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Stenbäck, V., Marsja, E., Ellis, R. J. & Rönnberg, J. (2023). Relationships between behavioural and self-report measures in speech recognition in noise. International Journal of Audiology, 62(2), 101-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between behavioural and self-report measures in speech recognition in noise
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

Using data from the n200-study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between behavioural (the Swedish HINT and Hagerman speech-in-noise tests) and self-report (Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Questionnaire (SSQ)) measures of listening under adverse conditions.

Design

The Swedish HINT was masked with a speech-shaped noise (SSN), the Hagerman was masked with a SSN and a four-talker babble, and the subscales from the SSQ were used as a self-report measure. The HINT and Hagerman were administered through an experimental hearing aid.

Study sample

This study included 191 hearing aid users with hearing loss (mean PTA4 = 37.6, SD = 10.8) and 195 normally hearing adults (mean PTA4 = 10.0, SD = 6.0).ResultsThe present study found correlations between behavioural measures of speech-in-noise and self-report scores of the SSQ in normally hearing individuals, but not in hearing aid users.

Conclusion

The present study may help identify relationships between clinically used behavioural measures, and a self-report measure of speech recognition. The results from the present study suggest that use of a self-report measure as a complement to behavioural speech in noise tests might help to further our understanding of how self-report, and behavioural results can be generalised to everyday functioning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Speech perception, hearing loss, SSQ, age-related hearing loss
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-183739 (URN)10.1080/14992027.2022.2047232 (DOI)000771248900001 ()35306958 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: FORTE, Vetenskapsradet

Available from: 2022-03-21 Created: 2022-03-21 Last updated: 2023-11-21Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Marsja, E., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2022). Informational masking and listening effort in speech recognition innoise: the role of working memory capacity and inhibitory control in older adults with and without hearing impairmen. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 65(11), 4417-4428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Informational masking and listening effort in speech recognition innoise: the role of working memory capacity and inhibitory control in older adults with and without hearing impairmen
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 65, no 11, p. 4417-4428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The study aimed to assess the relationship between 1) speech-recognition-in-noise, mask type, working memory capacity (WMC), inhibitory control, and 2) self-rated listening effort, speech material, and mask type, in older adults with and without hearing-impairment. It was of special interest to assess the relationship between WMC, inhibitory control, and speech-recognition-in-noise when informational maskers masked target speech.

Method: A mixed design was used. A group (N= 24) of older (mean age = 69.7 years) HI individuals, and a group of age-normal hearing adults (mean age = 59.3 years, SD = 6.5) participated in the study. The participants were presented with auditory tests in a sound attenuated room and the cognitive tests in a quiet office. The participants were asked to rate listening effort after being presented with energetic and informational background maskers in two different speech materials used in this study (i.e., Hearing in Noise Test and the Hagerman Test). Linear-Mixed Effects models were set up to assess the effect of the two different speech materials, energetic and informational maskers, hearing ability, WMC, inhibitory control, and self-rated listening effort.

Results: Results showed that WMC and inhibitory control was of importance for speech-recognition-in-noise, even when controlling for PTA4 (pure tone average 4) hearing thresholds and age, when the maskers were informational. Concerning listening effort, on the other hand,  the results suggest that hearing ability, but not cognitive abilities, is important for self-rated listening effort in speech-recognition-in-noise.

Conclusion: Speech-in-noise recognition is more dependent on WMC for older adults in informational maskers than in energetic maskers. Hearing ability is a stronger predictor than cognition for self-rated listening effort.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC, 2022
Keywords
speech-in-noise, hearing impairment, presbycusis, working memory capacity, inhibition, listening effort, speech recognition
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-187061 (URN)10.1044/2022_JSLHR-21-00674 (DOI)000891439000028 ()36283680 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2009-1753
Note

Funding: Swedish Research Council [421-2009-1753]

Available from: 2022-09-09 Created: 2022-09-09 Last updated: 2022-12-20
Marsja, E., Stenbäck, V., Moradi, S., Danielsson, H. & Rönnberg, J. (2022). Is Having Hearing Loss Fundamentally Different?: Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling of the Effect of Cognitive Functioning on Speech Identificatio. Ear and Hearing, 43(5), 1437-1446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Having Hearing Loss Fundamentally Different?: Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling of the Effect of Cognitive Functioning on Speech Identificatio
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2022 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1437-1446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Previous research suggests that there is a robust relationship between cognitive functioning and speech-in-noise performance for older adults with age-related hearing loss. For normal-hearing adults, on the other hand, the research is not entirely clear. Therefore, the current study aimed to examine the relationship between cognitive functioning, aging, and speech-in-noise, in a group of older normal-hearing persons and older persons with hearing loss who wear hearing aids.

Design: We analyzed data from 199 older normal-hearing individuals (mean age = 61.2) and 200 older individuals with hearing loss (mean age = 60.9) using multigroup structural equation modeling. Four cognitively related tasks were used to create a cognitive functioning construct: the reading span task, a visuospatial working memory task, the semantic word-pairs task, and Raven’s progressive matrices. Speech-in-noise, on the other hand, was measured using Hagerman sentences. The Hagerman sentences were presented via an experimental hearing aid to both normal hearing and hearing-impaired groups. Furthermore, the sentences were presented with one of the two background noise conditions: the Hagerman original speech-shaped noise or four-talker babble. Each noise condition was also presented with three different hearing processing settings: linear processing, fast compression, and noise reduction.

Results: Cognitive functioning was significantly related to speech-in-noise identification. Moreover, aging had a significant effect on both speech-in-noise and cognitive functioning. With regression weights constrained to be equal for the two groups, the final model had the best fit to the data. Importantly, the results showed that the relationship between cognitive functioning and speech-in-noise was not different for the two groups. Furthermore, the same pattern was evident for aging: the effects of aging on cognitive functioning and aging on speech-in-noise were not different between groups.

Conclusion: Our findings revealed similar cognitive functioning and aging effects on speech-in-noise performance in older normal-hearing and aided hearing-impaired listeners. In conclusion, the findings support the Ease of Language Understanding model as cognitive processes play a critical role in speech-in-noise independent from the hearing status of elderly individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2022
Keywords
Aging; Cognitive functioning; Ravens; Speech in noise; Structural equation modeling; Working memory
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-182150 (URN)10.1097/aud.0000000000001196 (DOI)000843475700006 ()34983896 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2007-8654Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-1693Swedish Research Council, VR-2017-06092
Note

Funding: Linnaeus Centre HEAD excellence center grant from the Swedish Research Council [349-2007-8654]; FORTE [2012-1693]; Swedish Research Council [VR-2017-06092]

Available from: 2022-01-07 Created: 2022-01-07 Last updated: 2022-09-05Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Sandén, P. & Larsson Abbad, G. (2022). Post-covid support of teachers’ and students’ learning communities in higher education. In: : . Paper presented at NU2022, Stockholm.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-covid support of teachers’ and students’ learning communities in higher education
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-203197 (URN)
Conference
NU2022, Stockholm
Available from: 2024-05-03 Created: 2024-05-03 Last updated: 2024-05-07Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Schminder, J., Söderström, A., Sandén, P. & Larsson Abbad, G. (2022). Support and inclusion in post-covid higher education – student perception on support and learning during digital teaching.. In: EuroSoTL 2022 Proceedings: . Paper presented at EuroSoTL 2022, 16-17 June, 2022 (pp. 203-208). Manchester, Great Britain
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Support and inclusion in post-covid higher education – student perception on support and learning during digital teaching.
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2022 (English)In: EuroSoTL 2022 Proceedings, Manchester, Great Britain, 2022, p. 203-208Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The presentation aims to discuss students' perceptions of support from peers and teachers, organising and planning studies in distance learning, perceptions of students' own learning, and perceptions of inclusion in digital teaching. The discussion will be grounded in survey results from a pilot project and in relation to Universal Design for Learning, where inclusion is a key element.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester, Great Britain: , 2022
Keywords
Universal Design for Learning, Distance learning, Inclusion in digital teaching
National Category
Educational Sciences Pedagogy Learning Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-189425 (URN)
Conference
EuroSoTL 2022, 16-17 June, 2022
Funder
Linköpings universitet
Available from: 2022-10-21 Created: 2022-10-21 Last updated: 2023-11-23Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise. In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015.: . Paper presented at Cognitive Hearing SCience and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise
2015 (English)In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive abilities are important for a number of human attributes, such as making sense of communication, holding information active in memory, and making decisions. When it is the goal to focus on a single target voice, and resist intrusions from irrelevant information, cognitive inhibition can aid us in our endeavour. Cognitive inhibition is thought to support and co-operate with working memory. Abilities such as cognitive inhibition and working memory are also important for speech processing, even more so when listening to speech under adverse conditions. In order to assess different difficulties that can arise in every day listening situations, it´s of importance to have solid methods for measuring cognitive abilities. In the present study we present a task assessing cognitive inhibition, and how it relates to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and speech-recognition-in-noise. Forty-six young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a speech-in-noise test. Our results suggest that individuals with high WMC, also exhibit good cognitive inhibition. The results also indicate that those who perform well in the cognitive inhibition task need less favourable signal-to-noise-ratios in the speech-recognition task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance in speech-recognition tasks when listening under adverse conditions. 

Keywords
speech in noise, working memory, inhibition, normal hearing, working memory capacity
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126356 (URN)
Conference
Cognitive Hearing SCience and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 8723111202
Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2016-04-11Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). The role of cognitive abilities in younger and older normally hearing adults when listening to speech under adverse conditions. In: Larry E Humes (Ed.), 6th Aging and Speech Communication Research Conference 2015 (“ASC15”) Bloomington, Indiana, USA October 11-14, 2015: . Paper presented at Aging and Speech Communication.. Swedish institute for disability research Linaeus centre head graduate school.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of cognitive abilities in younger and older normally hearing adults when listening to speech under adverse conditions
2015 (English)In: 6th Aging and Speech Communication Research Conference 2015 (“ASC15”) Bloomington, Indiana, USA October 11-14, 2015 / [ed] Larry E Humes, 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive abilities, such as working memory capacity (WMC), lexical decision making, and cognitive inhibition, can help predict performance on speech-recognition-in-noise tasks. Working memory is assumed to play a major part in every day listening situations, storing and actively working with relevant information, while inhibitory control helps to suppress and separate irrelevant information from interfering with the information processing. With increasing age, comes decreasing cognitive abilities, such as declines in WMC, speed of information processing, and inhibitory control, leading to problems when selectively attending to speech while inhibiting interfering distractors. The aim of the present study was to examine age-related declines in WMC, inhibitory control, and lexical decision making, and their respective roles when listening to speech under adverse listening conditions. Twenty-four young normally-hearing (NH), and 24 elderly ( for their age) NH individuals participated in the study. They completing a cognitive test battery assessing WMC, cognitive inhibition, and lexical decision making, as well as a closed-set (Hagerman sentences) and an open-set (HINT) speech-recognition-in-noise task masked with different maskers. We will present results comparing cognitive abilities in younger normally-hearing individuals with elderly normally-hearing individuals, and how age and cognitive abilities relates to performance on speech-recognition-in-noise tasks.

Keywords
speech-in-noise, speech recognition, inhibition, verbal ability, hearing, working memory capacity, listening effort
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122386 (URN)
Conference
Aging and Speech Communication.. Swedish institute for disability research Linaeus centre head graduate school
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Available from: 2015-10-30 Created: 2015-10-30 Last updated: 2016-03-24Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). the Speech recognition under adverse listening conditions in young normally-hearing listeners. In: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden.: . Paper presented at Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>the Speech recognition under adverse listening conditions in young normally-hearing listeners
2015 (English)In: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden., 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the present study we aimed to investigate individual differences in cognitive inhibition, WMC, and how they relate to performance on a speech-recognition-in-noise task. Sixteen young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a sentence corpus masked by 5 different maskers, targeting 80% speech-recognition. One masker was a slightly modulated (10%) speech-shaped noise (SSN), 2 maskers were constructed by modulating the SSN with the envelopes from a single female talker, and the international speech test signal (ISTS). We also masked the target sentences with the ISTS, and a single female talker reading a passage in a Swedish newspaper. Our results showed that cognitive inhibition is significantly related to performance when maskers with meaningful, semantic information is used. The results further indicate that young normally-hearing individuals can take advantage of temporal and spectral dips to fill in missing information. Our findings suggest that choice of speech material is of importance for the outcome in speech-recognition-in-noise tasks. We further propose that tasks of cognitive inhibition can be used to predict performance in a speech-recognition task.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126357 (URN)
Conference
Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden.
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 8723111202
Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2016-04-11Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). The Swedish Hayling task, and its relation to working memory, verbal ability, and speech-recognition-in-noise. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(3), 264-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Hayling task, and its relation to working memory, verbal ability, and speech-recognition-in-noise
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 264-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive functions and speech-recognition-in-noise were evaluated with a cognitive test battery, assessing response inhibition using the Hayling task, working memory capacity (WMC) and verbal information processing, and an auditory test of speech recognition. The cognitive tests were performed in silence whereas the speech recognition task was presented in noise. Thirty young normally-hearing individuals participated in the study. The aim of the study was to investigate one executive function, response inhibition, and whether it is related to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and how speech-recognition-in-noise relates to WMC and inhibitory control. The results showed a significant difference between initiation and response inhibition, suggesting that the Hayling task taps cognitive activity responsible for executive control. Our findings also suggest that high verbal ability was associated with better performance in the Hayling task. We also present findings suggesting that individuals who perform well on tasks involving response inhibition, and WMC, also perform well on a speech-in-noise task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance on speech-in-noise tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2015
Keywords
executive functions, inhibition, cognitive control, working memory capacity, speech recognition in noise, hearing
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117054 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12206 (DOI)000354185700003 ()25819210 (PubMedID)
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2009-1753
Available from: 2015-04-14 Created: 2015-04-14 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2013). Executive function and speech- in- noise perception: the role of inhibition. In: Larry E Humes (Ed.), Aging and Speech Communication, 2013: . Paper presented at 5th International and Interdisciplinary Research Conference, Aging and Speech Communication, October 6-9, 2013, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Executive function and speech- in- noise perception: the role of inhibition
2013 (English)In: Aging and Speech Communication, 2013 / [ed] Larry E Humes, 2013Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

 

Little is known about the relation between the ability to inhibit irrelevant information and perceiving speech-in-noise and the effects of hearing loss and ageing on this relationship. In settings where a listening task is difficult, individuals use both their hearing and cognitive abilities to process the auditory information. To perceive speech in noise, one must focus on the relevant information and at the same time inhibit the processing of irrelevant information. Results from recent studies indicate that older adults have difficulties singling out speech in noise, and selectively attend to target speech while inhibiting irrelevant information.

 

The purpose of the project is to increase theoretical knowledge concerning the relation between age, perceiving speech-in-noise and inhibition. The pilot study involved the administration of a test battery consisting of audiological, cognitive and speech perception tests. The results of a series of ANOVAs and correlational analyses will be presented to show differences in performance and the relation between performance on the cognitive, audiological and speech-perception tasks. Upon completion, the results of this study will be used to compare younger individuals´ performance with older adults with and without hearing loss to determine the effect of age and hearing ability on the relation between capacity to inhibit irrelevant information and speech-in-noise recognition.

Keywords
Executive functions, inhibition, speech in noise perception, The Hayling test, working memory
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103209 (URN)
Conference
5th International and Interdisciplinary Research Conference, Aging and Speech Communication, October 6-9, 2013, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-01-15 Created: 2014-01-15 Last updated: 2016-05-04
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0369-3354

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