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Zetterqvist, Maria
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Aspeqvist, E., Andersson, H., Korhonen, L., Dahlström, Ö. & Zetterqvist, M. (2024). Measurement and stratification of nonsuicidal self-injury in adolescents. BMC Psychiatry, 24(1), Article ID 107.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement and stratification of nonsuicidal self-injury in adolescents
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2024 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundNonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent in adolescents. In survey and interview studies assessing NSSI, methods of assessment have been shown to influence prevalence estimates. However, knowledge of which groups of adolescents that are identified with different measurement methods is lacking, and the characteristics of identified groups are yet to be investigated. Further, only a handful of studies have been carried out using exploratory methods to identify subgroups among adolescents with NSSI.MethodsThe performance of two prevalence measures (single-item vs. behavioral checklist) in the same cross-sectional community sample (n = 266, age M = 14.21, 58.3% female) of adolescents was compared regarding prevalence estimates and also characterization of the identified groups with lifetime NSSI prevalence. A cluster analysis was carried out in the same sample. Identified clusters were compared to the two groups defined using the prevalence measures.ResultsA total of 118 (44.4%) participants acknowledged having engaged in NSSI at least once. Of these, a group of 55 (20.7%) adolescents confirmed NSSI on a single item and 63 (23.7%) adolescents confirmed NSSI only on a behavioral checklist, while denying NSSI on the single item. Groups differed significantly, with the single-item group being more severely affected and having higher mean scores on difficulties in emotion regulation, self-criticism, number of methods, higher frequency of NSSI, higher rates of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior and lower mean score on health-related quality of life. All cases with higher severity were not identified by the single-item question. Cluster analysis identified three clusters, two of which fit well with the groups identified by single-item and behavioral checklist measures.ConclusionsWhen investigating NSSI prevalence in adolescents, findings are influenced by the researchers' choice of measures. The present study provides some directions toward what kind of influence to expect given the type of measure used, both with regards to the size of the identified group and its composition. Implications for future research as well as clinical and preventive work are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2024
Keywords
Nonsuicidal self-injury; Adolescence; Community sample; Measurement; Cluster analysis
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-200907 (URN)10.1186/s12888-024-05535-3 (DOI)001158455100002 ()38326791 (PubMedID)
Funder
Linköpings universitet
Note

Funding: Linköping University

Available from: 2024-02-17 Created: 2024-02-17 Last updated: 2024-02-23
Zetterqvist, M. & Bjureberg, J. (2023). Social Processes in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury. In: Elizabeth E. Lloyd-Richardson; Imke Baetens; Janis L. Whitlock (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: . Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Processes in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury
2023 (English)In: The Oxford Handbook of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury / [ed] Elizabeth E. Lloyd-Richardson; Imke Baetens; Janis L. Whitlock, Oxford University Press, 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Social interactions are critical for the health and well-being of all group-living primates, including humans, across the lifespan. Social stressors, such as perceived criticism and rejection, are common triggers of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Social processes may thus have a central role in the etiology and maintenance of NSSI. Using the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework for systems for social processes, the chapter presents recent findings on NSSI, mapping them onto the four constructs: affiliation and attachment, social communication, perception and understanding of self, and perception and understanding of others. The chapter also discusses available research related to NSSI for the respective units of analysis (genes and molecules, physiology, neurocircuitry, behavior, and self-report), focusing on the effects of social exclusion, rejection sensitivity, and negative social bias. The chapter also includes an overview of overlapping features related to social exclusion and rejection sensitivity between NSSI and borderline personality disorder, a condition characterized by interpersonal difficulties. This chapter provides an account of evidence-based assessment and intervention areas of social processes in NSSI together with recommendations and future directions. The chapter concludes that social processes are relevant to NSSI across the RDoC constructs and units of analyses. Social difficulties, social problem-solving, and experiences and interpretations of social situations need to be included in the conceptualization of how NSSI is developed and maintained and ultimately assessed and treated. In an effort to bring such conceptualization to life, a case example illustrates how an understanding of social processes may guide assessment and treatment of NSSI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Series
Oxford Library of Psychology Series
Keywords
nonsuicidal self-injury, Research Domain Criteria, social processes, social stressors, units of analysis, assessment, intervention
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-201796 (URN)10.1093/oxfordhb/9780197611272.013.17 (DOI)9780197611302 (ISBN)9780197611272 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-03-22 Created: 2024-03-22 Last updated: 2024-03-22
Holmqvist Larsson, K., Lowen, A., Hellerstedt, L., Bergcrona, L., Salerud, M. & Zetterqvist, M. (2020). Emotion regulation group skills training: a pilot study of an add-on treatment for eating disorders in a clinical setting. Journal of Eating Disorders, 8(1), Article ID 12.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion regulation group skills training: a pilot study of an add-on treatment for eating disorders in a clinical setting
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Emotion regulation difficulties appear to play a role in the development and maintenance of several eating disorders. This pilot study aimed at examining whether a short add-on group skills training in emotion regulation for young adults with different eating disorders was feasible in a psychiatric clinical setting. We also investigated if the treatment increased knowledge of emotions, and decreased self-reported difficulties with emotion regulation, alexithymia, symptoms of eating disorder, anxiety and depression, as well as clinical impairment. Methods Six skills training groups were piloted with a total of 29 participants (M = 21.41 years, SD = 1.92). The treatment consisted of five sessions dealing with psychoeducation about emotions and emotion regulation skills training. Paired samples t-test was used to compare differences between before-and-after measures. Results The primary outcomes measures difficulties in emotion regulation (p < 0.001) and alexithymia (p < 0.001) showed significant improvement after treatment. The total eating disorder score (p = 0.009) was also significantly reduced, as was clinical impairment (p < 0.001). Acceptance/valued direction, identifying primary emotions and learning about secondary emotions was rated as especially helpful. Conclusions This preliminary pilot study showed that group training targeting emotion regulation skills was feasible and appreciated by participants, as well as being potentially promising as an adjunctive treatment for different eating disorders. Further controlled studies are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2020
Keywords
Emotion-regulation; Skills; Eating disorders; Treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-165167 (URN)10.1186/s40337-020-00289-1 (DOI)000523504800001 ()32266070 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-04-17 Created: 2020-04-17 Last updated: 2022-02-10
Holmqvist Larsson, K., Andersson, G., Stern, H. & Zetterqvist, M. (2020). Emotion regulation group skills training for adolescents and parents: A pilot study of an add-on treatment in a clinical setting. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 25(1), 141-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion regulation group skills training for adolescents and parents: A pilot study of an add-on treatment in a clinical setting
2020 (English)In: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-1045, E-ISSN 1461-7021, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 141-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Difficulties with emotion regulation have been identified as an underlying mechanism in mental health. This pilot study aimed at examining whether group skills training in emotion regulation for adolescents and parents as an add-on intervention was feasible in an outpatient child and adolescent psychiatric clinic. We also investigated if the treatment increased knowledge and awareness of emotions and their functions, increased emotion regulation skills and decreased self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression. Six skills training groups were piloted with a total of 20 adolescents and 21 adults. The treatment consisted of five sessions dealing with psychoeducation about emotions and emotion regulation skills training. Paired-samples t test was used to compare differences between before-and-after measures for adolescents and parents separately. The primary outcome measure, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, showed significant improvement after treatment for both adolescents and parents. For adolescents, measures of alexithymia were significantly reduced. Also, emotional awareness was significantly increased. Measures of depression and anxiety did not change. In conclusion, group skills training as an add-on treatment can be feasible and effective but further studies are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Emotion regulation; skills training; adolescents; treatment; group
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160430 (URN)10.1177/1359104519869782 (DOI)000483213500001 ()31419914 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071517722 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2021-04-25Bibliographically approved
Zetterqvist, M., Perini, I., Mayo, L. & Gustafsson, P. A. (2020). Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Disorder in Adolescents: Clinical Utility of the Diagnosis Using the Clinical Assessment of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Disorder Index. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 11, Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Disorder in Adolescents: Clinical Utility of the Diagnosis Using the Clinical Assessment of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Disorder Index
2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 11, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nonsuicidal self-injury disorder (NSSID) is a condition in need of further study, especially in adolescent and clinical populations where it is particularly prevalent and studies are limited. Twenty-nine clinical self-injuring adolescents were included in the study. The Clinical Assessment of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Disorder Index (CANDI) was used to assess prevalence of NSSID. The NSSID diagnosis criteria were met by 62.1% of adolescents. The impairment or distress criterion was least often met. Criteria B and C (assessing reasons for NSSI and cognitions/emotions prior to NSSI) were confirmed by 96-100% of all participants. Adolescents with NSSI in this clinical sample had several comorbidities and high levels of psychopathology. NSSID occurred both in combination with and independently of borderline personality disorder traits as well as suicide plans and attempts. Those with NSSID had a significantly higher cutting frequency than those not meeting full NSSID criteria. Other NSSI characteristics, comorbidity, psychopathology, and trauma experiences did not differ between groups. CANDI was a feasible tool to assess NSSID in adolescents. It is important to use structured measures to assess the validity of the NSSID diagnosis across development in both community and clinical samples. The clinical utility of the NSSID diagnosis is discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2020
Keywords
nonsuicidal self-injury; disorder; adolescents; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; diagnosis
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164670 (URN)10.3389/fpsyt.2020.00008 (DOI)000517544800001 ()32116833 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council [538-2013-7434]; ALF Grants, Ostergotland County [LIO-535931, LIO-520131]

Available from: 2020-03-29 Created: 2020-03-29 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Berg, M., Rozental, A., de Brun Mangs, J., Näsman, M., Strömberg, K., Viberg, L., . . . Andersson, G. (2020). The Role of Learning Support and Chat-Sessions in Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Anxiety: A Factorial Design Study. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 11, Article ID 503.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Learning Support and Chat-Sessions in Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents With Anxiety: A Factorial Design Study
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2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 11, article id 503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Increased awareness of anxiety in adolescents emphasises the need for effective interventions. Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) could be a resource-effective and evidence-based treatment option, but little is known about how to optimize ICBT or which factors boost outcomes. Recently, the role of knowledge in psychotherapy has received increased focus. Further, chat-sessions are of interest when trying to optimize ICBT for youths. This study aimed to evaluate the role of learning support and chat-sessions during ICBT for adolescent anxiety, using a factorial design. Method A total of 120 adolescents were randomised to one of four treatment groups, in a 2x2 design with two factors: with or without learning support and/or chat-sessions. Results Anxiety and depressive symptoms were reduced (Beck Anxiety Inventory- BAI; Cohensd=0.72; Beck Depression Inventory- BDI;d=0.97). There was a main effect of learning support on BAI (d=0.38), and learning support increased knowledge gain (d =0.42). There were no main effects or interactions related to the chat-sessions. Treatment effects were maintained at 6-months, but the added effect of learning support had by then vanished. Conclusion ICBT can be an effective alternative when treating adolescents with anxiety. Learning support could be of importance to enhance short-term treatment effects, and should be investigated further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2020
Keywords
internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy; adolescents; anxiety; learning support; chat-sessions
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-167672 (URN)10.3389/fpsyt.2020.00503 (DOI)000543886300001 ()32587533 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087028862 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University; Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences [P160883:1]; (Swedish Central Bank)

Available from: 2020-07-20 Created: 2020-07-20 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Zetterqvist, M., Hanell, H. E., Wadsby, M., Cocozza, M. & Gustafsson, P. (2020). Validation of the Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15) self-report questionnaire: index of family functioning and change in Swedish families. Journal of Family Therapy, 42(1), 129-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation (SCORE-15) self-report questionnaire: index of family functioning and change in Swedish families
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Family Therapy, ISSN 0163-4445, E-ISSN 1467-6427, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Instruments for evaluating the progress and outcome of systemic therapeutic treatments in clinical practice need to be easily administered and have sound psychometric properties. The Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation, 15-item version (SCORE-15), is a self-report instrument that measures aspects of family functioning. This study investigates the psychometric qualities of a Swedish version of SCORE-15. Seventy Swedish families with healthy children and 159 families with children with psychiatric or behavioural problems were included in the study, resulting in a total of 397 individuals. Results showed that SCORE-15 differentiated clinical from non-clinical families with acceptable psychometric properties for test-retest, internal consistency, convergent and construct validity, as well as sensitivity to change for the clinical sample. The three-factor solution of strengths, difficulties and communication was tested. Results imply preliminary psychometric support for the use of the Swedish version of SCORE-15 to evaluate progress and outcome in clinical practice. Practitioner points SCORE-15 is an easily administered questionnaire suitable for use in clinical practice to evaluate systemic therapeutic progress and outcome The Swedish version of SCORE-15 has acceptable psychometric properties

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2020
Keywords
factor analysis; outcome measure; reliability; SCORE-15; validation
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163364 (URN)10.1111/1467-6427.12255 (DOI)000506859700009 ()
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2021-10-04
Jonsson, L., Svedin, C. G., Pribe, G., Fredlund, C., Wadsby, M. & Zetterqvist, M. (2019). Similarities and differences in the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI). Journal of Suicide and Life-threatening Behaviour (1), 120-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Similarities and differences in the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI)
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Suicide and Life-threatening Behaviour, ISSN 0363-0234, E-ISSN 1943-278X, no 1, p. 120-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Differences and similarities were studied in the functions of two different self-injurious behaviors (SIB): nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI). Based on type of SIB reported, adolescents were classified in one of three groups: NSSI only (n = 910), SASI only (n = 41), and both NSSI and SASI (n = 76). There was support for functional equivalence in the two forms of SIB, with automatic functions being most commonly endorsed in all three groups. There were also functional differences, with adolescents in the SASI only group reporting more social influence functions than those with NSSI only. Adolescents reporting both NSSI and SASI endorsed the highest number of functions for both behaviors. Clinical implications are discussed, emphasizing the need for emotion regulation skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144486 (URN)10.1111/sltb.12417 (DOI)000459870900009 ()29073344 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85032291097 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-24 Created: 2018-01-24 Last updated: 2021-05-18Bibliographically approved
Topooco, N., Berg, M., Johansson, S., Liljethörn, L., Radvogin, E., Vlaescu, G., . . . Andersson, G. (2018). Chat- and internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy in treatment of adolescent depression: randomised controlled trial. Bjpsych Open, 4(4), 199-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chat- and internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy in treatment of adolescent depression: randomised controlled trial
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2018 (English)In: Bjpsych Open, ISSN 2056-4724, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 199-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Depression is a major contributor to the burden of disease in the adolescent population. Internet-based interventions can increase access to treatment.

Aims

To evaluate the efficacy of internet-based cognitive–behavioural therapy (iCBT), including therapist chat communication, in treatment of adolescent depression.

Method

Seventy adolescents, 15–19 years of age and presenting with depressive symptoms, were randomised to iCBT or attention control. The primary outcome was the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II).

Results

Significant reductions in depressive symptoms were found, favouring iCBT over the control condition (F(1,67) = 6.18, P < 0.05). The between-group effect size was Cohen's d = 0.71 (95% CI 0.22–1.19). A significantly higher proportion of iCBT participants (42.4%) than controls (13.5%) showed a 50% decrease in BDI-II score post-treatment (P < 0.01). The improvement for the iCBT group was maintained at 6 months.

Conclusions

The intervention appears to effectively reduce symptoms of depression in adolescents and may be helpful in overcoming barriers to care among young people.

Declaration of interest

N.T. and G.A. designed the programme. N.T. authored the treatment material. The web platform used for treatment is owned by Linköping University and run on a non-for-profit basis. None of the authors receives any income from the programme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
Cognitive–behavioural therapy, blended treatment, adolescent, depression, treatment gap, stigma, internet-based treatment, internet-supported, digital, iCBT
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149803 (URN)10.1192/bjo.2018.18 (DOI)000436934800006 ()29988969 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-25 Created: 2018-07-25 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Zetterqvist, M., Svedin, C. G., Fredlund, C., Priebe, G., Wadsby, M. & Jonsson, L. (2018). Self-reported nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI): Relationship to abuse, risk behaviors, trauma symptoms, self-esteem and attachment. Psychiatry Research, 265, 309-316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and sex as self-injury (SASI): Relationship to abuse, risk behaviors, trauma symptoms, self-esteem and attachment
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2018 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 265, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study focuses on a conceptually unexplored behavior among adolescents who report deliberately using sex as a means of self-injury. In a large high school-based sample (n = 5743), adolescents who engaged in sex as self injury (SASI, n = 43) were compared to adolescents who reported direct nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI, n = 933) and those who reported both NSSI and SASI (n = 82). Re.sults showed that significantly more adolescents with SASI had experience of penetrating sexual abuse, as well as more sexual partners compared to those with NSSI. The SASI group also had higher levels of self-reported trauma symptoms, such as dissociation, posttraumatic stress and sexual concerns compared to those with NSSI, suggesting a distinct relationship between sexual abuse, trauma symptoms and engaging in sex as self-injury. There was no difference between the SASI and NSSI groups regarding experiences of emotional and physical abuse, self-esteem, parental care or overprotection or symptoms of depression, anxiety and anger. Adolescents who engaged in both NSSI + SASI stood out as a more severe and burdened group, with more experience of abuse, risk behaviors and impaired psychosocial health. Adolescents with traumatic experiences such as sexual abuse need to be assessed for SASI and vice versa.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2018
Keywords
Nonsuicidal self-injury; Sex as self-injury; Adolescents; Sexual abuse
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149468 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2018.05.013 (DOI)000435428300047 ()29778052 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-05 Created: 2018-07-05 Last updated: 2019-05-01
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