scandinavia. Data from two reading measures were fit to biometric latent growth models. Individual differences for the reading measures at post-kindergarten in the United States and Australia were due primarily to genetic influences and to both genetic and shared environmental influences in Scandinavia. In contrast, individual differences in growth generally had large genetic influences in all countries. These results suggest that genetic influences are largely responsible for individual differences in early reading development. In addition, the timing of the start of formal literacy instruction may affect the etiology of individual differences in early reading development but have only limited influence on the etiology of individual differences in growth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Individual differences, Early word reading development, Early reading comprehension development, Genetic, Twins, Cross-linguistic
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-92781 (URN)10.1016/j.jecp.2013.03.008 (DOI)000320740400005 ()
Available from: 2013-05-22 Created: 2013-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Arnett, A., Pennington, B., Friend, A., Willcutt, E., Byrne, B., Samuelsson, S. & Olson, R. (2013). The SWAN captures variance at the negative and positive ends of the ADHD Symptom dimension. Journal of Attention Disorders, 17(2), 152-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The SWAN captures variance at the negative and positive ends of the ADHD Symptom dimension
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 152-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behavior (SWAN) Rating Scale differs from previous parent reports of ADHD in that it was designed to also measure variability at the positive end of the symptom spectrum. Method: The psychometric properties of the SWAN were tested and compared with an established measure of ADHD, the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale (DBRS). Results: The SWAN demonstrates comparable validity, reliability, and heritability to the DBRS. Furthermore, plots of the SWAN and DBRS reveal heteroscedasticity, which supports the SWAN as a preferred measure of positive attention and impulse regulation behaviors. Conclusion: The ability of the SWAN to measure additional variance at the adaptive end of the ADHD symptom dimensions makes it a promising tool for behavioral genetic studies of ADHD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87342 (URN)10.1177/1087054711427399 (DOI)000313266700007 ()
Available from: 2013-01-16 Created: 2013-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Coventry, W., Anton-Mendez, I., Ellis, E. M., Levisen, C., Byrne, B., H P van Daal, V. & Ellis, N. C. (2012). The Etiology of Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition in Australian School Students: A Behavior-Genetic Study. Language learning, 62(3), 880-901
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Etiology of Individual Differences in Second Language Acquisition in Australian School Students: A Behavior-Genetic Study
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2012 (English)In: Language learning, ISSN 0023-8333, E-ISSN 1467-9922, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 880-901Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present one of the first behavior-genetic studies of individual differences in school students levels of achievement in instructed second language acquisition (ISLA). We assessed these language abilities in Australian twin pairs (maximum N pairs = 251) by means of teacher ratings, class rankings, and self-ratings of proficiency, and used the classic twin design to estimate the relative influences of genes, shared (family/school) environment, and unique environment. Achievement in ISLA was more influenced by additive genetic effects (72%, 68%, and 38% for teacher ratings, class rankings, and twin self-ratings, respectively) than by shared environment effects, which were generally not substantial (20%, 07%, and 13%). Genetic effects distinct to speaking and listening, on the one hand, and reading and writing, on the other, were evident for the twin self-ratings. We discuss the limitations and implications of these findings and point to research questions that could profitably be addressed in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
twin, behavior genetics, second language acquisition, reading, writing, speaking, listening
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81821 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9922.2012.00718.x (DOI)000307719700007 ()
Available from: 2012-09-26 Created: 2012-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Byrne, B., Olson, R. & Samuelsson, S. (2012). The longitudinal perspective on developmental disorders (1ed.). In: Chloë R. Marshall (Ed.), Current issues in developmental disorders: (pp. 73-92). Hove: Psychology Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The longitudinal perspective on developmental disorders
2012 (English)In: Current issues in developmental disorders / [ed] Chloë R. Marshall, Hove: Psychology Press, 2012, 1, p. 73-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

"Cognitive development in children is a highly complex process which, while remarkably resilient, can be disrupted in a variety of ways. This volume focuses on two types of neurodevelopmental disorder: syndromic conditions, such as fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome and Velocardiofacial syndrome; and non-syndromic conditions including dyslexia, specific language impairment, autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This book provides a state-of-the-art review of current research and covers key topics across the full range of developmental disorders. Topics covered include: diagnosis and comorbidity genetics longitudinal studies computational models distinguishing disorder from deprivation/delay language and culture the history of research into developmental disorders The book also looks at how the study of developmental disorders has contributed to our understanding of typical development, and themes emerge that are common across chapters, including intervention and education, and the neurobiological bases of developmental disorders. The result is a fascinating and thought-provoking volume that will be indispensable to advanced students, researchers and practitioners in the fields of developmental psychology, neuropsychology, speech and language therapy and other developmental disorders"-- 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hove: Psychology Press, 2012 Edition: 1
Series
Current issues in developmental psychology ; 1
Keywords
Developmental disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Utvecklingsstörning, Mental retardation
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84949 (URN)978-1-84872-084-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-10-29 Created: 2012-10-29 Last updated: 2014-11-14Bibliographically approved
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