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Molander, Peter
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Molander, P. (2018). From Detection to Intervention Psychological Aspects of Online Hearing Rehabilitation. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Detection to Intervention Psychological Aspects of Online Hearing Rehabilitation
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Hearing problems are among the most common causes of disability worldwide for adults. It is currently classified as one of the top five causes of years lived with disability. Between the years 2005 and 2015 the global prevalence of hearing loss increased with about 26 %. The negative impact of hearing loss on those affected is not limited to communication problems, as a range of other negative effects can be present, such as increased levels of social isolation, problems in the work-place and psychological distress.

The different studies of the thesis can be summarized in three overall research questions. The first question was if hearing loss can be detected through automated online screening procedures, and what are the characteristics of those who participate in online screening (Study I and II)? The second question focused on development and testing of a measure dealing with psychological acceptance of hearing loss (Study III). Finally, the third research question concerned if online administered guided self-help based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy could help persons with hearing loss and psychological distress (Study IV)?

In the screening studies (Study I and II) an online speech-in-noise hearing test was initially developed and later updated. Screening for hearing problems with this test was found to be feasible, and 16.7 (Study I) and 19% (Study II) of the participants were recommended to seek professional care for their potential hearing loss. These participants had more cognitive problems, were more likely to be of male gender, and had lower levels of education than those without measured hearing problems. Study III showed that it was possible to measure hearing-related acceptance with a new questionnaire and that this measure was a better predictor of disability than instruments measuring anxiety, depression, or measured hearing performance. In Study IV, people with hearing loss and comorbid psychological distress were offered an eight-week long internet-based therapist-guided self-help treatment inspired by ACT. After treatment ended, the intervention group had lower levels of perceived hearing disability, increased ratings of quality of life and reduced depressive symptoms in relation to the wait-list control group. This thesis suggests that the internet can be used to assist early detection, measuring acceptance of hearing loss and finally as a treatment modality for persons who experience distress in relation to their hearing loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018. p. 82
Series
Linköping Studies in Arts and Sciences, ISSN 0282-9800 ; 751Studies from the Swedish Institute for Disability Research, ISSN 1650-1128 ; 92
Keywords
Hearing, Screening, Cognition, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Otorhinolaryngology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152429 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-152429 (DOI)9789176852262 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-09-26, VAL, Hus Vallfarten, Campus Valla, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Ellis, R., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2016). Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study. Ear and Hearing, 37(1), 73-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task.

Design: Data were taken from a sample of 1509 listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old. Participants completed computerized versions of the TMT and an adaptive speech-in-noise recognition test. All testing was conducted via the internet.

Results: The results indicate that better performance on both the simple and complex subtests of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. Thirty-eight percent of the participants had scores on the speech-in-noise test that indicated the presence of a hearing loss.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that the TMT may be a useful tool in the assessment, and possibly the treatment, of speech-recognition difficulties. The results indicate that the relation between speech-in-noise recognition and TMT performance relates both to the capacity of the TMT to index processing speed and to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keywords
Cognition, Internet screening, Speech-in-noise perception, Trail making test
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123218 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000218 (DOI)000367343400008 ()26317162 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (Forte) [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Weineland, S., Andersson, G., Lunner, T., Carlbring, P., Hesser, H., Ingo, E., . . . Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2015). Bridging the Gap Between Hearing Screening and Successful Rehabilitation: Research Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational Interviewing via Internet. American Journal of Audiology, 24(3), 302-306
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging the Gap Between Hearing Screening and Successful Rehabilitation: Research Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational Interviewing via Internet
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 302-306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Studies point to low help-seeking after a failed hearing screening. This research forum article presents the research protocol for a randomized controlled trial of motivational interviewing via the Internet to promote help-seeking in people who have failed an online hearing screening. Method: Adults who fail a Swedish online hearing screening, including a speech-in-noise recognition test, will be randomized to either an intervention group (participating in motivational interviewing) or an active control group (reading a book on history of hearing aids). Both of the conditions will be delivered via the Internet. The primary outcome is experience with seeking health care and using hearing aids 9 months after the intervention. Secondary outcomes are changes in before and after measures of self-reported hearing difficulties, anxiety, depression, and quality of life. Stages of change and self-efficacy in hearing help-seeking are measured immediately after intervention and at a 9-month follow-up for the purpose of mediation analysis. Results: The results of this randomized controlled trial may help bridge the gap between hearing screening and successful hearing rehabilitation. Conclusion: Although no large instantaneous benefits are expected, a slow change toward healthy behaviors-seeking health care and using hearing aids-would shed light on how to use the Internet to assist people with hearing impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC, 2015
National Category
Applied Psychology Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123081 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0012 (DOI)000364315200009 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Council for Wealth, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Molander, P., Hesser, H., Weineland, S., Bergwall, K., Buck, S., Hansson-Malmlof, J., . . . Andersson, G. (2015). Internet-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Psychological Distress Experienced by People With Hearing Problems: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial. American Journal of Audiology, 24(3), 307-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Psychological Distress Experienced by People With Hearing Problems: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 307-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Psychological distress and psychiatric symptoms are prevalent among people with hearing loss or other audiological conditions, but psychological interventions for these groups are rare. This article describes the study protocol for a randomized controlled trial for evaluating the effect of a psychological treatment delivered over the Internet for individuals with hearing problems and concurrent psychological distress. Method: Participants who are significantly distressed will be randomized to either an 8-week Internet-delivered acceptance-based cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e., acceptance and commitment therapy [ACT]), or wait-list control. We aim to include measures of distress associated with hearing difficulties, anxiety, and depression. In addition, we aim to measure acceptance associated with hearing difficulties as well as quality of life. Conclusion: The results of the trial may further our understanding of how to best treat people who present problems with both psychological distress and hearing in using the Internet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123082 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0013 (DOI)000364315200010 ()
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-12
Molander, P., Nordqvist, P., Ellis, R., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Lunner, T. & Andersson, G. (2015). Online administration of a speech in noise test and its relationship to cognition, hearing problems and mental health. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online administration of a speech in noise test and its relationship to cognition, hearing problems and mental health
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Hearing loss is common, but often both undetected and untreated. In this two-part study we evaluated an online hearing test and used this test to explore potential links between hearing status, cognitive abilities, psychological distress as well as quality of life.

Out of a total of 1370 online recruited participants who completed the procedure, 16.2% failed the online hearing test. Hearing difficulties were more prevalent among the older participants. Poor self-rated hearing ability, as measured by the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Handicap, increased the odds ratio for failing the hearing test (OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.74-3.15). The same was true for scoring above the cut-off score of 11 on the anxiety subscale on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (OR 2.55, 95 % CI 1.22-5.33). On the other hand, good performance on the cognitive tasks lowered the risk for a failed hearing test.

We conclude that online hearing tests may have the potential to reduce the time lag between noticing hearing difficulties and beginning a process to address the problem. Moreover, online data collection facilitate large scale investigations on the links between hearing, cognition and perceived communication and mental health problems.

National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123281 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17
Ellis, R., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2015). Predicting speech-in-noise perception using the trail making task: Results from a large-scale internet study. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting speech-in-noise perception using the trail making task: Results from a large-scale internet study
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task. Computerised versions of the tests were completed, via the internet, by a large (1500+) sample of listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old, both with and without hearing loss. The results show that better performance on both the simple and complex versions of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. The findings suggest that the relation between performance in the TMT and speech recognition test may be due to the capacity of the TMT to index perceptual speed, as opposed to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123239 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17
Manchaiah, V. K., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2014). The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study. BMJ Open, 4(e004066)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study
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2014 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no e004066Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective This study developed the Hearing Disability Acceptance Questionnaire (HDAQ) and tested its construct and concurrent validities.

Design Cross-sectional.

Participants A total of 90 participants who were experiencing hearing difficulties were recruited in the UK.

Outcome measures The HDAQ was developed based on the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ). Participants completed self-report measures regarding hearing disability acceptance, hearing disability, symptoms of anxiety and depression and a measure of stages of change.

Results The HDAQ has a two-factor structure that explains 75.69% of its variance. The factors identified were activity engagement and avoidance and suppression. The scale showed a sufficient internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.86). The HDAQ also had acceptable concurrent validity with regard to self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression and readiness to change measures.

Conclusions Acceptance is likely an important aspect of coping with chronic health conditions. To our knowledge, no previously published and validated scale measures the acceptance of hearing disability; therefore, the HDAQ might be useful in future research. However, the role of acceptance in adjusting to hearing disability must be further investigated

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Open, 2014
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102999 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004066 (DOI)000337363700020 ()
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Hesser, H., Molander, P., Jungermann, M. & Andersson, G. (2013). Costs of Suppressing Emotional Sound and Countereffects of a Mindfulness Induction: An Experimental Analog of Tinnitus Impact. PLoS ONE, 8(5), e64540
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Costs of Suppressing Emotional Sound and Countereffects of a Mindfulness Induction: An Experimental Analog of Tinnitus Impact
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 5, p. e64540-Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Tinnitus is the experience of sounds without an appropriate external auditory source. These auditory sensations are intertwined with emotional and attentional processing. Drawing on theories of mental control, we predicted that suppressing an affectively negative sound mimicking the psychoacoustic features of tinnitus would result in decreased persistence in a mentally challenging task (mental arithmetic) that required participants to ignore the same sound, but that receiving a mindfulness exercise would reduce this effect. Normal hearing participants (N = 119) were instructed to suppress an affectively negative sound under cognitive load or were given no such instructions. Next, participants received either a mindfulness induction or an attention control task. Finally, all participants worked with mental arithmetic while exposed to the same sound. The length of time participants could persist in the second task served as the dependent variable. As hypothesized, results indicated that an auditory suppression rationale reduced time of persistence relative to no such rationale, and that a mindfulness induction counteracted this detrimental effect. The study may offer new insights into the mechanisms involved in the development of tinnitus interference. Implications are also discussed in the broader context of attention control strategies and the effects of emotional sound on task performance. The ironic processes of mental control may have an analog in the experience of sounds.

Keywords
Mental control, tinnitus, emotional sound, mindfulness, suppression
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88337 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0064540 (DOI)000318852400071 ()
Note

On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

Available from: 2013-02-03 Created: 2013-02-03 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Molander, P., Nordqvist, P., Öberg, M., Lunner, T., Lyxell, B. & Andersson, G. (2013). Internet-based hearing screening using speech-in-noise: validation and comparisons of self-reported hearing problems, quality of life and phonological representation. BMJ Open, 3(9), 3223
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-based hearing screening using speech-in-noise: validation and comparisons of self-reported hearing problems, quality of life and phonological representation
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2013 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3223-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives For the last decade a host of different projects have been launched to allow persons who are concerned about their hearing status to quickly and at a low cost test their hearing ability. Most often, this is carried out without collecting complementary information that could be correlated with hearing impairment. In this two-part study we first, present the development and validation of a novel Internet-based hearing test, and second, report on the associations between this test and phonological representation, quality of life and self-reported hearing difficulties.

Design Cross-sectional study.

Setting An opportunity sample of participants was recruited at the Stockholm central station for the first study. All parts of the second study were conducted via the Internet, with testing and self-report forms adapted for online use.

Participants The first part of the study was carried out in direct contact with the participants, and participants from the second study were recruited by means of advertisements in newspapers and on webpages. The only exclusion criterion was that participants had to be over 18 years old. Most participants were between 60 and 69 years old. There were almost an equal number of men and women (total n=316).

Outcome measures 48 participants failed the Internet-based hearing screening test. The group failing the test reported more problems on the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Disability. In addition, they were found to have diminished phonological representational skills. However, no difference in quality of life was found.

Conclusions Almost one in five participants was in need of contacting their local hearing clinic. This group had more complaints regarding tinnitus and hyperacusis, rated their own hearing as worse than those who passed, and had a poorer capability of generating accurate phonological representations. This study suggests that it is feasible to screen for hearing status online, and obtain valid data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Open, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100529 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003223 (DOI)000330541900030 ()24041846 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-11-08 Created: 2013-11-08 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Ellis, R., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2013). Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study. In: : . Paper presented at Aging and Speech Communication:5th Interdisciplinary International Research Conference Indiana University, Bloomington, USA, October 6-9, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study
Show others...
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103145 (URN)
Conference
Aging and Speech Communication:5th Interdisciplinary International Research Conference Indiana University, Bloomington, USA, October 6-9, 2013
Available from: 2014-01-13 Created: 2014-01-13 Last updated: 2018-08-02
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