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Henriksson, H., Henriksson, P., Tynelius, P. & Ortega, F. B. (2019). Muscular weakness in adolescence is associated with disability 30 years later: a population-based cohort study of 1.2 million men. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 53(19), 1221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscular weakness in adolescence is associated with disability 30 years later: a population-based cohort study of 1.2 million men
2019 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 53, no 19, p. 1221-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations of muscular strength in adolescence with later disability pension (DP), across different body mass index (BMI) categories and in combination with aerobic fitness.

METHOD: This prospective cohort study consisted of males aged 16-19 years, recruited from the Swedish military conscription register between 1969 and 1994. A total of 1 212 503 adolescents met all the inclusion criteria and were therefore included in the analyses. Knee extension, handgrip and elbow flexion strength and aerobic fitness (bicycle ergometer test) were measured during conscription. Causes of DP were retrieved from the Social Insurance Office between years 1971 and 2012 (average follow-up time: 29.6 years).

RESULTS: Knee extension strength in adolescence was inversely associated with men's risk of obtaining DP due to all causes (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.36 to 1.44 for lowest vs highest strength quintile). Thus, muscular weakness was associated with DP. The risk associated with low muscular strength differed between specific causes of DP and the strongest associations were found for psychiatric, nervous system and other causes (HRs between 1.47 and 1.90 for lowest vs highest quintile). Being strong was associated with lower DP risk across BMI categories and being unfit, weak and obese was associated with the highest DP risk (HR 3.70, 95% CI 2.99 to 4.58).

CONCLUSION: There was a strong association between muscular weakness and disability. A combination of muscular weakness and low aerobic fitness was an especially important risk factor for disability. This adds weight to call for muscular strength and fitness enhancing exercise for adolescents in all BMI categories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
aerobic fitness, bmi, disability, strength
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155806 (URN)10.1136/bjsports-2017-098723 (DOI)000489253100010 ()29921654 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:  Swedish Society of Medicine; County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden; Henning and Johan Throne-Holst Foundation; Strategic Research Area Health Care Science, Karolinska Institutet/Umea University; European Unions Horizon 2020 research and innovation progra

Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, P., Leppanen, M. H., Henriksson, H., Nystrom, C. D., Cadenas-Sanchez, C., Ek, A., . . . Löf, M. (2019). Physical fitness in relation to later body composition in pre-school children. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22(5), 574-579
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical fitness in relation to later body composition in pre-school children
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 574-579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Although physical fitness is considered a marker of health in youth, little is known whether physical fitness in pre-school age is related to later body composition. Thus, this study investigated (i) associations of physical fitness at 4.5 years of age with body composition 12 months later and (ii) whether improvements in physical fitness during the 12-month follow-up were associated with changes in body composition.

Design

This study included 142 children, measured at 4.5 and 5.5 years, from the control group of the MINISTOP trial.

Methods

Physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength and motor fitness) was measured using the PREFIT test battery. Body composition was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography.

Results

In adjusted regression analyses, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness at 4.5 years were associated with a lower fat mass index at 5.5 years (standardized β= −0.182 to −0.229, p ≤ 0.028). Conversely, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength as well as motor fitness at 4.5 years of age were associated with a higher fat-free mass index (standardized β = 0.255–0.447, p ≤ 0.001). Furthermore, improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness during the 12-month follow-up period were associated with decreases in fat mass index and/or % fat mass.

Conclusions

In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence of the importance of physical fitness early in life. Nevertheless, further studies are needed in order to clarify the influence of physical fitness in the pre-school age with later health outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Fat-free mass; Fat mass; Cardiorespiratory fitness; Muscular strength; Motor fitness; Pre-school
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158365 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2018.11.024 (DOI)000468256300015 ()30573178 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058494155 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2012-2883]; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2012-0906]; Bo and Vera Axson John sons Foundation; Karolinska Institutet; Strategic Research Area Health Care Science, Karolinska Institutet/Umed University; Juho Vainio Foundation; Swedish Society of Medicine; County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden; Henning and Johan Throne -Hoist Foundation; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [RYC-2010-05957, RYC-2011-09011, BES-2014-068829]

Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
Leppänen, M. H., Delisle Nyström, C., Henriksson, P., Pomeroy, J., Ruiz, J. R., Ortega, F. B., . . . Löf, M. (2016). Physical activity intensity, sedentary behavior, body composition and physical fitness in 4-year-old children: results from the ministop trial. International Journal of Obesity, 40(7), 1126-1133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity intensity, sedentary behavior, body composition and physical fitness in 4-year-old children: results from the ministop trial
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 1126-1133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Existing knowledge on associations of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) with body composition and physical fitness in preschoolers is limited. OBJECTIVE: To examine associations of PA and SB with body composition and physical fitness in healthy Swedish 4-year-old children. METHODS: We utilized baseline data collected in 2014 for the population-based MINISTOP trial (n = 307). Light-intensity PA (LPA), moderate-intensity PA (MPA), vigorous-intensity PA (VPA), moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and SB were measured using accelerometry (ActiGraph-wGT3x-BT). Body composition was measured using air-displacement plethysmography, and physical fitness (that is, cardiorespiratory fitness, lower and upper body muscular strength and motor fitness) was measured using the PREFIT fitness test battery. Multiple linear regression models adjusted for relevant confounders, and in addition, isotemporal substitution models were applied. RESULTS: Greater MVPA was associated with lower fat mass percent (%FM, P = 0.015), and greater VPA and MVPA were associated with higher fat-free mass index (FFMI, P = 0.002 and P = 0.011). In addition, greater VPA and MVPA were associated with higher scores for all physical fitness tests (P = 0.042 to Pamp;lt;0.001). The results for MVPA were primarily due to VPA. SB was associated with weaker handgrip strength (P = 0.031) when PA was not adjusted, but after adjusting also for VPA, the significant association disappeared (P = 0.25). Substituting 5 min per day of SB, LPA or MPA with 5 min per day of VPA was associated with higher FFMI and better scores for cardiorespiratory fitness and motor fitness. Correspondingly, substituting 5 min per day of VPA with SB or LPA was associated with weaker performance for lower muscular strength. CONCLUSIONS: Time spent on VPA was associated with higher FFMI and better physical fitness. The results suggest that promoting VPA may be important to improve childhood body composition and physical fitness already at an early age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130400 (URN)10.1038/ijo.2016.54 (DOI)000379498200012 ()27087109 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2012-2883]; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2012-0906]; Bo and Vera Axson Johnsons Foundation; Karolinska Institutet; Juho Vainio Foundation; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [RYC-2010-05957, RYC-2011-09011, BES-2014-068829]; Johan Throne-Holsts Foundation

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Delisle Nystrom, C., Henriksson, P., Alexandrou, C. & Löf, M. (2016). The Tanita SC-240 to Assess Body Composition in Pre-School Children: An Evaluation against the Three Component Model. Nutrients, 8(6), 371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Tanita SC-240 to Assess Body Composition in Pre-School Children: An Evaluation against the Three Component Model
2016 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 371-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Quick, easy-to-use, and valid body composition measurement options for young children are needed. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of the bioelectrical impedance (BIA) device, Tanita SC-240, to measure fat mass (FM), fat free mass (FFM) and body fatness (BF%) in 40 healthy, Swedish 5.5 years old children against the three component model (3C model). Average BF%, FM, and FFM for BIA were: 19.4% +/- 3.9%, 4.1 +/- 1.9 kg, and 16.4 +/- 2.4 kg and were all significantly different (p amp;lt; 0.001) from corresponding values for the 3C model (25.1% +/- 5.5%, 5.3 +/- 2.5 kg, and 15.2 +/- 2.0 kg). Bland and Altman plots had wide limits of agreement for all body composition variables. Significant correlations ranging from 0.81 to 0.96 (p amp;lt; 0.001) were found for BF%, FM, and FFM between BIA and the 3C model. When dividing the children into tertiles for BF%, 60% of children were classified correctly by means of BIA. In conclusion, the Tanita SC-240 underestimated BF% in comparison to the 3C model and had wide limits of agreement. Further work is needed in order to find accurate and easy-to-use methods for assessing body composition in pre-school children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2016
Keywords
Tanita SC-240; bioelectrical impedance; three component model; pre-school
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130293 (URN)10.3390/nu8060371 (DOI)000378783200056 ()27322313 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2012-2883]; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2012-0906]; Bo and Vera Axson Johnsons Foundation; Karolinska Institutet; Swedish Nutrition Foundation; Henning and Johan Throne-Holst Foundation

Available from: 2016-08-01 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Henriksson, P. (2015). Body composition of parents and their infants: methodological, anthropometric, metabolic and genetic studies. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body composition of parents and their infants: methodological, anthropometric, metabolic and genetic studies
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Body composition in infancy may be of importance for later health. In particular, infant body composition may be relevant regarding obesity risk in childhood. Recent advances in body composition methodology using air displacement plethysmography (ADP) have provided possibilities to accurately measure body composition of infants in a quick and non-invasive manner. The aims of this thesis were to study associations of parental body composition using ADP, glucose homeostasis during pregnancy and infant genetics with infant body composition also using ADP. When using ADP in adults, a correction for the thoracic gas volume (TGV) is needed and TGV can be predicted using equations developed in nonpregnant adults. Thus another aim was to study the validity of using such equations during pregnancy.

Parent couples were invited to this study at a routine visit to a maternity clinic in Linköping between September 2008 and October 2010. When the mother was in gestational week 32, parental body composition using ADP and maternal glucose homeostasis variables were assessed. Size and body composition of healthy, singleton and full term (≥ 37 gestational weeks) infants were measured at 1 and 12 weeks of age and a total of 211 infants  were included in the studies. Weight and length at 1 year of age were reported by parents. Saliva samples were collected from the infants to obtain DNA for genotyping of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene.

Body composition results calculated using measured and predicted TGV were compared in 27 women. Results showed that predicted TGV yields a very marginal overestimation (0.5 %) of fat mass (FM). Further, each kg increase in maternal and paternal fat-free mass (FFM) was associated with 15.6 g (P=0.001) and 9.1 g (P=0.007), respectively, more FFM in their 1-week old infants. FM of fathers was not related to infant FM. However, maternal FM was positively associated with FM of daughters (5.8 g/kg, P=0.007), but not of sons (P=0.79) at 1 week of age. Similarly, each standard deviation increase in maternal HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance) was related to 52.7 more g of FM (P<0.001) in 1-weekold daughters, but no such relationship was found for sons (P=0.79). The number of risk alleles at the FTO locus rs9939609 was not associated with infant body mass index (BMI) or infant FM at 1 or 12 weeks of age. However, the number of risk alleles was positively associated (P≤0.033) with infant length at 1 and 12 weeks of age, and the results suggested that this association was stronger in boys than in girls.

The results presented in this thesis show that: i) The use of predicted TGV when applying ADP in gestational week 32 overestimated % FM only slightly. ii) Associations between parental and infant body composition are present early in life. Thus, parental FFM was positively related to FFM in 1-week-old infants. Furthermore, maternal FM and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were positively related to FM of 1-week-old daughters, but no such relationships were observed for sons. iii) The FTO genotype is not associated with infant body fatness at 1 or 12 weeks of age. However, the results suggested that the number of FTO risk alleles is positively associated with infant length, especially in boys.

In conclusion, parental and genetic factors were associated with infant size and body composition and these relationships may be of importance for future body composition and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. p. 67
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1456
National Category
Clinical Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117435 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-117435 (DOI)978-91-7519-094-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-06-02, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 15402Swedish Research Council Formas, 222-2006-614, 222-2008-1332Magnus Bergvall FoundationSwedish Society of MedicineÖstergötland County Council
Available from: 2015-04-27 Created: 2015-04-27 Last updated: 2019-11-15Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, P., Eriksson, B., Forsum, E. & Löf, M. (2015). Gestational weight gain according to Institute of Medicine recommendations in relation to infant size and body composition.. Pediatric Obesity, 10(5), 388-394
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gestational weight gain according to Institute of Medicine recommendations in relation to infant size and body composition.
2015 (English)In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 388-394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Intrauterine life may be a critical period for programming childhood obesity; however, there is insufficient knowledge concerning how gestational weight gain (GWG) affects infant fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM).

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between GWG according to Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations and infant size, FM and FFM. We also investigated if the associations were different for normal-weight and overweight/obese women.

METHODS: This study included 312 healthy Swedish mother-infant pairs. Infant body composition at 1 week of age was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography. Maternal GWG was defined as below, within or above the 2009 IOM recommendations. Multiple regression analyses were used.

RESULTS: Compared with women whose weight gain was within IOM recommendations, women with weight gain below the recommendations had infants that were shorter (-0.7 cm, P = 0.008) when adjusting for confounders. Normal-weight women exceeding IOM recommendations had infants with higher FM (+58 g, P = 0.008) compared with normal-weight women who gained within the recommendations. No corresponding association was observed for overweight/obese women.

CONCLUSIONS: Inadequate GWG was associated with shorter infants, while excessive GWG was associated with greater infant FM for women who were of normal weight before pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115298 (URN)10.1111/ijpo.276 (DOI)000364584300011 ()25521831 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council [15402]; Swedish Research Council Formas [222-2006-614, 222-2008-1332]; AFA Insurance; Medical Faculty at Linkoping University; County Council of Ostergotland

Available from: 2015-03-12 Created: 2015-03-12 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, P., Lof, M. & Forsum, E. (2015). Glucose Homeostasis Variables in Pregnancy versus Maternal and Infant Body Composition. Nutrients, 7(7), 5615-5627
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glucose Homeostasis Variables in Pregnancy versus Maternal and Infant Body Composition
2015 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 5615-5627Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intrauterine factors influence infant size and body composition but the mechanisms involved are to a large extent unknown. We studied relationships between the body composition of pregnant women and variables related to their glucose homeostasis, i.e., glucose, HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance), hemoglobin A(1c) and IGFBP-1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1), and related these variables to the body composition of their infants. Body composition of 209 women in gestational week 32 and of their healthy, singleton and full-term one-week-old infants was measured using air displacement plethysmography. Glucose homeostasis variables were assessed in gestational week 32. HOMA-IR was positively related to fat mass index and fat mass (r(2) = 0.32, p less than 0.001) of the women. Maternal glucose and HOMA-IR values were positively (p 0.006) associated, while IGFBP-1was negatively (p = 0.001) associated, with infant fat mass. HOMA-IR was positively associated with fat mass of daughters (p less than 0.001), but not of sons (p = 0.65) (Sex-interaction: p = 0.042). In conclusion, glucose homeostasis variables of pregnant women are related to their own body composition and to that of their infants. The results suggest that a previously identified relationship between fat mass of mothers and daughters is mediated by maternal insulin resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2015
Keywords
body composition; infant; insulin resistance; pregnancy; sex difference
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121143 (URN)10.3390/nu7075243 (DOI)000359349800033 ()26184296 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [15402]; Swedish Research Council Formas [2008-1332, 2006-614]; Medical Faculty, Linkoping University; County Council of Ostergotland

Available from: 2015-09-08 Created: 2015-09-08 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Henriksson, P., Löf, M. & Forsum, E. (2015). Glucose, insulin, and the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 in the circulation of pregnant women in relation to their own body composition and to that of their infants.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glucose, insulin, and the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 in the circulation of pregnant women in relation to their own body composition and to that of their infants
2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: Intrauterine factors influence infant size and body composition but the mechanisms involved are incompletely known. We studied relationships between the body composition of pregnant women and variables related to their glucose homeostasis, i.e. glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance), haemoglobin A1c and IGFBP-1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1), in their circulation and related these variables to the body composition of their infants.

Methods: Body composition of 209 women in gestational week 32 and of their healthy, singleton and full-term one-week-old infants was measured using air displacement plethysmography. Glucose homeostasis variables were assessed in gestational week 32.

Results: Insulin/HOMA-IR were positively related to body mass index, fat mass index and fat mass (r2=0.32-0.36, P<0.001) of the women. Their glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR values were positively (P≤0.009) associated, while IGFBP-1was negatively (P=0.001) associated, with infant fat mass. Insulin and HOMA-IR were positively associated with fat mass of daughters (P<0.001), but not of sons (P≥0.65) (Sex-interaction: P≤ 0.042).

Conclusion: Glucose homeostasis variables of pregnant women are related to their own body composition and to that of their infants. The results suggested that a previously identified relationship between fat mass of mothers and daughters is mediated by insulin resistance.

Keywords
Body composition, infant, insulin resistance, mother, sex difference
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Clinical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117431 (URN)
Available from: 2015-04-27 Created: 2015-04-27 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, P., Löf, M. & Forsum, E. (2015). Parental fat-free mass is related to the fat-free mass of infants and maternal fat mass is related to the fat mass of infant girls. Acta Paediatrica, 104(5), 491-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental fat-free mass is related to the fat-free mass of infants and maternal fat mass is related to the fat mass of infant girls
2015 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 5, p. 491-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Existing studies suggest that weight and body composition of parents influence the size and body composition of their offspring, but are often inconclusive and conducted by means of inappropriate body composition methodology. Our aim was to study infant size and body composition variables in relation to body composition variables of their mothers and fathers in a well-nourished population using an accurate methodology.

Methods: Between 2008 and 2011, we used air displacement plethysmography to measure the body composition of 209 parent–infant units. Parents were measured when women were in gestational week 32. Their healthy, singleton, full-term infants were measured at 1 week.

Results: Infant fat-free mass in grams was positively related (p ≤ 0.007) to the fat-free mass in kilograms of the mothers (15.6 g/kg) and the fathers (9.1 g/kg). Furthermore, the fat mass of the daughters, but not of the sons, was positively related to the fat mass of the mothers (5.8 g/kg, p = 0.007).

Conclusion: This study found associations between the fat-free mass of parents and infants and an association between the fat mass of mothers and their infant girls. These findings may help to understand early life factors behind overweight and obesity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015
Keywords
Body composition, Father, Infant, Mother, Sex difference
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Clinical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117430 (URN)10.1111/apa.12939 (DOI)000353643400023 ()25645821 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-04-27 Created: 2015-04-27 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Forsum, E., Henriksson, P. & Löf, M. (2014). The Two-Component Model for Calculating Total Body Fat from Body Density: An Evaluation in Healthy Women before, during and after Pregnancy. Nutrients, 6(12), 5888-5899
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Two-Component Model for Calculating Total Body Fat from Body Density: An Evaluation in Healthy Women before, during and after Pregnancy
2014 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 5888-5899Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A possibility to assess body composition during pregnancy is often important. Estimating body density (D-B) and use the two-component model (2CM) to calculate total body fat (TBF) represents an option. However, this approach has been insufficiently evaluated during pregnancy. We evaluated the 2CM, and estimated fat-free mass (FFM) density and variability in 17 healthy women before pregnancy, in gestational weeks 14 and 32, and 2 weeks postpartum based on D-B (underwater weighing), total body water (deuterium dilution) and body weight, assessed on these four occasions. TBF, calculated using the 2CM and published FFM density (TBF2CM), was compared to reference estimates obtained using the three-component model (TBF3CM). TBF2CM minus TBF3CM (mean +/- 2SD) was -1.63 +/- 5.67 (p = 0.031), -1.39 +/- 7.75 (p = 0.16), -0.38 +/- 4.44 (p = 0.49) and -1.39 +/- 5.22 (p = 0.043) % before pregnancy, in gestational weeks 14 and 32 and 2 weeks postpartum, respectively. The effect of pregnancy on the variability of FFM density was larger in gestational week 14 than in gestational week 32. The 2CM, based on D-B and published FFM density, assessed body composition as accurately in gestational week 32 as in non-pregnant adults. Corresponding values in gestational week 14 were slightly less accurate than those obtained before pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2014
Keywords
before pregnancy; body composition; fat-free mass density; gestation; postpartum; total body fat
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113579 (URN)10.3390/nu6125888 (DOI)000346796100032 ()25526240 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [15402]; Swedish Research Council Formas [222-2006-614, 222-2008-1332]; Medical Faculty, Linkoping University; County Council of Ostergotland

Available from: 2015-01-23 Created: 2015-01-23 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2482-7048

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