liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Bandick, Roger
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Bandick, R. (2016). Offshoring, Plant Survival and Employment Growth. The World Economy, 39(5), 597-620
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Offshoring, Plant Survival and Employment Growth
2016 (English)In: The World Economy, ISSN 0378-5920, E-ISSN 1467-9701, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 597-620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130306 (URN)10.1111/twec.12316 (DOI)000378632100002 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Touborg Foundation

Available from: 2016-07-31 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Bandick, R., Görg, H. & Karpaty, P. (2014). Foreign acquisitions, domestic multinationals, and R&D. Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 116(4), 1091-1115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foreign acquisitions, domestic multinationals, and R&D
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 1091-1115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our aim in this paper is to evaluate the causal effect of foreign acquisition on research and development (R&D) intensity in targeted domestic firms. We are able to distinguish domestic multinational enterprises (MNEs) and non-MNEs, which allows us to investigate the fear that the change in ownership of domestic MNEs to foreign MNEs leads to a reduction in R&D activity in the country. Overall, our results give no support to the fears that foreign acquisition of domestic firms leads to a relocation of R&D activity in Swedish MNEs. Rather, in this paper, we find robust evidence that foreign acquisitions lead to increasing R&D intensity in acquired domestic MNEs and non-MNEs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
Foreign acquisitions; multinational firms; R&D; F23; L10
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114793 (URN)10.1111/sjoe.12071 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Bandick, R. (2014). Global Activities and Plant Survival: The Case of Sweden. In: Anna Maria Ferragina, Erol Taymaz, Kamil Yilmaz (Ed.), Innovation, globalization and firm dynamics : lessons for enterprise policy: . Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Activities and Plant Survival: The Case of Sweden
2014 (English)In: Innovation, globalization and firm dynamics : lessons for enterprise policy / [ed] Anna Maria Ferragina, Erol Taymaz, Kamil Yilmaz, Routledge, 2014, p. -35Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter provides an extensive review of the empirical evidence found for Sweden concerning plant survival. The result reveals that foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants have the lowest exit rates, followed by purely domestic-oriented plants, and that domestic MNE plants have the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired exporters, but not other types of plants, improves post acquisition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2014
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114807 (URN)978-04-1583-677-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2015-03-20
Bandick, R. & Karpaty, P. (2011). Employment effects of foreign acquisition. International Review of Economics and Finance, 20(2), 211-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Employment effects of foreign acquisition
2011 (English)In: International Review of Economics and Finance, ISSN 1059-0560, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 211-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates the employment effects of foreign acquisitions in acquired firms in Swedish manufacturing during the 1990s; a period characterized by a dramatic increase in foreign ownership. We find some evidence of positive employment effects in acquired firms and it seems that the employment of skilled labor increases more than that of less-skilled labor. Our results indicate that the positive employment effects are more pronounced in acquired non-MNEs than in Swedish MNEs. Furthermore, we observe shifts in skill intensities toward higher shares of skilled labor in non-MNEs taken over by foreign MNEs, but not in acquired Swedish MNEs.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114795 (URN)10.1016/j.iref.2010.06.001 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2016-12-29
Bandick, R. (2011). Foreign Acquisition, Wages and Productivity. The World Economy, 34(6), 931-951
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foreign Acquisition, Wages and Productivity
2011 (English)In: The World Economy, ISSN 0378-5920, E-ISSN 1467-9701, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 931-951Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper studies the effect of foreign acquisition on wages and total factor productivity (TFP) in the years following a takeover by using unique detailed firm-level data for Sweden for the period 1993–2002. The paper takes particular account of potential endogeneity of the acquisition decision (for example, due to ‘cherry picking’) by implementing an instrumental variable approach and propensity score matching with difference-in-difference estimation. Moreover, in line with the recent literature on firm heterogeneity and trade, this paper allows for the acquisition effect to differ depending on whether the targeted firms were domestic multinational or non-multinationals before the foreign takeover. This paper also allows for the acquisition effect to differ depending on whether the acquisition is horizontal or vertical. Our results show that foreign acquisition has no effects on overall, skilled or less-skilled wage growth, either in targeted Swedish MNEs or in targeted Swedish non-MNEs or if the acquisition was motivated by vertical or horizontal motives. However, the results indicate that both targeted Swedish MNEs and non-MNEs have better growth in TFP after vertical foreign acquisition only but no such impact from horizontal foreign acquisition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114792 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9701.2011.01345.x (DOI)000292544100003 ()
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Bandick, R., Görg, H. & Karpaty, P. (2011). What happens to R&D in domestic multinationals after foreign acquisition?.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What happens to R&D in domestic multinationals after foreign acquisition?
2011 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114811 (URN)
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2015-03-20
Bandick, R. & Görg, H. (2010). Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth. Canadian Journal of Economics, 43(2), 547-573
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foreign acquisition, plant survival, and employment growth
2010 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0008-4085, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 547-573Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes the effect of foreign acquisition on survival and employment growth of targets using data on Swedish manufacturing plants. We separate targeted plants into those within Swedish MNEs, Swedish exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. The results, controlling for possible endogeneity of acquisition using IV and propensity score matching approaches suggest that acquisition by foreign owners increases the lifetime of the acquired plants only if the plant was an exporter. The effect is robust to controlling for domestic acquisitions and differs between horizontal and vertical acquisitions. We find robust positive employment growth effects only for exporters and only if the takeover is vertical.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114797 (URN)10.1111/j.1540-5982.2010.01583.x (DOI)
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2016-09-26
Bandick, R. (2010). Multinationals and plant survival. Review of World Economics, 146(4), 609-634
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multinationals and plant survival
2010 (English)In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 146, no 4, p. 609-634Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate how different ownership structures affect plant survival, and second, to analyze how the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) affects domestic plants’ survival. Using a unique and detailed data set on the Swedish manufacturing sector, I am able to separate plants into those owned by foreign MNEs, domestic MNEs, exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. In line with previous findings, the result, when conditioned on other factors affecting survival, shows that foreign MNE plants have lower survival rates than non-MNE plants. However, separating the non-MNEs into exporters and non-exporters, the result shows that foreign MNE plants have higher survival rates than non-exporting non-MNEs, while the survival rates of foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants do not seem to differ. Moreover, the simple non-parametric estimates show that domestic MNE plants are more likely to exit the market than other plants, also when controlling for plant-specific differences. Finally, foreign presence in the market seems to have had a negative impact on the survival rate of plants in non-exporting non-MNEs, but not to have affected plants in exporting non-MNEs or plants in domestic MNEs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2010
Keywords
Survival; Multinational enterprises; Heterogeneity
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114808 (URN)10.1007/s10290-010-0068-4 (DOI)000285097600001 ()
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Bandick, R. & Hansson, P. (2009). Inward FDI and demand for skills in manufacturing firms in Sweden. Review of World Economics, 145(1), 111-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inward FDI and demand for skills in manufacturing firms in Sweden
2009 (English)In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 145, no 1, p. 111-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We observe a substantial increase in foreign ownership in Sweden in the 1990s. Did that have any effect on relative demand for skilled labor? Has technology transfers-often associated with inward FDI-led to an increased demand for skills due to skilled-biased technical change? Are there any grounds for the concerns in the public Swedish debate that more skilled activities have been moved to other countries where the headquarters are located? Estimating relative labor demand at the firm level and using propensity score matching with difference-in-difference estimation, we obtain support for that relative demand for skilled labor tend to rise in non-multinationals (non-MNEs)-but not in multinationals (MNEs)-that become foreign-owned. Other interesting findings are that larger presence of foreign MNEs in an industry appears to have a positive impact on the relative demand for skills in Swedish MNEs within the same industry and that the elasticity of substitution between skilled and less-skilled labor seems to be lower in MNEs than in non-MNEs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2009
Keywords
Foreign ownership; Skill upgrading; Wage differentials
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114809 (URN)10.1007/s10290-009-0002-9 (DOI)000265083800007 ()
Available from: 2015-03-04 Created: 2015-03-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications