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Johansson, I.-L., Samuelsson, C. & Müller, N. (2023). Consonant articulation acoustics and intelligibility in Swedish speakers with Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 37(9), 845-865
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consonant articulation acoustics and intelligibility in Swedish speakers with Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study
2023 (English)In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 845-865Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Imprecise consonant articulation is common in speakers with Parkinson’s disease and can affect intelligibility. The research on the relationship between acoustic speech measures and intelligibility in Parkinson’s disease is limited, and most of the research has been conducted on English. This pilot study investigated aspects of consonant articulation acoustics in eleven Swedish speakers with Parkinson’s disease and six neurologically healthy persons. The focus of the study was on consonant cluster production, articulatory motion rate and variation, and voice onset time, and how these acoustic features correlate with speech intelligibility. Among the measures in the present study, typicality ratings of heterorganic consonant clusters /spr/ and /skr/ had the strongest correlations with intelligibility. Measures based on syllable repetition, such as repetition rate and voice onset time, showed varying results with weak to moderate correlations with intelligibility. One conclusion is that some acoustic measures may be more sensitive than others to the impact of the underlying sensory-motor impairment and dysarthria on speech production and intelligibility in speakers with Parkinson’s disease. Some aspects of articulation appear to be equally demanding in terms of acoustic realization for elderly healthy speakers and for speakers with Parkinson’s disease, such as sequential motion rate measures. Clinically, this would imply that for the purpose of detecting signs of disordered speech motor control, choosing measures with less variation among older speakers without articulation impairment would lead to more robust results. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2023
Keywords
Dysarthria, Parkinson’s disease, Speech acoustics, Intelligibility
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-187255 (URN)10.1080/02699206.2022.2095926 (DOI)000825438200001 ()35833475 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Foundation for Parkinson Research at Linkoping University [LiU 2015-00194]; Region Ostergotland [LiO 620581]; Swedish Parkinson Foundation [1076/18]

Available from: 2022-08-16 Created: 2022-08-16 Last updated: 2023-11-14Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I.-L., Samuelsson, C. & Müller, N. (2022). Picture description in the assessment of connected speech intelligibility in Parkinson's disease: A pilot study. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 74(5), 320-334
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Picture description in the assessment of connected speech intelligibility in Parkinson's disease: A pilot study
2022 (English)In: Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, ISSN 1021-7762, E-ISSN 1421-9972, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 320-334Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Assessment of intelligibility in dysarthria tends to rely on oral reading of sentences or words. However, self-generated utterances are closer to a clients’ natural speech. This study investigated how transcription of utterances elicited by picture description can be used in the assessment of intelligibility in speakers with Parkinson’s disease.

Methods: Speech samples from eleven speakers with Parkinson’s disease and six neurologically healthy persons were audio-recorded. Forty-two naive listeners completed transcriptions of self-generated sentences from a picture description task and orally read sentences from the Swedish Test of Intelligibility, as well as scaled ratings of narrative speech samples.

Results:  Intelligibility was higher in orally read than self-generated sentences and higher for content words than for the whole sentence in self-generated sentences for most of the speakers, although these within-group differences were not statistically significant at group level. Adding contextual leads for the listeners increased intelligibility in self-generated utterances significantly, but with individual variation. Although correlations between the intelligibility measures were at least moderate or strong, there was a considerable inter- and intra-speaker variability in intelligibility scores between tasks for the speakers with Parkinson’s disease, indicating individual variation of factors that impact intelligibility. Intelligibility scores from neurologically healthy speakers were generally high across tasks with no significant differences between the conditions.

Conclusion: Within-speaker variability supports literature recommendations to use multiple methods and tasks when assessing intelligibility. The inclusion of transcription of self-generated utterances elicited by picture description to the intelligibility assessment has the potential to provide additional information to assessment methods based on oral reading of pre-scripted sentences and to inform the planning of interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: S. Karger, 2022
Keywords
Dysarthria, Parkinson's disease, Intelligibility, Assessment, Picture description
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-184445 (URN)10.1159/000521906 (DOI)000858679900002 ()35021169 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Foundation for Parkinsons Research at Linkoping University [LiU 2015-00194]; Regional Council of Ostergotland [LiO 620581]; Swedish Parkinson Foundation [1076/18]

Available from: 2022-04-21 Created: 2022-04-21 Last updated: 2022-10-11Bibliographically approved
Lindeberg, S., Samuelsson, C. & Müller, N. (2021). Experiencing dementia: How does assessment of cognition and language relate to daily life?. Dementia, 20(4), 1408-1424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiencing dementia: How does assessment of cognition and language relate to daily life?
2021 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1408-1424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This Swedish study investigates how persons living with dementia report their experiences of cognitive and linguistic testing, as well as their perspectives on the communicative resources and barriers they experience in daily interactions. Eight dyads were included in this qualitative exploratory study; eight persons with dementia and eight family members with whom they interact with daily. Semi-structured interviews, with questions focusing on experiences of diagnostic pathways as well as communicative and cognitive function in daily life, were carried out together with standard clinical testing. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results shed light on the experiences of uncertainty during the dementia assessment process related to the assessment tasks, the consequences of the assessment and receiving a diagnosis. We interpret this as a result of the unfamiliar clinical focus on function as measured in decontextualised tasks, compared to the participants view based on their abilities in everyday life. The study also reveals that adjustments in daily life that are necessitated by the consequences of neurological change are often developed in collaboration between the person with dementia and their conversation partners. There are, however, reports of conflicting feelings by the persons diagnosed with dementia, and by their families, as well as their views on how to best handle change, while maintaining a sense of being a competent person through the progression of disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
dementia; clinical assessment; diagnosis; communication; interaction; daily life
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-168775 (URN)10.1177/1471301220945832 (DOI)000556277600001 ()32755318 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-08-31 Created: 2020-08-31 Last updated: 2022-04-26
Johansson, I.-L., Samuelsson, C. & Müller, N. (2020). Patients’ and communication partners’ experiences of communicative changes in Parkinson’s disease. Disability and Rehabilitation, 42(13), 1835-1843
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients’ and communication partners’ experiences of communicative changes in Parkinson’s disease
2020 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 42, no 13, p. 1835-1843Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the experiences of people with Parkinson’s disease and their close communication partners regarding disease-related communicative changes and participation in everyday conversations.

Materials and methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with six dyads consisting of a person with Parkinson’s disease and a close communication partner. The interview material was analysed through thematic analysis.

Results: The main theme was the experiences of barriers and facilitators for participation in conversations. Subthemes were experiences related to changes in voice and articulation, language and cognition, body language and facial expressions, fatigue, self-image, communicative initiative, and familiarity with conversation partner. The results show individual variation. A change observed in almost all dyads was the person with Parkinson’s disease participating less in conversations.

Conclusions: Assessment and interventions should be based on a broad perspective on communication, and individuals’ priorities should be foregrounded in intervention planning. Both the person with Parkinson’s disease and communication partners need to make adjustments for communication to work. Therefore, close communication partners should be included in assessment and intervention of communicationin Parkinson’s disease from an early stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Communication; participation; dysarthria; Parkinson’s disease; experiences; communication partner
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155068 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2018.1539875 (DOI)000547411200007 ()30669899 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060575229 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:  Foundation for Parkinson Research at Linkoping University

Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2021-04-25Bibliographically approved
Guendouzi, J., Meaux, A. & Müller, N. (2016). Avoiding interactional conflict in dementia: the influence of gender styles on interactions.. Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict, 4(1), 8-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avoiding interactional conflict in dementia: the influence of gender styles on interactions.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict, ISSN 2213-1272, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 8-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sociolinguistic research in the general population has established the existence of gender differences in the social use of language. In particular, it has been noted that women use more markers of politeness, small talk and structural devices (e.g. minimal responses, tag questions) to help maintain their conversations. Analysis of interactions involving people with dementia (PWD) suggests that these gender based differences were still present in the face of dementia. Furthermore, the use of these forms of language helped the women with dementia to avoid conflict and extend the length of their interactions. This study investigated whether the use of such language helped or hindered women with dementia in maintaining conversational satisfaction.

Keywords
gender, interactional resources, dementia, politeness
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128688 (URN)10.1075/jlac.4.1.01gue (DOI)
Available from: 2016-05-28 Created: 2016-05-28 Last updated: 2021-07-08
Ball, M., Isaksson, F., Larsson, E. & Müller, N. (2016). Dysarthria in Swedish. In: : . Paper presented at 16th ICPLA Meeting, Halifax, Canada, June 15-18 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dysarthria in Swedish
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Keywords
Dysarthria, Swedish
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130339 (URN)
Conference
16th ICPLA Meeting, Halifax, Canada, June 15-18 2016
Available from: 2016-07-29 Created: 2016-07-29 Last updated: 2019-02-06Bibliographically approved
Archer, B., Müller, N. & Penn, C. (2016). Facilitation effects of cueing techniques in two Sesotho speakers with anomia. Speech, Language and Hearing, 19(3), 140-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitation effects of cueing techniques in two Sesotho speakers with anomia
2016 (English)In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 140-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aphasiologists developing treatments for anomia should closely align therapy methods with the typological and morphological characteristics of the language in question. The lead author initiated this study to develop more defensible interventions for speakers of Sesotho, a South African language. Prefix-based cueing (our alternative name for initial phoneme cueing that describes these cues in Sesotho-oriented terms) was compared to a novel technique, root-based cueing (RBC). While prefix-based cues are described in the literature, we hypothesized root-based cues would be more appropriate in this context since they were thought to be more consonant with the linguistic parameters of Sesotho. Two speakers with aphasia, who demonstrated significant anomic symptoms, served as participants. We used a multiple-baseline, single case study design. Two 144-item word lists were developed with every item represented by a photograph. Each of the two word lists was associated with one of the two cueing techniques investigated. After baseline measurements were obtained, each participant attended eight facilitation sessions for each cueing condition, resulting in eight data points per condition and participant. For both participants, RBC resulted in greater naming performance than cueing by means of initial phonemes. Our explanation of these results is based on the Interactive Lexical Network model of lexical access; root-based cues may be more effective because they more efficiently constrain the number of lemmas activated after a cue is provided. We argue that a confluence of factors (word-retrieval processes and the character of Sesotho morphosyntax) gave rise to the noted differences in naming facilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Aphasia, Anomia, Interactive network model, Sesotho, Facilitation
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128689 (URN)10.1080/2050571X.2016.1155817 (DOI)2-s2.0-84981156290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-28 Created: 2016-05-28 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Qiang, L., Guo, X., Yao, Y. & Müller, N. (2016). Relative clauses preference in learners of Chinese as a second language. Chinese Journal of Applied Linguistics, 39, 199-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relative clauses preference in learners of Chinese as a second language
2016 (English)In: Chinese Journal of Applied Linguistics, ISSN 2192-9505, Vol. 39, p. 199-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whether preference for subject-extracted relative clauses in language processing is a universal rule has been debated with evidences from both the first and the second language acquisition studies. But very few studies focus on learners of Chinese as a second language. The current research studied Chinese subject/object-extracted relative clauses processing among learners of Chinese as a second language by the self-paced reading experiment. The results demonstrate a faster and more accurate processing of subject-extracted relative clauses in both subject and object modifying conditions, adding more evidence to the universal preference for the subject-extracted relative clauses. Both Frequency-based Accounts and Memory-based Accounts are discussed related to the current findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2016
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128690 (URN)10.1515/cjal-2016-0013 (DOI)000378627300005 ()
Available from: 2016-05-28 Created: 2016-05-28 Last updated: 2020-10-22
Kuecker, K., Lockenvitz, S. & Müller, N. (2015). Amount of rhoticity in schwar and in vowel plus /r/ in American English. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 29(8-10), 623-629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amount of rhoticity in schwar and in vowel plus /r/ in American English
2015 (English)In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 8-10, p. 623-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a preliminary study of the duration of rhoticity in coda-r words in American English. We note that traditional descriptions of American English phonology divide these words into two categories: words that end in a vowel followed by a separate /r/ segment (plus possible final consonant), and words that end in an r-colored vowel (plus possible final consonant). R-colored central vowels are termed here stressed and unstressed schwar. Recordings of 15 speakers of American English producing tokens containing these types of vowels were acoustically analysed, and the durations of the rhotic parts of the tokens were measured. The results demonstrated that stressed schwars were usually completely rhotic, unstressed schwars were usually not completely rhotic, but still had on average longer rhotic portions than the vowels+/r/. These findings have implications for intervention with /r/ disorders, which are encountered commonly in child speech disorders. It is argued that if these findings are borne out in a broader study, there might be no need to teach two different types of coda-r in therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR and FRANCIS INC, 2015
Keywords
American English; rhoticity; schwar; vowel plus /r/
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121923 (URN)10.3109/02699206.2015.1044674 (DOI)000361313400005 ()26169604 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-12 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Müller, N. & Ball, M. (2015). Clinical linguistics (and phonetics) (2ed.). In: Caroline Bowen (Ed.), Children's speech sound disorders: (pp. 28-31). Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical linguistics (and phonetics)
2015 (English)In: Children's speech sound disorders / [ed] Caroline Bowen, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, 2, p. 28-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015 Edition: 2
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115578 (URN)978-04-7072-364-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-03-17 Created: 2015-03-17 Last updated: 2016-03-24
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4405-5340

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