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BETA
Enrich Prast, Alex
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Feiz, R., Ammenberg, J., Björn, A., Yufang, G., Karlsson, M., Liu, Y., . . . Zhang, F. (2019). Biogas Potential for Improved Sustainability in Guangzhou, China: A Study Focusing on Food Waste on Xiaoguwei Island. Sustainability, 11(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biogas Potential for Improved Sustainability in Guangzhou, China: A Study Focusing on Food Waste on Xiaoguwei Island
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2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a result of rapid development in China and the growth of megacities, large amounts of organic wastes are generated within relatively small areas. Part of these wastes can be used to produce biogas, not only to reduce waste-related problems, but also to provide renewable energy, recycle nutrients, and lower greenhouse gases and air polluting emissions. This article is focused on the conditions for biogas solutions in Guangzhou. It is based on a transdisciplinary project that integrates several approaches, for example, literature studies and lab analysis of food waste to estimate the food waste potential, interviews to learn about the socio-technical context and conditions, and life-cycle assessment to investigate the performance of different waste management scenarios involving biogas production. Xiaoguwei Island, with a population of about 250,000 people, was chosen as the area of study. The results show that there are significant food waste potentials on the island, and that all studied scenarios could contribute to a net reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Several socio-technical barriers were identified, but it is expected that the forthcoming regulatory changes help to overcome some of them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
biogas, food waste, system study, biomethane potential, socio-technical study, megacities, China, Guangzhou city, Xiaoguwei Island
National Category
Environmental Engineering Energy Systems Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155110 (URN)10.3390/su11061556 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-03-27Bibliographically approved
Abreu, F., Leão, P., Vargas, G., Cypriano, J., Figueiredo, V., Enrich Prast, A., . . . Lins, U. (2018). Culture-independent characterization of a novel magnetotactic member affiliated to the Beta class of the Proteobacteria phylum from an acidic lagoon. Environmental Microbiology, 20(7), 2615-2624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Culture-independent characterization of a novel magnetotactic member affiliated to the Beta class of the Proteobacteria phylum from an acidic lagoon
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 2615-2624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Summary Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) comprise a group of motile microorganisms common in most mesothermal aquatic habitats with pH values around neutrality. However, during the last two decades, a number of MTB from extreme environments have been characterized including: cultured alkaliphilic strains belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria class of the Proteobacteria phylum; uncultured moderately thermophilic strains belonging to the Nitrospirae phylum; cultured and uncultured moderately halophilic or strongly halotolerant bacteria affiliated with the Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria classes and an uncultured psychrophilic species belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria class. Here, we used culture-independent techniques to characterize MTB from an acidic freshwater lagoon in Brazil (pH ? 4.4). MTB morphotypes found in this acidic lagoon included cocci, rods, spirilla and vibrioid cells. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was the only mineral identified in magnetosomes of these MTB while magnetite magnetosome crystal morphologies within the different MTB cells included cuboctahedral (present in spirilla), elongated prismatic (present in cocci and vibrios) and bullet-shaped (present in rod-shaped cells). Intracellular pH measurements using fluorescent dyes showed that the cytoplasmic pH was close to neutral in most MTB cells and acidic in some intracellular granules. Based on 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analyses, some of the retrieved gene sequences belonged to the genus Herbaspirillum within the Betaproteobacteria class of the Proteobacteria phylum. Fluorescent in situ hybridization using a Herbaspirillum-specific probe hybridized with vibrioid MTB in magnetically-enriched samples. Transmission electron microscopy of the Herbaspirillum-like MTB revealed the presence of many intracellular granules and a single chain of elongated prismatic magnetite magnetosomes. Diverse populations of MTB have not seemed to have been described in detail in an acid environment. In addition, this is the first report of an MTB phylogenetically affiliated with Betaproteobacteria class.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley/Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150986 (URN)10.1111/1462-2920.14286 (DOI)000443114300023 ()
Note

Funding agencies: CNPq; CAPES; FAPERJ; U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) [EAR-1423939]

Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2019-03-18
Call, M., Sanders, C. J., Enrich Prast, A., Sanders, L., Marotta, H., Santos, I. R. & Maher, D. T. (2018). Radon-traced pore-water as a potential source of CO2 and CH4 to receding black and clear water environments in the Amazon Basin. Limnology and Oceanography Letters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radon-traced pore-water as a potential source of CO2 and CH4 to receding black and clear water environments in the Amazon Basin
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2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, ISSN 2378-2242Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Abstract Groundwater is a primary source of dissolved CO2 and CH4 in Amazonian headwaters, yet in higher order rivers, a groundwater/pore-water source is difficult to constrain due to the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of pore-water exchange. Here, we report coupled, high resolution measurements of pCO2, CH4, and 222Rn (a natural pore-water and groundwater tracer) during receding waters in the three major water types of the Central Amazon Basin: black (Negro River); clear (Tapajós River); white (Madeira River). Considerable spatial heterogeneity was observed in pCO2, CH4, and 222Rn concentrations ranging from 460 ?atm to 8030 ?atm, 7 nM to 281 nM, and 713 dpm m?3 to 8516 dpm m?3, respectively. The significant correlations between pCO2 and CH4 to 222Rn in the black and clear waters suggests that pore-water further enhanced CO2 supersaturation by 18?47% and is a driver of CH4 dynamics in these waters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150985 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10089 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-07
Signori, C. N., Pellizari, V. H., Enrich Prast, A. & Sievert, S. M. (2018). Spatiotemporal dynamics of marine bacterial and archaeal communities in surface waters off the northern Antarctic Peninsula. Deep-sea research. Part II, Topical studies in oceanography, 149, 150-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatiotemporal dynamics of marine bacterial and archaeal communities in surface waters off the northern Antarctic Peninsula
2018 (English)In: Deep-sea research. Part II, Topical studies in oceanography, ISSN 0967-0645, E-ISSN 1879-0100, Vol. 149, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seasonal changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial communities in polar regions are commonly observed, requiring strategies of microbes to adapt to the corresponding changes in environmental conditions. These natural fluctuations form the backdrop for changes induced by anthropogenic impacts. The main goal of this study was to assess the seasonal and temporal changes in bacterial and archaeal diversity and community structure off the northern Antarctic Peninsula over several seasons (spring, summer, autumn) from 2013 to 2015. Ten monitoring stations were selected across the Gerlache and Bransfield Straits and nearby Elephant Island, and archaeal and bacterial communities examined by amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Alpha-diversity indices were higher in spring and correlated significantly with temperature. Spring was characterized by the presence of SAR11, and microbial communities remaining from winter, including representatives of Thaumarchaeota (Nimosopurnilus), Euryarchaeota, members of Oceanospirillales, SAR324. Summer and autumn were characterized by a high prevalence of Flavobacteria (NS5 marine group and Polaribacter), Alphaproizobacteria (Rhodobacterales and SAR11 Glade) and Gammaproteobacteria (Oceanospirillales/Balneatrix and Celivibrionales), generally known to be associated with organic matter degradation. Relatively higher abundance of phytoplankton groups occurred in spring, mainly characterized by the presence of the haptophyte Phaeocystis and the diatom Corethron, influencing the succession of heterotrophic bacterial communities. Microbial diversity and community structure varied significantly over time, but not over space, i.e., were similar between monitoring stations for the same time. In addition, the observed interannual variability in microbial community structure might be related to an increase in sea surface temperature. Environmental conditions related to seasonal variation, including temperature and most likely phytoplankton derived organic matter, appear to have triggered the observed shifts in microbial communities in the waters off the northern Antarctic Peninsula.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2018
Keywords
Microbial Oceanography; Phytoplankton; Interannual variability; Seasonal changes; Spatial changes; Temperature; Organic matter
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149885 (URN)10.1016/j.dsr2.2017.12.017 (DOI)000437037100014 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Project INTERBIOTA (CNPq) [407889/2013-2]; INCT-MAR-COI (CNPq); CNPq; FAPERJ; Investment in Science Funds at WHOI; Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Fellowship; Sao Paulo Research Foundation [FAPESP 2016/16183-5]

Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2018-08-22
Masuda, L. S. & Enrich Prast, A. (2016). Benthic microalgae community response to flooding in a tropical salt flat. Brazilian Journal of Biology, 76(3), 577-582
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benthic microalgae community response to flooding in a tropical salt flat
2016 (English)In: Brazilian Journal of Biology, ISSN 1519-6984, E-ISSN 1678-4375, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 577-582Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research evaluated the effect of flooding on the microphytobenthos community structure in a microbial mat from a tropical salt flat. Field samples were collected during four consecutive days: on the first three days the salt flat was dry, on the fourth day it was flooded by rain. In order to evaluate the community maintained in flood conditions, samples from this area were collected and kept in the laboratory for 10 days with sea water. The results of total abundance of microphytobenthos varied from 4.2 x 10(8) to 2.9 x 10(9) organisms L-1, total density increased one order of magnitude under the effect of water for both situations of precipitation in the salt flat and in experimental conditions, an increase due to the high abundance of Microcoleus spp. Shannon index (H) was higher during the desiccation period. Our data suggest that changes in the abundance of organisms were due to the effect of water. The dominance of the most abundant taxa remained the same under conditions of desiccation and influence of water, and there is probably a consortium of microorganisms in the microbial mat that helps to maintain these dominances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INT INST ECOLOGY, 2016
Keywords
microphytobenthos; cyanobacteria; Microcoleus spp.; hypersaline environment
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130415 (URN)10.1590/1519-6984.18314 (DOI)000378893100003 ()27097089 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Brazilian National Council of Technological and Scientific Development (INCT-MAR-COI); CNPq; Brazilian Federal Agency for Support and Evaluation of Graduate Education (Capes)

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Enrich Prast, A., Figueiredo, V., De, E. F. .. & Nielsen, L. (2016). Controls of sediment nitrogen dynamics in tropical coastal lagoons. PLoS ONE, 11(5), Article ID e0155586.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Controls of sediment nitrogen dynamics in tropical coastal lagoons
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0155586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (amp;lt;5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1 ), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2 ) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate NO3 ) reduction to ammonium (NH4 + ; DNRA) in the sediment.15NO3 and 15NH4 + conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. -3 reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite NO2 ) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and denitrification processes. The results presented here show that the potential activity of anaerobic nitrate-reducing organisms is not dependent on the availability of environmental NO3. © 2016 Enrich-Prast et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2016
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129246 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0155586 (DOI)000376589400019 ()27175907 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84971261506 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|CAPES, Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior; CNPq, Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior

Available from: 2016-06-14 Created: 2016-06-14 Last updated: 2018-07-04
Peixoto, R. B., Marotta, H., Bastviken, D. & Enrich Prast, A. (2016). Floating Aquatic Macrophytes Can Substantially Offset Open Water CO2 Emissions from Tropical Floodplain Lake Ecosystems. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 19(4), 724-736
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Floating Aquatic Macrophytes Can Substantially Offset Open Water CO2 Emissions from Tropical Floodplain Lake Ecosystems
2016 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 724-736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tropical floodplain lake ecosystems are recognized as important sources of carbon (C) from the water to the atmosphere. They receive large amounts of organic matter and nutrients from the watershed, leading to intense net heterotrophy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission from open waters. However, the role of extensive stands of floating macrophytes colonizing floodplains areas is still neglected in assessments of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). We assessed rates of air-lake CO2 flux using static chambers in both open waters and waters covered by the widespread floating aquatic macrophyte (water hyacinth; Eichornia sp.) in two tropical floodplain lakes in Pantanal, Brazil during different hydrological seasons. In both lakes, areas colonized by floating macrophytes were a net CO2 sink during all seasons. In contrast, open waters emitted CO2, with higher emissions during the rising and high water periods. Our results indicate that the lake NEE can be substantially overestimated (fivefold or more in the studied lakes) if the carbon fixation by macrophytes is not considered. The contribution of these plants can lead to neutral or negative NEE (that is, net uptake of CO2) on a yearly basis. This highlights the importance of floating aquatic macrophytes for the C balance in shallow lakes and extensive floodplain areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2016
Keywords
CO2 fluxes; littoral zone; aquatic plants; Pantanal; net ecosystem exchange; Eichornia sp
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129141 (URN)10.1007/s10021-016-9964-3 (DOI)000376283100012 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|CNPq; Capes; FAPERJ; "Jovem Cientista do Nosso Estado; "Cientista do Nosso Estado; "Science without Borders STINT/Capes" [BEX 7937/14-8]; STINT; VR

Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Enrich Prast, A., Lucia Santoro, A., Coutinho, R. S., Peter Nielsen, L. & Esteves, F. A. (2016). Sediment Denitrification in Two Contrasting Tropical Shallow Lagoons. Estuaries and Coasts, 39(3), 657-663
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sediment Denitrification in Two Contrasting Tropical Shallow Lagoons
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2016 (English)In: Estuaries and Coasts, ISSN 1559-2723, E-ISSN 1559-2731, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 657-663Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sediment denitrification was monthly evaluated in two tropical coastal lagoons with different trophic states using the N-15 isotope pairing technique. Denitrification rates were very low in both environments, always < 5.0 mu mol N-2 m(-2) h(-1) and were not significantly different between them. Oxygen consumption varied from 426 to 4248 mu mol O-2 m(-2) h(-1) and was generally three times higher in the meso-eutrophic than the oligotrophic lagoon. The low denitrification activity was ascribed to both low water NO3- concentrations (< 2.0 mu M) and little nitrate supply from nitrification. There was no correlation of denitrification with nitrate or ammonium fluxes. Sediments in temperate environments with similar oxygen consumption rates usually presented a higher proportion of nitrification-denitrification rates. Sediment oxygen consumption was a good predictor of sediment denitrification in both studied lagoons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2016
Keywords
Nitrogen; Denitrification; Oxygen consumption; Sediment; Tropical; Coastal lagoons
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127546 (URN)10.1007/s12237-015-0017-5 (DOI)000373360500005 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|FAPERJ; CAPES; CNPq; Petrobras; Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research

Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Pinho, L., Duarte, C. M., Marotta, H. & Enrich Prast, A. (2016). Temperature dependence of the relationship between pCO(2) and dissolved organic carbon in lakes. Biogeosciences, 13(3), 865-871
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temperature dependence of the relationship between pCO(2) and dissolved organic carbon in lakes
2016 (English)In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 865-871Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in Brazilian lakes, encompassing 225 samples across a wide latitudinal range in the tropics, was tested. Unlike the positive relationship reported for lake waters, which was largely based on temperate lakes, we found no significant relationship for low-latitude lakes (< 33 degrees), despite very broad ranges in both pCO(2) and DOC levels. These results suggest substantial differences in the carbon cycling of low-latitude lakes, which must be considered when upscaling limnetic carbon cycling to global scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH, 2016
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126269 (URN)10.5194/bg-13-865-2016 (DOI)000370973900016 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|CAPES (period in Brazil); FAPERJ (period in Spain); CAPES; FAPERJ (Programa Jovem Cientista do Nosso Estado); CNPq

Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Marotta, H. & Enrich Prast, A. (2015). Catastrophic shifts in the aquatic primary production revealed by a small low-flow section of tropical downstream after dredging. Brazilian Journal of Biology, 75(4), 804-811
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catastrophic shifts in the aquatic primary production revealed by a small low-flow section of tropical downstream after dredging
2015 (English)In: Brazilian Journal of Biology, ISSN 1519-6984, E-ISSN 1678-4375, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 804-811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dredging is a catastrophic disturbance that directly affects key biological processes in aquatic ecosystems, especially in those small and shallow. In the tropics, metabolic responses could still be enhanced by the high temperatures and solar incidence. Here, we assessed changes in the aquatic primary production along a small section of low-flow tropical downstream (Imboassica Stream, Brazil) after dredging. Our results suggested that these ecosystems may show catastrophic shifts between net heterotrophy and autotrophy in waters based on three short-term stages following the dredging: (I) a strongly heterotrophic net primary production -NPP- coupled to an intense respiration -R- likely supported by high resuspended organic sediments and nutrients from the bottom; (II) a strongly autotrophic NPP coupled to an intense gross primary production -GPP- favored by the high nutrient levels and low solar light attenuation from suspended solids or aquatic macrophytes; and (III) a NPP near to the equilibrium coupled to low GPP and R rates following, respectively, the shading by aquatic macrophytes and high particulate sedimentation. In conclusion, changes in aquatic primary production could be an important threshold for controlling drastic shifts in the organic matter cycling and the subsequent silting up of small tropical streams after dredging events.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INT INST ECOLOGY, 2015
Keywords
primary production; catastrophic shifts; dredging; tropical streams
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124138 (URN)10.1590/1519-6984.23213 (DOI)000367097100005 ()26602334 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Brazilian research agency FAPERJ; Brazilian research agency CAPES; Brazilian research agency CNPq; CNPq; FAPERJ

Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
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