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Ellis, Rachel J.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Håkan, H., Johansson, B., Magnusson, L., Lyxell, B. & Ellis, R. J. (2017). Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 60(9), 2752-2763
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 2752-2763Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine the relation between speech recognition and cognitive skills in bimodal cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid users.

Method: Seventeen bimodal CI users (28-74 years) were recruited to the study. Speech recognition tests were carried out in quiet and in noise. The cognitive tests employed included the Reading Span Test and the Trail Making Test (Daneman & Carpenter, 1980; Reitan, 1958, 1992), measuring working memory capacity and processing speed and executive functioning, respectively. Data were analyzed using paired-sample t tests, Pearson correlations, and partial correlations controlling for age.

Results: The results indicate that performance on some cognitive tests predicts speech recognition and that bimodal listening generates a significant improvement in speech in quiet compared to unilateral CI listening. However, the current results also suggest that bimodal listening requires different cognitive skills than does unimodal CI listening. This is likely to relate to the relative difficulty of having to integrate 2 different signals and then map the integrated signal to representations stored in the long-term memory.

Conclusions: Even though participants obtained speech recognition benefit from bimodal listening, the results suggest that processing bimodal stimuli involves different cognitive skills than does unimodal conditions in quiet. Thus, clinically, it is important to consider this when assessing treatment outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2017
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140999 (URN)10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0276 (DOI)000411478200028 ()28885638 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Ellis, R., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2016). Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study. Ear and Hearing, 37(1), 73-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task.

Design: Data were taken from a sample of 1509 listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old. Participants completed computerized versions of the TMT and an adaptive speech-in-noise recognition test. All testing was conducted via the internet.

Results: The results indicate that better performance on both the simple and complex subtests of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. Thirty-eight percent of the participants had scores on the speech-in-noise test that indicated the presence of a hearing loss.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that the TMT may be a useful tool in the assessment, and possibly the treatment, of speech-recognition difficulties. The results indicate that the relation between speech-in-noise recognition and TMT performance relates both to the capacity of the TMT to index processing speed and to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keywords
Cognition, Internet screening, Speech-in-noise perception, Trail making test
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123218 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000218 (DOI)000367343400008 ()26317162 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (Forte) [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Ellis, R. & Munro, K. J. (2015). Benefit from, and acclimatization to, frequency compression hearing aids in experienced adult hearing-aid users. International Journal of Audiology, 54(1), 37-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benefit from, and acclimatization to, frequency compression hearing aids in experienced adult hearing-aid users
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim was to investigate whether frequency compression (FC) hearing aids provide additional benefit to that conferred by conventional amplification. Design: Participants wore the same hearing aid with FC enabled and disabled for six weeks (ABA design) in each condition. Speech recognition tests (in both quiet and in noise) were administered alongside two questionnaires. Performance was compared across the two signal processing conditions and at different time points. Study sample: Twelve experienced hearing-aid users (aged 65-84 years old) with moderate-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss participated in the study. Results: FC resulted in statistically significantly higher mean scores in all of the administered speech tests. Improvements over time were limited to high frequency phoneme perception. No effect of FC on self-report outcomes was observed. Conclusions: FC may lead to significant improvements in speech perception outcomes in both quiet and noise for many individuals. No participant was significantly disadvantaged by the use of FC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Frequency compression; auditory acclimatization; speech perception; cognition; sensorineural hearing loss
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113490 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.948217 (DOI)000346468200005 ()25470620 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|ESRC CASE PhD studentship

Available from: 2015-01-19 Created: 2015-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Ellis, R. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). How does susceptibility to proactive interference relate to speech recognition in aided and unaided conditions?. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(1017)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does susceptibility to proactive interference relate to speech recognition in aided and unaided conditions?
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, no 1017Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Proactive interference (PI) is the capacity to resist interference to the acquisition of new memories from information stored in the long-term memory. Previous research has shown that PI correlates significantly with the speech-in-noise recognition scores of younger adults with normal hearing. In this study, we report the results of an experiment designed to investigate the extent to which tests of visual PI relate to the speech-in-noise recognition scores of older adults with hearing loss, in aided and unaided conditions. The results suggest that measures of PI correlate significantly with speech-in-noise recognition only in the unaided condition. Furthermore the relation between PI and speech-in-noise recognition differs to that observed in younger listeners without hearing loss. The findings suggest that the relation between PI tests and the speech-in-noise recognition scores of older adults with hearing loss relates to capability of the test to index cognitive flexibility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2015
Keywords
cognition; speech-in-noise recognition; proactive interference; working memory; executive function; sensorineural hearing loss; hearing aids; older adults
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121111 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01017 (DOI)000359788500001 ()26283981 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Linnaeus Centre HEAD; Swedish Research Council [2007-8654]

Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Ellis, R. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Interaction in communication: Elderspeak and hearing aid visibility. In: : . Paper presented at Ageing and speech Communication, Bloomington, Indiana, 11-14 October, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction in communication: Elderspeak and hearing aid visibility
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123387 (URN)
Conference
Ageing and speech Communication, Bloomington, Indiana, 11-14 October, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Molander, P., Nordqvist, P., Ellis, R., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Lunner, T. & Andersson, G. (2015). Online administration of a speech in noise test and its relationship to cognition, hearing problems and mental health. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online administration of a speech in noise test and its relationship to cognition, hearing problems and mental health
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Hearing loss is common, but often both undetected and untreated. In this two-part study we evaluated an online hearing test and used this test to explore potential links between hearing status, cognitive abilities, psychological distress as well as quality of life.

Out of a total of 1370 online recruited participants who completed the procedure, 16.2% failed the online hearing test. Hearing difficulties were more prevalent among the older participants. Poor self-rated hearing ability, as measured by the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Handicap, increased the odds ratio for failing the hearing test (OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.74-3.15). The same was true for scoring above the cut-off score of 11 on the anxiety subscale on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (OR 2.55, 95 % CI 1.22-5.33). On the other hand, good performance on the cognitive tasks lowered the risk for a failed hearing test.

We conclude that online hearing tests may have the potential to reduce the time lag between noticing hearing difficulties and beginning a process to address the problem. Moreover, online data collection facilitate large scale investigations on the links between hearing, cognition and perceived communication and mental health problems.

National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123281 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17
Ellis, R., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2015). Predicting speech-in-noise perception using the trail making task: Results from a large-scale internet study. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting speech-in-noise perception using the trail making task: Results from a large-scale internet study
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task. Computerised versions of the tests were completed, via the internet, by a large (1500+) sample of listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old, both with and without hearing loss. The results show that better performance on both the simple and complex versions of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. The findings suggest that the relation between performance in the TMT and speech recognition test may be due to the capacity of the TMT to index perceptual speed, as opposed to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123239 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-17
Ellis, R. J. & Munro, K. J. (2015). Predictors of aided speech recognition, with and without frequency compression, in older adults.. International Journal of Audiology, 54(7), 467-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of aided speech recognition, with and without frequency compression, in older adults.
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 467-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim was to investigate whether cognitive and/or audiological measures predict aided speech recognition, both with and without frequency compression (FC).

DESIGN: Participants wore hearing aids, with and without FC for a total of 12 weeks (six weeks in each signal processing condition, ABA design). Performance on a sentence-in-noise recognition test was assessed at the end of each six-week period. Audiological (severity of high frequency hearing loss, presence of dead regions) and cognitive (reading span and trail making test scores) measures were obtained and assessed as predictors of sentence-in-noise recognition with and without FC enabled.

STUDY SAMPLE: Twelve experienced hearing-aid users (aged 65-84 years old) with moderate-to-severe high-frequency hearing loss took part in the study.

RESULTS: The results suggest that both auditory and cognitive factors can be predictive of sentence-in-noise recognition with conventional amplification. However, only auditory factors were significantly correlated with the degree of benefit obtained from FC.

CONCLUSIONS: The strongest predictor of aided speech recognition, both with and without FC, was high frequency hearing loss. Cognitive performance was also a predictor of benefit from conventional amplification, but not of additional benefit from the use of FC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121043 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.996825 (DOI)000359996600005 ()25751599 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Ellis, R. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Cognition and Speech-In-Noise Recognition: The Role of Proactive Interference. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF AUDIOLOGY, 25(10), 975-982
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition and Speech-In-Noise Recognition: The Role of Proactive Interference
2014 (English)In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 975-982Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Complex working memory (WM) span tasks have been shown to predict speech-in-noise (SIN) recognition. Studies of complex WM span tasks suggest that, rather than indexing a single cognitive process, performance on such tasks may be governed by separate cognitive subprocesses embedded within WM. Previous research has suggested that one such subprocess indexed by WM tasks is proactive interference (PI), which refers to difficulties memorizing current information because of interference from previously stored long-term memory representations for similar information. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate phonological PI and to examine the relationship between PI (semantic and phonological) and SIN perception. Research Design: A within-subjects experimental design was used. Study Sample: An opportunity sample of 24 young listeners with normal hearing was recruited. Data Collection and Analysis: Measures of resistance to, and release from, semantic and phonological PI were calculated alongside the signal-to-noise ratio required to identify 50% of keywords correctly in a SIN recognition task. The data were analyzed using t-tests and correlations. Results: Evidence of release from and resistance to semantic interference was observed. These measures correlated significantly with SIN recognition. Limited evidence of phonological PI was observed. Conclusions: The results show that capacity to resist semantic PI can be used to predict SIN recognition scores in young listeners with normal hearing. On the basis of these findings, future research will focus on investigating whether tests of PI can be used in the treatment and/or rehabilitation of hearing loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Academy of Audiology, 2014
Keywords
Cognition; executive function; proactive interference; speech-in-noise recognition; working memory
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113376 (URN)10.3766/jaaa.25.10.6 (DOI)000346461400006 ()25514450 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Research Council [2007-8654]

Available from: 2015-01-16 Created: 2015-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Ellis, R. J. & Munro, K. J. (2013). Does cognitive function predict frequency compressed speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and normal cognition?. International Journal of Audiology, 52(1), 14-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does cognitive function predict frequency compressed speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and normal cognition?
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 14-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective:The aim was to investigate the relationship between cognitive ability and frequency compressed speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and normal cognition. Design:Speech-in-noise recognition was measured using Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers sentences presented over earphones at 65 dB SPL and a range of signal-to-noise ratios. There were three conditions:unprocessed, and at frequency compression ratios of 2:1 and 3:1 (cut-off frequency, 1.6 kHz). Working memory and cognitive ability were measured using the reading span test and the trail making test, respectively. Study sample:Participants were 15 young normally-hearing adults with normal cognition. Results:There was a statistically significant reduction in mean speech recognition from around 80% when unprocessed to 40% for 2:1 compression and 30% for 3:1 compression. There was a statistically significant relationship between speech recognition and cognition for the unprocessed condition but not for the frequency-compressed conditions. Conclusions:The relationship between cognitive functioning and recognition of frequency compressed speech-in-noise was not statistically significant. The findings may have been different if the participants had been provided with training and/or time to acclimatize to the frequency-compressed conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2013
Keywords
Frequency compression, cognition, speech-in-noise, trail making test, reading span test
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90768 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2012.721013 (DOI)000312223800003 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|ESRC CASE||Phonak AG||

Available from: 2013-04-05 Created: 2013-04-05 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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