liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Klawonn, A., Fritz, M., Nilsson, A., Bonaventura, J., Shionoya, K., Mirrasekhian, E., . . . Engblom, D. (2018). Motivational valence is determined by striatal melanocortin 4 receptors. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 128(7), 3160-3170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivational valence is determined by striatal melanocortin 4 receptors
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 128, no 7, p. 3160-3170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is critical for survival to assign positive or negative valence to salient stimuli in a correct manner. Accordingly, harmful stimuli and internal states characterized by perturbed homeostasis are accompanied by discomfort, unease, and aversion. Aversive signaling causes extensive suffering during chronic diseases, including inflammatory conditions, cancer, and depression. Here, we investigated the role of melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4Rs) in aversive processing using genetically modified mice and a behavioral test in which mice avoid an environment that they have learned to associate with aversive stimuli. In normal mice, robust aversions were induced by systemic inflammation, nausea, pain, and. opioid receptorinduced dysphoria. In sharp contrast, mice lacking MC4Rs displayed preference or indifference toward the aversive stimuli. The unusual flip from aversion to reward in mice lacking MC4Rs was dopamine dependent and associated with a change from decreased to increased activity of the dopamine system. The responses to aversive stimuli were normalized when MC4Rs were reexpressed on dopamine D1 receptor-expressing cells or in the striatum of mice otherwise lacking MC4Rs. Furthermore, activation of arcuate nucleus proopiomelanocortin neurons projecting to the ventral striatum increased the activity of striatal neurons in an MC4R-dependent manner and elicited aversion. Our findings demonstrate that melanocortin signaling through striatal MC4Rs is critical for assigning negative motivational valence to harmful stimuli.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SOC CLINICAL INVESTIGATION INC, 2018
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149861 (URN)10.1172/JCI97854 (DOI)000437234600044 ()29911992 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council; Swedish Medical Research Council; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Brain foundation; County Council of Ostergotland; National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program [ZIA000069]; Lars Hiertas Minne Foundation

Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2018-08-20
Mirrasekhian, E., Nilsson, J. L. Å., Shionoya, K., Blomgren, A., Zygmunt, P. M., Engblom, D., . . . Blomqvist, A. (2018). The antipyretic effect of paracetamol occurs independent of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1–mediated hypothermia and is associated with prostaglandin inhibition in the brain. The FASEB Journal
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The antipyretic effect of paracetamol occurs independent of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1–mediated hypothermia and is associated with prostaglandin inhibition in the brain
Show others...
2018 (English)In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mode of action of paracetamol (acetaminophen), which is widely used for treating pain and fever, has remained obscure, but may involve several distinct mechanisms, including cyclooxygenase inhibition and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel activation, the latter being recently associated with paracetamol?s propensity to elicit hypothermia at higher doses. Here, we examined whether the antipyretic effect of paracetamol was due to TRPA1 activation or cyclooxygenase inhibition. Treatment of wild-type and TRPA1 knockout mice rendered febrile by immune challenge with LPS with a dose of paracetamol that did not produce hypothermia (150 mg/kg) but is known to be analgetic, abolished fever in both genotypes. Paracetamol completely suppressed the LPS-induced elevation of prostaglandin E2 in the brain and also reduced the levels of several other prostanoids. The hypothermia induced by paracetamol was abolished in mice treated with the electrophile-scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. We conclude that paracetamol?s antipyretic effect in mice is dependent on inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity, including the formation of pyrogenic prostaglandin E2, whereas paracetamol-induced hypothermia likely is mediated by the activation of TRPA1 by electrophilic metabolites of paracetamol, similar to its analgesic effect in some experimental paradigms.?Mirrasekhian, E., Nilsson, J. L. Å., Shionoya, K., Blomgren, A., Zygmunt, P. M., Engblom, D., Högestätt, E. D., Blomqvist, A. The antipyretic effect of paracetamol occurs independent of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1?mediated hypothermia and is associated with prostaglandin inhibition in the brain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, 2018
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148562 (URN)10.1096/fj.201800272R (DOI)000447972500045 ()29738273 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Medical Research Council [20725, 07879, 2014-3801]; European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Brain Foundation; Swedish Cancer Foundation [16/0572]; County Council of Ostergotland; Medical Facult

Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-11-09Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, A., Wilhelms, D., Mirrasekhian, E., Jaarola, M., Blomqvist, A. & Engblom, D. (2017). Inflammation-induced anorexia and fever are elicited by distinct prostaglandin dependent mechanisms, whereas conditioned taste aversion is prostaglandin independent.. Brain, behavior, and immunity, 61, 236-243, Article ID S0889-1591(16)30549-9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammation-induced anorexia and fever are elicited by distinct prostaglandin dependent mechanisms, whereas conditioned taste aversion is prostaglandin independent.
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 61, p. 236-243, article id S0889-1591(16)30549-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Systemic inflammation evokes an array of brain-mediated responses including fever, anorexia and taste aversion. Both fever and anorexia are prostaglandin dependent but it has been unclear if the cell-type that synthesizes the critical prostaglandins is the same. Here we show that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, but not of COX-1, attenuates inflammation-induced anorexia. Mice with deletions of COX-2 selectively in brain endothelial cells displayed attenuated fever, as demonstrated previously, but intact anorexia in response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide (10μg/kg). Whereas intracerebroventricular injection of a cyclooxygenase inhibitor markedly reduced anorexia, deletion of COX-2 selectively in neural cells, in myeloid cells or in both brain endothelial and neural cells had no effect on LPS-induced anorexia. In addition, COX-2 in myeloid and neural cells was dispensable for the fever response. Inflammation-induced conditioned taste aversion did not involve prostaglandin signaling at all. These findings collectively show that anorexia, fever and taste aversion are triggered by distinct routes of immune-to-brain signaling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Anorexia, Conditioned place aversion, Cyclooxygenase, Fever, Inflammation, Lipopolysaccharide
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136127 (URN)10.1016/j.bbi.2016.12.007 (DOI)000395365900026 ()27940259 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Medical Research Council [20725, 07879]; European Research Council; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; Swedish Brain Foundation; Swedish Cancer Foundation [213/692]; County Council of Ostergotland

Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
Svensson, J., Bhai Mehta, R., Lindau, R., Mirrasekhian, E., Rodriguez-Martinez, H., Berg, G., . . . Ernerudh, J. (2015). The Human Fetal Placenta Promotes Tolerance against the Semiallogeneic Fetus by Inducing Regulatory T Cells and Homeostatic M2 Macrophages. Journal of Immunology, 194(4), 1534-1544
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Human Fetal Placenta Promotes Tolerance against the Semiallogeneic Fetus by Inducing Regulatory T Cells and Homeostatic M2 Macrophages
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 194, no 4, p. 1534-1544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A successful pregnancy requires that the maternal immune system is instructed to a state of tolerance to avoid rejection of the semiallogeneic fetal-placental unit. Although increasing evidence supports that decidual (uterine) macrophages and regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulators of fetal tolerance, it is not known how these tolerogenic leukocytes are induced. In this article, we show that the human fetal placenta itself, mainly through trophoblast cells, is able to induce homeostatic M2 macrophages and Tregs. Placental-derived M-CSF and IL-10 induced macrophages that shared the CD14(+)CD163(+)CD206(+)CD209(+) phenotype of decidual macrophages and produced IL-10 and CCL18 but not IL-12 or IL-23. Placental tissue also induced the expansion of CD25(high)CD127(low)Foxp3(+) Tregs in parallel with increased IL-10 production, whereas production of IFN-gamma (Th1), IL-13 (Th2), and IL-17 (Th17) was not induced. Tregs expressed the suppressive markers CTLA-4 and CD39, were functionally suppressive, and were induced, in part, by IL-10, TGF-beta, and TRAIL. Placental-derived factors also limited excessive Th cell activation, as shown by decreased HLA-DR expression and reduced secretion of Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-associated cytokines. Thus, our data indicate that the fetal placenta has a central role in promoting the homeostatic environment necessary for successful pregnancy. These findings have implications for immune-mediated pregnancy complications, as well as for our general understanding of tissue-induced tolerance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Immunologists, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115319 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.1401536 (DOI)000349462000017 ()25560409 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council [K2013-61X-22310-01-4]

Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2020-01-16
Björk Wilhelms, D., Mirrasekhian, E. & Engblom, D. (2014). Cyclooxygenase isoform exchange blocks inflammatory symptoms.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cyclooxygenase isoform exchange blocks inflammatory symptoms
2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cyclooxygenase‐2 (COX‐2) is the main source of inducible prostaglandin E2 production and mediates inflammatory symptoms including fever, loss of appetite and hyperalgesia. In contrast, COX‐1 is dispensable for most inflammatory symptoms. Global deletion of COX‐2 leads to a blockade of inflammation‐induced fever and appetite loss but also to high rates of fetal mortality. The latter is unfortunate since mice without COX‐2 are powerful tools in the study of inflammation and cardiovascular medicine. The differential functionality of the COX isoforms could be due to differences in regulatory regions of the genes, leading to different expression patterns, or to differences in the coding sequence, leading to distinct functional properties of the proteins. To study this in the context of inflammatory symptoms, we used mice in which the coding sequence of COX‐2 was replaced by the corresponding sequence of COX‐1. In these mice, COX‐1 mRNA was induced by inflammation but COX‐1 protein expression did not fully mimic inflammation‐induced COX‐2 expression. Just like mice globally lacking COX‐2, these mice showed a complete lack of fever and inflammation‐induced anorexia. However, as previously reported, they displayed close to normal survival rates. This shows that the COX activity generated from the hybrid gene was strong enough to allow survival but not strong enough to mediate inflammatory symptoms, making the line an interesting alternative to COX‐2 knockouts for the study of inflammation. Our results also show that the functional differences between COX‐1 and COX‐2 in the context of inflammatory symptoms is not only dependent on the features of the promoter regions. Instead they indicate that there are fundamental differences between the isoforms at translational or posttranslational levels, which make hybrid genes less functional.

National Category
Cell Biology Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111725 (URN)
Available from: 2014-10-29 Created: 2014-10-29 Last updated: 2015-11-06Bibliographically approved
Wilhelms, D. B., Kirilov, M., Mirrasekhian, E., Eskilsson, A., Örtegren Kugelberg, U., Klar, C., . . . Engblom, D. (2014). Deletion of Prostaglandin E-2 Synthesizing Enzymes in Brain Endothelial Cells Attenuates Inflammatory Fever. Journal of Neuroscience, 34(35), 11684-11690
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deletion of Prostaglandin E-2 Synthesizing Enzymes in Brain Endothelial Cells Attenuates Inflammatory Fever
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 34, no 35, p. 11684-11690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fever is a hallmark of inflammatory and infectious diseases. The febrile response is triggered by prostaglandin E-2 synthesis mediated by induced expression of the enzymes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). The cellular source for pyrogenic PGE(2) remains a subject of debate; several hypotheses have been forwarded, including immune cells in the periphery and in the brain, as well as the brain endothelium. Here we generated mice with selective deletion of COX-2 and mPGES1 in brain endothelial cells. These mice displayed strongly attenuated febrile responses to peripheral immune challenge. In contrast, inflammation-induced hypoactivity was unaffected, demonstrating the physiological selectivity of the response to the targeted gene deletions. These findings demonstrate that PGE(2) synthesis in brain endothelial cells is critical for inflammation-induced fever.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Neuroscience, 2014
Keywords
COX-2; endothelium; fever; mPGES-1; PGE(2); prostaglandin
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111281 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1838-14.2014 (DOI)000341314900017 ()25164664 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Medical Research Council; Swedish Cancer Foundation; European Research Council; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Brain foundation; County Council of stergotland; Wenner-Gren Fellowship

Available from: 2014-10-14 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Eskilsson, A., Mirrasekhian, E., Dufour, S., Schwaninger, M., Engblom, D. & Blomqvist, A. (2014). Immune-Induced Fever Is Mediated by IL-6 Receptors on Brain Endothelial Cells Coupled to STAT3-Dependent Induction of Brain Endothelial Prostaglandin Synthesis. Journal of Neuroscience, 34(48), 15957-15961
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immune-Induced Fever Is Mediated by IL-6 Receptors on Brain Endothelial Cells Coupled to STAT3-Dependent Induction of Brain Endothelial Prostaglandin Synthesis
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 34, no 48, p. 15957-15961Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cytokine IL-6, which is released upon peripheral immune challenge, is critical for the febrile response, but the mechanism by which IL-6 is pyrogenic has remained obscure. Herewegenerated mice with deletion of themembranebound IL-6 receptor alpha (IL-6R alpha) onneural cells, on peripheral nerves, on fine sensory afferent fibers, and on brain endothelial cells, respectively, and examined its role for the febrile response to peripherally injected lipopolysaccharide. We show that IL-6R alpha on neural cells, peripheral nerves, and fine sensory afferents are dispensable for the lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, whereas IL-6R alpha in the brain endothelium plays an important role. Hence deletion of IL-6R alpha on brain endothelial cells strongly attenuated the febrile response, and also led to reduced induction of the prostaglandin synthesizing enzyme Cox-2 in the hypothalamus, the temperature-regulating center in the brain, as well as reduced expression of SOCS3, suggesting involvement of the STAT signaling pathway. Furthermore, deletion of STAT3 in the brain endothelium also resulted in attenuated fever. These data show that IL-6, when endogenously released during systemic inflammation, is pyrogenic by binding to IL-6R alpha on brain endothelial cells to induce prostaglandin synthesis in these cells, probably in concerted action with other peripherally released cytokines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Neuroscience, 2014
Keywords
blood-brain barrier; cell-specific gene deletions; fever; interleukin-6; prostaglandins; STAT3
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113199 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3520-14.2014 (DOI)000345923600013 ()25429137 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Medical Research Council; Swedish Cancer Foundation; European Research Council; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Brain foundation; County CouncilO Ostergotland

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2020-01-08
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2245-3396

Search in DiVA

Show all publications