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Che, C., Vagin, M., Ail, U., Gueskine, V., Phopase, J., Brooke, R., . . . Crispin, X. (2019). Twinning Lignosulfonate with a Conducting Polymer via Counter-Ion Exchange for Large-Scale Electrical Storage. Advanced Sustainable Systems, 3(9), Article ID 1900039.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Twinning Lignosulfonate with a Conducting Polymer via Counter-Ion Exchange for Large-Scale Electrical Storage
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2019 (English)In: Advanced Sustainable Systems, ISSN 2366-7486, Vol. 3, no 9, article id 1900039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Lignosulfonate (LS) is a large-scale surplus product of the forest and paper industries, and has primarily been utilized as a low-cost plasticizer in making concrete for the construction industry. LS is an anionic redox-active polyelectrolyte and is a promising candidate to boost the charge capacity of the positive electrode (positrode) in redox-supercapacitors. Here, the physical-chemical investigation of how this biopolymer incorporates into the conducting polymer PEDOT matrix, of the positrode, by means of counter-ion exchange is reported. Upon successful incorporation, an optimal access to redox moieties is achieved, which provides a 63% increase of the resulting stored electrical charge by reversible redox interconversion. The effects of pH, ionic strength, and concentrations, of included components, on the polymer?polymer interactions are optimized to exploit the biopolymer-associated redox currents. Further, the explored LS-conducting polymer incorporation strategy, via aqueous synthesis, is evaluated in an up-scaling effort toward large-scale electrical energy storage technology. By using an up-scaled production protocol, integration of the biopolymer within the conducting polymer matrix by counter-ion exchange is confirmed and the PEDOT-LS synthesized through optimized strategy reaches an improved charge capacity of 44.6 mAh g?1.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
charge storage, conducting polymers, ion-exchange, lignin
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161646 (URN)10.1002/adsu.201900039 (DOI)000486210400005 ()2-s2.0-85072220289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-05 Created: 2019-11-05 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Wijeratne, K., Ail, U., Brooke, R., Vagin, M., Liu, X., Fahlman, M. & Crispin, X. (2018). Bulk electronic transport impacts on electron transfer at conducting polymer electrode-electrolyte interfaces.. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (7), 11899-11904
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bulk electronic transport impacts on electron transfer at conducting polymer electrode-electrolyte interfaces.
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, no 7, p. 11899-11904Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electrochemistry is an old but still flourishing field of research due to the importance of the efficiency and kinetics of electrochemical reactions in industrial processes and (bio-)electrochemical devices. The heterogeneous electron transfer from an electrode to a reactant in the solution has been well studied for metal, semiconductor, metal oxide, and carbon electrodes. For those electrode materials, there is little correlation between the electronic transport within the electrode material and the electron transfer occurring at the interface between the electrode and the solution. Here, we investigate the heterogeneous electron transfer between a conducting polymer electrode and a redox couple in an electrolyte. As a benchmark system, we use poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and the Ferro/ferricyanide redox couple in an aqueous electrolyte. We discovered a strong correlation between the electronic transport within the PEDOT electrode and the rate of electron transfer to the organometallic molecules in solution. We attribute this to a percolation-based charge transport within the polymer electrode directly involved in the electron transfer. We show the impact of this finding by optimizing an electrochemical thermogalvanic cell that transforms a heat flux into electrical power. The power generated by the cell increased by four orders of magnitude on changing the morphology and conductivity of the polymer electrode. As all conducting polymers are recognized to have percolation transport, we believe that this is a general phenomenon for this family of conductors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National academy of sciences, 2018
Keywords
conducting polymer, electron transfer, thermogalvanic cell
National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152759 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1806087115 (DOI)000450642800036 ()30397110 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University Faculty Grant [SFO-Mat-LiU 2009-00971]

Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-12-04
Wang, H., Ail, U., Gabrielsson, R., Berggren, M. & Crispin, X. (2015). Ionic Seebeck Effect in Conducting Polymers. ADVANCED ENERGY MATERIALS, 5(11), Article ID 1500044.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ionic Seebeck Effect in Conducting Polymers
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2015 (English)In: ADVANCED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 1614-6832, Vol. 5, no 11, article id 1500044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conducting polymers display an ionic thermoelectric effect in addition to the known electronic thermoelectric effect. Their Seebeck coefficient is as large as ≈200 μV K−1. This finding discloses a new possible approach to improve the thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers by combining various types of charge carriers of the same sign.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2015
Keywords
conducting polymers; ionic Seebeck effect; thermoelectric materials
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119790 (URN)10.1002/aenm.201500044 (DOI)000355753300005 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council (ERC-Starting-Grant) [307596]; Swedish foundation for strategic research; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; Swedish Energy Agency; Advanced Functional Materials Center at Linkoping University

Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-20
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2930-676X

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