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Månsson, Kristoffer N T
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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Månsson, K. N., Salami, A., Frick, A., Carlbring, P., Andersson, G., Furmark, T. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2016). Neuroplasticity in response to cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder. Translational Psychiatry, 6(e727)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuroplasticity in response to cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder
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2016 (English)In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 6, no e727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients with anxiety disorders exhibit excessive neural reactivity in the amygdala, which can be normalized by effective treatment like cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Mechanisms underlying the brains adaptation to anxiolytic treatments are likely related both to structural plasticity and functional response alterations, but multimodal neuroimaging studies addressing structure-function interactions are currently missing. Here, we examined treatment-related changes in brain structure (gray matter (GM) volume) and function (blood-oxygen level dependent, BOLD response to self-referential criticism) in 26 participants with social anxiety disorder randomly assigned either to CBT or an attention bias modification control treatment. Also, 26 matched healthy controls were included. Significant time x treatment interactions were found in the amygdala with decreases both in GM volume (family-wise error (FWE) corrected P-FWE = 0.02) and BOLD responsivity (P-FWE = 0.01) after successful CBT. Before treatment, amygdala GM volume correlated positively with anticipatory speech anxiety (P-FWE = 0.04), and CBT-induced reduction of amygdala GM volume (pre-post) correlated positively with reduced anticipatory anxiety after treatment (P-FWE <= 0.05). In addition, we observed greater amygdala neural responsivity to self-referential criticism in socially anxious participants, as compared with controls (P-FWE = 0.029), before but not after CBT. Further analysis indicated that diminished amygdala GM volume mediated the relationship between decreased neural responsivity and reduced social anxiety after treatment (P = 0.007). Thus, our results suggest that improvement-related structural plasticity impacts neural responsiveness within the amygdala, which could be essential for achieving anxiety reduction with CBT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127755 (URN)10.1038/tp.2015.218 (DOI)000373892200004 ()26836415 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University; Swedish Research Council; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research; LJ Boethius Foundation; PRIMA Psychiatry Research Foundation

Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Brännström, J., Öberg, M., Ingo, E., Månsson, K. N., Andersson, G., Lunner, T. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2016). The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients. Internet Interventions, 4(1), 82-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients
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2016 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126519 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2016.01.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Tudor Tulbure, B., Szentagotai, A., David, O., Stefan, S., Månsson, K. N., David, D. & Andersson, G. (2015). Internet-Delivered Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder in Romania: A Randomized Controlled Trial. PLoS ONE, 10(5), e0123997
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-Delivered Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder in Romania: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, p. e0123997-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Aims Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (iCBT) for social anxiety disorder has been found effective, as attested by independently conducted randomized controlled trials in four languages. The study aim is to test the efficacy of an iCBT program in a culture where it was not tested before (i.e. Romania). Methods Participants (n = 76) were recruited, screened and randomized to either a nine-week guided iCBT or a wait-list control group in April and May 2012. Self-report measures were collected before (April 2012) and after the intervention (July 2012), as well as six months later (January 2013). Although social anxiety was assessed with multiple measures, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - Self Report version (LSAS-SR) and Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) were used as the primary outcome measures. Results A significant difference with a large between-group effect size in favor of iCBT was found (Cohens d = 1.19 for LSAS-SR and d = 1.27 for SPIN). Recovery rates show that 36.8% (n = 14) in the treatment group score below the SPIN clinical cut-off compared to only 2.6% (n = 1) in the wait-list control group. Post-intervention clinical interviews also revealed that 34.2% (n = 13) of the treatment group was completely recovered (full remission) while additionally 36.8%(n = 14) retained some social anxiety symptoms (partial remission). However, an important study limitation is that post-intervention interviewers were not blinded to the study conditions. The program also effectively reduced depression and dysfunctional thinking (between-group Cohens d = 0.84 for depression and d = 0.63 for dysfunctional thinking). Moreover, the iCBT intervention appears to have a long-term impact for participants functioning, as the treatment gains were maintained six months later. Conclusions Internet-delivered interventions display a high potential to quickly and widely disseminate effective evidence-based programs around the world. This study provides support for guided iCBT as a promising treatment approach in Romania.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118857 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0123997 (DOI)000353943000013 ()25938241 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Sectoral Operational Program for Human Resources Development; European Social Fund [POSDRU 89/1.5/S/60189]; Postdoctoral Programs for Sustainable Development in a Knowledge Based Society; Linkoping University, Sweden

Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Månsson, K. N., Frick, A., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Marquand, A. F., Williams, S. C., Carlbring, P., . . . Furmark, T. (2015). Predicting long-term outcome of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder using fMRI and support vector machine learning.. Translational psychiatry, 5, e530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting long-term outcome of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder using fMRI and support vector machine learning.
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2015 (English)In: Translational psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 5, p. e530-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD), but many patients do not respond sufficiently and a substantial proportion relapse after treatment has ended. Predicting an individual's long-term clinical response therefore remains an important challenge. This study aimed at assessing neural predictors of long-term treatment outcome in participants with SAD 1 year after completion of Internet-delivered CBT (iCBT). Twenty-six participants diagnosed with SAD underwent iCBT including attention bias modification for a total of 13 weeks. Support vector machines (SVMs), a supervised pattern recognition method allowing predictions at the individual level, were trained to separate long-term treatment responders from nonresponders based on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to self-referential criticism. The Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale was the main instrument to determine treatment response at the 1-year follow-up. Results showed that the proportion of long-term responders was 52% (12/23). From multivariate BOLD responses in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) together with the amygdala, we were able to predict long-term response rate of iCBT with an accuracy of 92% (confidence interval 95% 73.2-97.6). This activation pattern was, however, not predictive of improvement in the continuous Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale-Self-report version. Follow-up psychophysiological interaction analyses revealed that lower dACC-amygdala coupling was associated with better long-term treatment response. Thus, BOLD response patterns in the fear-expressing dACC-amygdala regions were highly predictive of long-term treatment outcome of iCBT, and the initial coupling between these regions differentiated long-term responders from nonresponders. The SVM-neuroimaging approach could be of particular clinical value as it allows for accurate prediction of treatment outcome at the level of the individual.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117119 (URN)10.1038/tp.2015.22 (DOI)000367654700004 ()25781229 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council; Linkoping University; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare; PRIMA Psychiatry Research Foundation; Kings College London Centre of Excellence in Medical Engineering - Wellcome Trust; Engineering and Physica

Available from: 2015-04-16 Created: 2015-04-16 Last updated: 2016-11-18
Brännström, J. K., Öberg, M., Ingo, E., Månsson, K. N. T., Andersson, G., Lunner, T. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2015). The Process of Developing an Internet-Based Support System for Audiologists and First-Time Hearing Aid Clients. American Journal of Audiology, 24(3), 320-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Process of Developing an Internet-Based Support System for Audiologists and First-Time Hearing Aid Clients
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 320-324Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In audiologic practice, complementary information sources and access to the clinician between appointments improve information retention and facilitate adjustment behaviors. An Internet-based support system is a novel way to support information sharing and clinician access. Purpose: This research forum article describes the process of developing an Internet-based support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients. Method: The iterative development process, including revisions by 4 research audiologists and 4 clinical audiologists, is described. The final system is exemplified. Conclusion: An Internet-based support system was successfully developed for audiologic practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2015
National Category
Applied Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123084 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0094 (DOI)000364315200013 ()26649539 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Council for Wealth, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Laplante.Lévesque, A., Brännström, J., Öberg, M., Ingo, E., Månsson, K., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2014). An online information transfer support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients. In: : . Paper presented at XXXII World Congress of Audiology, Brisbane, Australia, 3-7 May 2014.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An online information transfer support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124343 (URN)
Conference
XXXII World Congress of Audiology, Brisbane, Australia, 3-7 May 2014
Available from: 2016-01-26 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Månsson, K. N., Carlbring, P., Frick, A., Engman, J., Olsson, C.-J., Bodlund, O., . . . Andersson, G. (2013). Altered neural correlates of affective processing after internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder. Psychiatry Research, 214(3), 229-237
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered neural correlates of affective processing after internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder
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2013 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 214, no 3, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Randomized controlled trials have yielded promising results for internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) for patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). The present study investigated anxiety-related neural changes after iCBT for SAD. The amygdala is a critical hub in the neural fear network, receptive to change using emotion regulation strategies and a putative target for iCBT. Twenty-two subjects were included in pre- and post-treatment functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T assessing neural changes during an affective face processing task. Treatment outcome was assessed using social anxiety self-reports and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. ICBT yielded better outcome than ABM (66% vs. 25% CGI-I responders). A significant differential activation of the left amygdala was found with relatively decreased reactivity after iCBT. Changes in the amygdala were related to a behavioral measure of social anxiety. Functional connectivity analysis in the iCBT group showed that the amygdala attenuation was associated with increased activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and decreased activity in the right ventrolateral and dorsolateral (dlPFC) cortices. Treatment-induced neural changes with iCBT were consistent with previously reported studies on regular CBT and emotion regulation in general.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Amygdala, Cognitive behavior therapy, dlPFC, fMRI, mOFC, vlPFC
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102160 (URN)10.1016/j.pscychresns.2013.08.012 (DOI)000327531600008 ()24064198 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-12-01 Created: 2013-12-01 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Månsson, K. N., Skagius Ruiz, E., Gervind, E., Dahlin, M. & Andersson, G. (2013). Development and Initial Evaluation of an Internet-Based Support System for Face-to-Face Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Proof of Concept Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15(12)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and Initial Evaluation of an Internet-Based Support System for Face-to-Face Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Proof of Concept Study
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 15, no 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Evidence-based psychological treatments, such as cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), have been found to be effective in treating several anxiety and mood disorders. Nevertheless, issues regarding adherence are common, such as poor patient compliance on homework assignments and therapists drifting from strictly evidence-based CBT. The development of Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) has been intensive in the past decade and results show that guided ICBT can be as effective as face-to-face CBT but also indicate a need to integrate the two forms of CBT delivery. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: In this study, we developed and tested a new treatment format in which ICBT and face-to-face therapy were blended. We designed a support system accessible via the Internet (using a computer or an Apple iPad) for patients and therapists delivering CBT face-to-face. The support system included basic CBT components and a library of interventions gathered from existing ICBT manuals. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: The study involved 15 patients with mild to moderate anxiety or depression (or both). Eight therapists conducted the treatments. All participants were interviewed after the nine-week intervention. Further, patients provided self-reports on clinical measures pre- and post-trial, as well as at a 12-month follow-up. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: A reduction was found in symptom scores across all measures. The reliable change index ranged from 60% to 87% for depression and anxiety. Large effect sizes (Cohens d) ranging from 1.62 (CI 95% 0.59-2.66) to 2.43 (CI 95% 1.12-3.74) were found. There were no missing data and no treatment dropouts. In addition, the results had been maintained at the 12-month follow-up. Qualitative interviews revealed that the users perceived the support system as beneficial. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The results suggest that modern information technology can effectively blend with face-to-face treatments and be used to facilitate communication and structure in therapy, thus reducing therapist drift.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Journal of Medical Internet Research / JMIR Publications, 2013
Keywords
cognitive behavior therapy, Internet, anxiety, depression, Apple iPad
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102847 (URN)10.2196/jmir.3031 (DOI)000328160000009 ()
Available from: 2014-01-07 Created: 2014-01-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Tulbure, B. T., Månsson, K. N. & Andersson, G. (2012). Internet treatment for social anxiety disorder in Romania: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials, 13(202)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet treatment for social anxiety disorder in Romania: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
2012 (English)In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 13, no 202Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common anxiety disorders and is associated with marked impairments. However, a small proportion of individuals with SAD seek and receive treatment. Internet-administrated cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) has been found to be an effective treatment for SAD. This trial will be the first Internet-delivered guided self-help intervention for SAD in Romania.

METHODS: Participants with social anxiety disorder (N = 96) will be recruited via newspapers, online banners and Facebook. Participants will be randomized to either: a) an active treatment, or b) a waiting list control group.The treatment will have a guided iCBT format and will last for nine weeks. Self-report questionnaires on social phobia, anxiety, depression, treatment credibility and irrational thinking will be used. All assessments will be collected pre, post and at follow-up (six months after intervention). Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - Self-Report version (LSAS-SR) will be the primary outcome measure and will be administrated on a weekly basis in both conditions.

DISCUSSION: The present randomized controlled trial investigates the efficacy of an Internet-administered intervention in reducing social anxiety symptoms in a culture where this form of treatment has not been tested. This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the efficacy of iCBT, and the results might lead to an increase of the accessibility of evidence-based psychological treatment in Romania.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01557894.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2012
Keywords
Internet-administrated cognitive behavior therapy; Social anxiety disorder; Social phobia; Guided self-help; Randomized controlled trial
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87717 (URN)10.1186/1745-6215-13-202 (DOI)000314102300002 ()23111108 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-01-22 Created: 2013-01-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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