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Radomska, M. (2018). Promises of Non/Living Monsters and Uncontainable Life. Somatechnics, 8(2), 215-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promises of Non/Living Monsters and Uncontainable Life
2018 (English)In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 215-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the Western cultural imaginaries the monstrous is defined – following Aristotelian categorisations – by its excess, deficiency or displacement of organic matter. These characteristics come to the fore in the field of bioart: a current in contemporary art that involves the use of biological materials (various kinds of soma: cells, tissues, organisms), and scientific procedures, technologies, protocols, and tools. Bioartistic projects and objects not only challenge the conventional ideas of embodiment and bodily boundaries, but also explore the relation between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, human and nonhuman, as well as various thresholds of the living.

By looking at select bioartworks, this paper argues that the analysed projects offer a different ontology of life. More specifically, they expose life as uncontainable, that is, as a power of differentiation that traverses the divide between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, human and nonhuman, and, ultimately, life and death. In this way, they draw attention to excess, processuality and multiplicity at the very core of life itself. Thus understood, life always already surpasses preconceived material and conceptual limits.

Finally, while taking Deleuzian feminisms and new materialism as its theoretical ground, the paper suggests that such a revision of the ontology of life may mobilise future conceptualisations of ethics that evade the anthropocentric logic dominant in the humanities and social sciences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh University Press, 2018
Keywords
The non/living, bioart, ethics, ontology of life, Deleuzian feminisms, the monstrous
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151857 (URN)10.3366/soma.2018.0252 (DOI)000444771000007 ()
Available from: 2018-10-06 Created: 2018-10-06 Last updated: 2019-03-18Bibliographically approved
Radomska, M. (2017). Non/living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Technoecologies of Bioart. Australian feminist studies (Print), 32(94), 377-394
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non/living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Technoecologies of Bioart
2017 (English)In: Australian feminist studies (Print), ISSN 0816-4649, E-ISSN 1465-3303, Vol. 32, no 94, p. 377-394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bioart is a form of hybrid artistico-scientific practices in contemporary art that involve the use of bio-materials (such as living cells, tissues, organisms) and scientific techniques, protocols, and tools. Bioart-works embody vulnerability (intrinsic to all beings) and depend on (bio)technologies that allow these creations to come into being, endure and flourish but also discipline them. This article focuses on ‘semi-living’ sculptures by The Tissue Culture and Art Project (TC&A). TC&A’s artworks consist of bioengineered mammal tissues grown over biopolymer scaffoldings of different shapes and require sterile conditions of a bioreactor and constant care in order to survive. The article explores how bioart-works are always already intertwined with multiple (bio)technologies and techniques of care and labour, forming specific feminist technoecologies that challenge conventional bioscientific and cultural imaginaries of embodiment and the relation between physis and techné. TC&A’s sculptures expose life as the non/living: the processual enmeshment of the organic and inorganic, living and non-living, and growth and decay. The article argues that thinking with and through the feminist technoecologies of bioart mobilises philosophical inventiveness: not only does it problematise the entwinement of technology and biomatter and of culture and nature, but it also prompts us to rethink the ontology of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
bioart, feminist technoecology, the non/living, feminist materialism, radical immanence, The Tissue Culture and Art Project, gender
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147758 (URN)10.1080/08164649.2017.1466649 (DOI)000432145100003 ()
Note

Funding agencies: COST Action IS1307 New Materialism: Networking European Scholarship on How Matter Comes to Matter [COST-STSM-ECOST-STSM-IS1307-270516-078302]

Available from: 2018-05-11 Created: 2018-05-11 Last updated: 2018-06-01Bibliographically approved
Radomska, M. (2016). Uncontainable Life: A Biophilosophy of Bioart. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncontainable Life: A Biophilosophy of Bioart
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Otyglat liv : Biokonst och biofilosofi
Abstract [en]

Uncontainable Life: A Biophilosophy of Bioart investigates the ways in which thinking through the contemporary hybrid artistico-scientific practices of bioart is a biophilosophical practice, one that contributes to a more nuanced understanding of life than we encounter in mainstream academic discourse. When examined from a Deleuzian feminist perspective and in dialogue with contemporary bioscience, bioartistic projects reveal the inadequacy of asking about life’s essence. They expose the enmeshment between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, and, ultimately, life and death. Instead of examining the defining criteria of life, bioartistic practices explore and enact life as processual, differential, and always already uncontainable, thus transcending preconceived material and conceptual boundaries.

In this way, this doctoral thesis concentrates on the ontology of life as it emerges through the selected bioartworks: “semi-living” sculptures created by The Tissue Culture and Art Project and the performance May the Horse Live in Me (2011) by L’Art Orienté Objet. The hope is that such an ontology can enable future conceptualisations of an ethico-politics that avoids the anthropocentric logic dominant in the humanities and social sciences.

Abstract [sv]

Otyglat liv: Biokonst och biofilosofi undersöker hur biofilosofisk praktik och biokonst, alltså tänkande genom samtida hybrida konstnärliga-vetenskapliga praktiker, kan bidra till en mer nyanserad förståelse av liv än vad vi vanligtvis möter i akademiska diskurser. Med utgångspunkt i ett feministiskt deleuzianskt perspektiv, och i dialog med samtida biovetenskap, pekar biokonstnärliga projekt på det otillräckliga i att ställa frågor om livets innehåll. Projekten tydliggör istället hur det levande och det icke-levande, det organiska och oorganiska, precis som liv och död, är sammanflätade. Istället för att sätta upp fasta kriterier för liv undersöker och framställer biokonstnärliga praktiker liv som en differentiell process, i sig omöjlig att fastställa och därmed något otyglat, som överskrider uppsatta gränser mellan det materiella och föreställda.

Följaktligen fokuserar föreliggande avhandling på livets ontologi så som den framträder i ett urval av biokonstnärliga arbeten: ”semi-levande” skulpturer skapade av The Tissue Culture and Art Project, samt performance-konstverket May the Horse Live in Me (2011) av L’Art Orienté Objet. Förhoppningen är att en sådan ontologi kan möjliggöra framtida begreppsliggöranden av en etisk politik som undviker den antropocentriska logik som dominerar humaniora och samhällsvetenskap idag.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016. p. 233
Series
Linköping Studies in Arts and Science, ISSN 0282-9800 ; 666
Keywords
Bioart, uncontainable life, the non/living, death, continental philosophy, feminist theory, Deleuze and Guattari studies, posthumanist feminism, critical life studies, animal studies, gender, bioscience, biotechnology, matter, assemblage, affect, human/nonhuman relations., Biokonst, otyglat liv, the non/living, död, kontinental filosofi, feministisk teori, studier av Deleuze och Guattari, posthumanistisk feminism, kritiska livsstudier, djurstudier, genus, biovetenskap, bioteknologi, materia, assemblage, affekt, mänskliga/icke-mänskliga relationer
National Category
Gender Studies Social Anthropology Ethnology Cultural Studies Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126670 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-126670 (DOI)978-91-7685-885-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-04-22, TEMCAS, TEMA-huset, Campus Valla, Linköping, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-04-01 Created: 2016-04-01 Last updated: 2016-06-07Bibliographically approved
Radomska, M. (2015). Entanglements of the Victimless Leather Jacket: Waste, Death, and the Uncontainability of the Living”. In: : . Paper presented at Death and Corpses Mini-Symposium, 23 Fenruary 2015, at Tema Genus, Linköping University. Linköping University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Entanglements of the Victimless Leather Jacket: Waste, Death, and the Uncontainability of the Living”
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the context of bioscience (as much as in the field of bioart) that engages with tissue bioengineering, the life of the cultured cells is closely intertwined with the issues of biohazardous waste, contagion, death, and control (over the manipulated ‘living’). While looking at one of the exhibitions during which Australian bioartists The Tissue Culture & Art Project showed their ‘semi-living’ sculpture the Victimless Leather Jacket, which unexpectedly became contaminated with fungi, I will examine the material-discursive entanglements of the ideas of death, life, and the uncontainability of the latter that are enacted through the bioartwork as well as bioartistic practices in a broader sense.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University: , 2015
Keywords
life, waste, contagion, death, gender, control, bioart
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114695 (URN)
Conference
Death and Corpses Mini-Symposium, 23 Fenruary 2015, at Tema Genus, Linköping University
Note

Event Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/409985222513413

Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-03-02 Last updated: 2015-03-16
Radomska, M. (2015). MacCormack, Patricia (ed.), The Animal Catalyst: Towards Ahuman Theory, Bloomsbury, London and New York, 2014. ISBN: 9781472534446 (Paperback) / 9781472526847 (Cloth), 224 pp., US$ 34.95 (Paperback) / US$ 104 (Cloth). [Review]. Somatechnics, 5(2), 255-258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MacCormack, Patricia (ed.), The Animal Catalyst: Towards Ahuman Theory, Bloomsbury, London and New York, 2014. ISBN: 9781472534446 (Paperback) / 9781472526847 (Cloth), 224 pp., US$ 34.95 (Paperback) / US$ 104 (Cloth).
2015 (English)In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 255-258Article, book review (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh University Press: , 2015
Keywords
animal studies, philosophy, posthumanist ethics, art, critical posthumanism
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121269 (URN)10.3366/soma.2015.0164 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-09-10 Created: 2015-09-10 Last updated: 2015-09-29
Radomska, M. (2015). Machinic Assemblages of the Non/Living: Bioart and Uncontainable Life. In: : . Paper presented at 8th International Deleuze Studies Conference “Daughters of Chaos: Practice, Discipline, A Life” in Stockholm, 29.06-1.07.2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Machinic Assemblages of the Non/Living: Bioart and Uncontainable Life
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Bioart is an increasingly popular current of contemporary art which involves the use of biological (”living”) materials and employment of bioscientific procedures, protocols, and tools. This also means that bioartworks often result from the collaboration between artists and scientists. As any other form of tinkering with life in the frames of wet biology laboratory, bioartistic practices generate waste on a daily basis. It is not only laboratory materials, rubber gloves, or chemical substances that need to be disposed in accordance with lab protocols; the very life itself, the organisms, cells, tissues, bacteria, and all other forms of the living – once they “fulfil the ascribed role” – are to be disposed as well. In the latter case, yet, the “disposal” may also be understood as neutralisation or killing as the organisms cannot be sustained in the lab anymore (“are no longer useful”?), nor can they leave the lab. As the bioartists, Ionat Zurr and Oron Catts (Tissue Culture & Art Project) put it, “when life leaves the lab it is almost always waste”. In their own projects, which do not only consist in growing semi-living sculptures out of tissue cultures seeded on biopolymer scaffoldings of different shapes, but also include the involvement of the audience, TC&A draw attention to this very instrumental position which life itself occupies in the context of contemporary bioscience and technology. At the same time, both their artworks and narratives challenge the popular (transhumanist) discourse on manageability and control over life In this paper I will look at how the concept of the disposable/waste, which is increasingly problematised not only within environmental science, but also philosophy, sociology and cultural studies, may allow for a problematisation of life and the living entwined in the procedures constitutive of a bioartistic laboratory. Furthermore, whilst concentrating on the intertwinement between human and nonhuman, organic and inorganic, living and non-living that all fall into the category of “life”, I will introduce the concept of the non/living as a more adequate and fruitful way of approaching this dynamic assemblage. Finally, I will inquire about possible ways in which the assemblage of the non/living may enable a rethinking of ethics in a non-anthropocentric manner.

Keywords
life, bioart, waste, uncontainability, gender
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120920 (URN)
Conference
8th International Deleuze Studies Conference “Daughters of Chaos: Practice, Discipline, A Life” in Stockholm, 29.06-1.07.2015
Available from: 2015-08-31 Created: 2015-08-31 Last updated: 2015-09-04
Radomska, M. & Henriksen, L. (2015). Missing Links and Non/Human Queerings: an Introduction. Somatechnics, 5(2), 113-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Missing Links and Non/Human Queerings: an Introduction
2015 (English)In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, questions regarding the ontological status of the human have been raised with renewed interest and imagination within various fields of critical thought. In the face of biotechnological findings and increasingly advanced technologies that connect as well as disturb settled boundaries, whether geographical or bodily, not to mention philosophical questionings of traditional western humanism, the boundaries of the human subject have been contested. The human body, traditionally imagined as closed and autonomous, has been opened up to a world of forces and agencies that are strange, other and often deeply disturbing when viewed from an anthropocentric standpoint.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015
Keywords
gender, sex, human, non-human, somatechnics, body, ethics
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126237 (URN)10.3366/soma.2015.0156 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2016-04-07
Radomska, M. (2015). Zylinska, Joanna, Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene, Ann Arbor: Michigan Press/Open Humanities Press, 2014, 152 pp. ISBN 9781607853299 [Review]. philoSOPHIA, 5(2), 315-317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Zylinska, Joanna, Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene, Ann Arbor: Michigan Press/Open Humanities Press, 2014, 152 pp. ISBN 9781607853299
2015 (English)In: philoSOPHIA, ISSN 2155-0891, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 315-317Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

In both its form and composition , Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene (2014) by Joanna Zylinska is a short, original, and elegant book, the aim of which, as the author emphasizes, is to “tell a different story about the world and our human positioning in and with it, while taking seriously what science has to say about life and death” (Zylinska 2014, 11). The book consists of ten chapters, each of which can be seen as an independent essay representing one element of the overall argument and thus constituting a possible entry point.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: SUNY Press, 2015
Keywords
anthropocene; ethics; gender; nonhuman; life
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125132 (URN)
Available from: 2016-02-15 Created: 2016-02-15 Last updated: 2016-02-19
Radomska, M. (2014). Wasting Life: An Ethico-Aesthetics of the Non/Living. In: : . Paper presented at Life Matters: Affect, Sex, and Control International Conference. 26-28 May 2014, Linköping University.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wasting Life: An Ethico-Aesthetics of the Non/Living
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
life, waste, bioart, bioscience, gender, non-living
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114652 (URN)
Conference
Life Matters: Affect, Sex, and Control International Conference. 26-28 May 2014, Linköping University
Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-03-02 Last updated: 2015-03-11
Radomska, M. (2013). As the Non/Living Twitches: Bioart, Movement, and the Question of Life. In: : . Paper presented at “5th Beyond Humanism Conference: The Posthuman”, University of Roma 3, Rome, Italy; 11-14 September 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>As the Non/Living Twitches: Bioart, Movement, and the Question of Life
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
bioart, tissue cultures, non-living, gender, life, posthumanism
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114683 (URN)
Conference
“5th Beyond Humanism Conference: The Posthuman”, University of Roma 3, Rome, Italy; 11-14 September 2013
Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-03-02 Last updated: 2015-03-12
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8520-6785

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