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Henriksson, F. (2018). Integrated Product and Production Research on Introducing Internet of Things in Swedish Wood Industry Products. Paper presented at SPS2018. Procedia Manufacturing, 25, 10-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated Product and Production Research on Introducing Internet of Things in Swedish Wood Industry Products
2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To enable transitioning the Swedish economy into a bioeconomy, Swedish wood industry need to increase added value and introduce new products to market by introducing new technology and improving the product and production development processes. Research in automotive industry have shown the need for integrating product and production development when introducing new technology in existing production systems, and have indicated a possibility of using specifically designed student case projects in order to generate qualitative data. In this paper, one student case project on product and production development in the Swedish wood industry, involving IoT wood products, is presented and evaluated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Product system development, Case studies, Modularization, Smart products, Customer benefit, University as a Laboratory
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155049 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.051 (DOI)
Conference
SPS2018
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-07-26Bibliographically approved
Detterfelt, J. & Henriksson, F. (2018). Production – as seen in product development: A theoretical review of how established product development process models address the production system. In: Ekströmer, Philip; Schütte, Simon and Ölvander, Johan (Ed.), DS 91: Proceedings of NordDesign 2018: DESIGN IN THE ERA OF DIGITALIZATION. Paper presented at NordDesign. Scotland: The Design Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production – as seen in product development: A theoretical review of how established product development process models address the production system
2018 (English)In: DS 91: Proceedings of NordDesign 2018: DESIGN IN THE ERA OF DIGITALIZATION / [ed] Ekströmer, Philip; Schütte, Simon and Ölvander, Johan, Scotland: The Design Society, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is a well-known fact that collaboration between design and production during product development is a critical success factor. Literature on product development have described many different product development processes (PDP), but engineering students are in general only taught one or a few of the existing models. Given this, it is interesting to investigate how established (and often used) PDP models address production and the development of the production system, since this could influence the presumptions of engineers in industry as well as academic researchers (who in general have been engineering students before pursuing an academic career). In this paper, the authors have reviewed seven established and commonly used (in mechanical engineering education and/or research) PDP models, with respect to how the models address the production system and its development. The models are reviewed with respect to what the PDP model describe as the content of the PDP, inclusion of the development of the production system in the model, the presentation of support tools for production related activities, the level of references or mentioning of production system development theories, the visibility of data transfer needs between product and production system development and the strategic role of production in product development. This analysis shows that production system development is mentioned less in more recent literature but is generally scarcely described. Design for manufacturing and design for assembly tools have been added to more recent literature, which might be a way of managing the decreased inclusion of production system development. Finally, an outline for future research efforts on the topic is presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scotland: The Design Society, 2018
Series
DS ; 91
Keywords
Product development processes, Production development, Integrated product and production development, Engineering design, New product development
National Category
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153121 (URN)978-91-7685-185-2 (ISBN)
Conference
NordDesign
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2019-03-29
Henriksson, F., Johansen, K. & Wilhelmsson, M. (2018). University as a Laboratory: Exploring how engineering education can support industrial needs. In: Ekströmer, Philip; Schütte, Simon and Ölvander, Johan (Ed.), NordDesign 2018: DESIGN IN THE ERA OF DIGITALIZATION. Paper presented at NordDesign, Linköping, Sweden, August 14-17, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>University as a Laboratory: Exploring how engineering education can support industrial needs
2018 (English)In: NordDesign 2018: DESIGN IN THE ERA OF DIGITALIZATION / [ed] Ekströmer, Philip; Schütte, Simon and Ölvander, Johan, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Universities have two major tasks; generating knowledge through research and educating students for academia, the public sector and the industry. In this paper, the authors explore how engineering education can support industrial needs on two fronts: creating a case study platform for research and preparing graduating engineering students to become more capable engineers when beginning their working life in industry, by applying the ""University as a laboratory"" concept. ""University as a laboratory"", as coined by Henriksson (2017), means that research-based case study projects are brought into educational courses where students are assigned to work as engineering designers, and researchers can observe problem solving patterns and evaluate different methodologies (also presented by Henriksson and Johansen (2016)). Though the concept have been presented earlier (Henriksson and Johansen 2016, Henriksson 2017), a more thorough evaluation is in order to further understand the effects of integrating research and education in the ""University as a laboratory"" concept. This is done through the performance and evaluation of a research-based engineering design education project in collaboration with automotive industrial partners; a project on lightweight and sustainable product and production development. The study evaluates three aspects of the project; the researchers' view, the teachers' view and the students' view. Data on all three aspects has been gathered through group interviews, observations and written assignments during the project, as well as interviews with participating students one year after the end of the project and workshops with researchers and teachers involved in the project. Analysis has been done on a qualitative basis, to investigate whether case projects are suitable for deep understanding in engineering fields and whether project courses are suitable to test different approaches of integrated product and production development.

Series
DS ; 91
Keywords
Engineering education, Case studies, Integrated product and production development, Automotive industry, student perspective
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155043 (URN)978-91-7685-185-2 (ISBN)
Conference
NordDesign, Linköping, Sweden, August 14-17, 2018.
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, F. (2017). Introducing New Materials in the Automotive Industry: Managing the Complexity of Introducing New Materials in Existing Production Systems. (Licentiate dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing New Materials in the Automotive Industry: Managing the Complexity of Introducing New Materials in Existing Production Systems
2017 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Passenger vehicles are central to Western society, and contribute to a significant part of our greenhouse gas emissions. In order to reduce emissions, the automotive industry as a whole is working to reduce mass in passenger vehicles in order to reduce energy consumption. One way to reduce mass is to introduce lightweight materials in the body of the vehicle. This research aims to explore the relationship between product and production system when introducing new materials.

Besides a theoretical review and an industry-centered technological mapping, four case studies have been conducted during the course of this licentiate thesis. Two case studies were conducted with engineering design students working as development teams, one case study with the author as the developer and finally one case study in an industrial environment at a product owning company with in-house production. The goal of the case studies has been to increase the collective knowledge of how product development decisions affect production development decisions, and vice versa, when developing passenger vehicles in new materials.

In the following analysis of case study outcomes, a number of factors important for introducing new materials are discussed. The relationship between product and production is investigated, both in terms of how the production system affects the product and how the product affects the production system. The outcome from this analysis is a mapping of important factors for automotive industry companies to understand and identify when looking at introducing new materials in existing production systems. Finally, a suggestion for future research efforts is presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017. p. 135
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1793
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142873 (URN)10.3384/lic.diva-142873 (DOI)9789176853979 (ISBN)
Presentation
2017-11-09, ACAS, A-huset, Campus Valla, Linköping, 09:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2019-10-12Bibliographically approved
Kurdve, M., Henriksson, F., Wiktorsson, M., Denzler, P., Zachrisson, M. & Bjelkemyr, M. (2017). Production system and material efficiency challenges for large scale introduction of complex materials. Advanced Materials Proceedings, 2(8), 492-499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production system and material efficiency challenges for large scale introduction of complex materials
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Advanced Materials Proceedings, ISSN 2002-4428, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 492-499Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper links production system research to advanced material research for the vehicle industry. Facilitated by need for reduction of fuel use, the automotive industry is pushing a radical change from using steel structures to new mixed materials structures. In production systems optimised for steel, the changes will affect productivity and material efficiency. Four industrial case studies focusing on production economy and productivity give implications of production technology demands on the material selection regarding new joining techniques and additive or forming methods which has to be investigated when considering new materials. Material efficiency analysis shows that minimising spill in production operations and regulatory demand of recycling need to be considered in material development, which implies both design for disassembly, advanced separation processes and use of recycled raw materials. To be successful in new material introduction, new information flows and knowledge sharing moving from operations and manufacturing development to materials development and design are needed. The material developers could use axiomatic design strategies to structure the production system demands on the materials. State of the art lightweight producers in vehicle and automotive industry are likely early adopters to advanced lightweight structures with need of information flows between material development and operations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping, Sweden: VBRI Press, 2017
Keywords
Mixed materials, material efficiency, light weight products, materials development, production system
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143015 (URN)10.5185/amp.2017/805 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-15Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, F. & Johansen, K. (2016). An outlook on multi material body solutions in the automotive industry – possibilities and manufacturing challenges. In: SAE Technical Paper Series: . Paper presented at SAE 2016 World Congress and Exhibition. Detroit (MI), USA: Society of Automotive Engineers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An outlook on multi material body solutions in the automotive industry – possibilities and manufacturing challenges
2016 (English)In: SAE Technical Paper Series, Detroit (MI), USA: Society of Automotive Engineers, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the automotive industry, mass reduction and lightweight design is a continuing trend that does not show signs of declining. When looking at where to reduce weight in a vehicle, the body is a preferential subsystem due to its large contribution to overall mass and the stability of body composition over a specific model range. The automotive industry of today moves toward a greater differentiation in materials that compose a car, which can be seen in the several different multi material vehicle bodies that have been introduced by manufacturers in recent years. But while mixing materials may contribute to a good compromise between weight reduction and vehicle cost, it also proposes a number of challenges that need to be addressed. Among other material factors, the different coefficients of thermal expansions might introduce new stresses during painting and curing. Joining processes and possible chemical reactions between materials also needs to be taken into account, the same with the question of whether to integrate or differentiate different functions in a system. If the manufacturing plant uses mixed model assembly lines, design of end effectors for gripping multiple different materials is another challenge not previously encountered in this context. In this paper, a number of production and manufacturing related challenges are discussed, and the authors highlight different areas where the requirements of design engineering tools needs to be evaluated for these new multi material concepts and design decisions in order for automotive manufacturers to ensure future market competitiveness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Detroit (MI), USA: Society of Automotive Engineers, 2016
Keywords
Multi material bodies, Production development, Product development
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127319 (URN)10.4271/2016-01-1332 (DOI)
Conference
SAE 2016 World Congress and Exhibition
Projects
Produktion2030 - Storskalig tillverkning av produkter i flera material
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2016-04-20 Created: 2016-04-20 Last updated: 2017-11-08Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, F. & Johansen, K. (2016). Including Student Case Projects in Integrated Product and Production Development Research – Methodology Description and Discussion. In: : . Paper presented at 7th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS, Lund, October 25-27, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Including Student Case Projects in Integrated Product and Production Development Research – Methodology Description and Discussion
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Within integrated product and production development research, casestudies needto be performed for data gathering purposes. Today, there are two commonly used ways to perform this research; observingindustry projects orhaving the researchers perform the projects themselves. The first option can pose data access and IPRissues, and the second optioncomes with biasing risks. Another approach is to work with studentcaseprojects, givingstudents interesting projects and findinga solution to mediate both data gathering opportunity and biasing risks. This approach has been tested at Linköping University, with students performing projects in the Vinnovafunded Production 2030 –Large Scale Production in Mixed Materials project. Two larger student case projects have been performed on the topic of material substitution and mixed material solutions within the automotive industry.In this paper, the method used to include student projects is presented along with identified benefits and drawbacks. Including student case projects in research have shown to be beneficial in research on processes, projects and methodology, but needs to be complemented by data fromindustry projects and the researcher ́s own work within integrated product and production development in order to create a more reliable analysis with high level of detail.

Keywords
Case studies, Integrated product and production development, mixed material solutions
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142930 (URN)
Conference
7th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS, Lund, October 25-27, 2016
Funder
VINNOVA
Note

Fulltexten i denna post har endast gjorts tillgänglig via DiVA.

The full text of this entry has only been made available via DiVA.

Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2017-11-20
Henriksson, F. & Johansen, K. (2016). On Material Substitution in Automotive BIWs – From Steel to Aluminum Body Sides. In: Wang, Lihui; Kjellberg, Torsten (Ed.), 26TH CIRP DESIGN CONFERENCE: . Paper presented at 26th CIRP Design Conference (pp. 683-688). Elsevier, 50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Material Substitution in Automotive BIWs – From Steel to Aluminum Body Sides
2016 (English)In: 26TH CIRP DESIGN CONFERENCE / [ed] Wang, Lihui; Kjellberg, Torsten, Elsevier, 2016, Vol. 50, p. 683-688Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Weight reduction and material substitution are increasing trends in the automotive industry. In this project, the task of substituting the steel body side in the monocoque of a large SUV towards an aluminum body side was investigated through a design engineering approach adopting a breadth-first analysis method. One conclusion based on the analysis is that the choice of joining technology would become arbitrary due to the breadth-first approach. In this paper, the authors present their findings from the aforementioned case, including the challenges with switching between materials with fundamentally different properties when performing material substitution projects. The possibility of having taken a depth-first analysis approach, and the possible effects on the project result, is discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Series
Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271 ; 50
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130510 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2016.05.028 (DOI)000387666600115 ()
Conference
26th CIRP Design Conference
Projects
Produktion 2030 - Storskalig tillverkning av produkter i flera material
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2016-08-11 Created: 2016-08-11 Last updated: 2017-11-08
Henriksson, F. & Johansen, K. (2015). Product development in the Swedish Automotive industry: Can design tools be viewed as decision support systems?. In: Anthony SF Chiu (Ed.), : . Paper presented at The 23rd International Conference on Production Research (ICPR 2015), Manila, Philippines, 2-5 August 2015. International Foundation for Production Research (IFPR)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Product development in the Swedish Automotive industry: Can design tools be viewed as decision support systems?
2015 (English)In: / [ed] Anthony SF Chiu, International Foundation for Production Research (IFPR) , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Design engineers working in the automotive industry have to take many design decisions, based on numerous diverse criteria. This results in a high workload of complex decisions. One way to reduce decision complexity and improve decisions could be to improve design tools. Decision support systems (DSSs) have been used in a managerial context to improve decisions. In this article, the authors assess whether design tools generally can be viewed as DSSs. A combination of literature review, surveys and qualitative interviews with seven design engineers was used to assess whether current design tools function as decision supports in product development. Although the specific design context needs to be considered, this study’s results suggest that design tools can generally function as DSSs. In future work, the adaptability to different problem solving patterns needs further in-depth research in the form of individual studies for specific tools in specific contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Foundation for Production Research (IFPR), 2015
Keywords
engineering design, design tools, product development, automotive industry
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126167 (URN)
Conference
The 23rd International Conference on Production Research (ICPR 2015), Manila, Philippines, 2-5 August 2015
Projects
Production 2030 - Large Scale Manufacturing in Mixed Materials
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2016-04-11Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, F. & Johansen, K. (2014). Towards Applying The Boothroyd, Dewhurst and Knight Methodology for Cost Estimation on Fibre Composite Manufacturing - A Theoretical Approach. In: Johan Stahre, Björn Johansson, Mats Björkman (Ed.), Proceedings of The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014: . Paper presented at The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014, September 16-18, Gothenburg, Sweden. Gothenburg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Applying The Boothroyd, Dewhurst and Knight Methodology for Cost Estimation on Fibre Composite Manufacturing - A Theoretical Approach
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014 / [ed] Johan Stahre, Björn Johansson, Mats Björkman, Gothenburg, 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increased usage of carbon fibre composite poses challenges for the automotive industry; one is to manage carbon fibre composites within the product development process. This paper combines knowledge in design engineering, material science and production technology, aiming to bridge these domains. The study indicates that mass production methods suitable for carbon fibre have several factors in common with traditional polymer production methods. Thus, it is possible that DfMA methods for traditional polymer production can be adjusted for carbon fibre composite production. The result is summarised in a table aiming to facilitate engineering decisions related to cost estimations for composite moulding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gothenburg: , 2014
Series
International Swedish Production Symposium ; 6
Keywords
DfMA, Carbon Fibre Composites
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120841 (URN)978-91-980974-1-2 (ISBN)
Conference
The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014, September 16-18, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2015-08-27 Created: 2015-08-27 Last updated: 2017-03-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4170-8860

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