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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Sposato, N., Shaw, R. & Bjerså, K. (2018). Addressing the ongoing friction between anecdotal and evidence-based teachings in osteopathic education in Europe. Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, 22(3), 553-555
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing the ongoing friction between anecdotal and evidence-based teachings in osteopathic education in Europe
2018 (English)In: Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, ISSN 1360-8592, E-ISSN 1532-9283, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 553-555Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite a growing interest in research and the implementation of standards for osteopathic education and practice in Europe, the inter-professional dialogue remains insubstantial. This article calls attention to the continuous challenges of reconciling anecdotal and evidence-based perspectives and offers suggestions on how to address these areas further.

National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155857 (URN)10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.05.006 (DOI)30100275 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-03-29
Sposato, N. S. & Bjerså, K. (2018). Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment in Surgical Care: Short Review of Research Publications in Osteopathic Journals During the Period 1990 to 2017. Journal of evidence-based integrative medicine, 23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment in Surgical Care: Short Review of Research Publications in Osteopathic Journals During the Period 1990 to 2017
2018 (English)In: Journal of evidence-based integrative medicine, ISSN 2515-690X, Vol. 23Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A growing trend in surgical care is the investigation and incorporation of multimodal interventions into standardized programs. Additionally, manual therapies such as osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) are being used with patients in surgical care. Yet the scientific dialogue and the use of OMT in surgical care are currently insubstantial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
integrative medicine; manipulation; osteopathic; surgery
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152522 (URN)10.1177/2515690X18767671 (DOI)29637792 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-07
Magidy, M., Warren-Stomberg, M. & Bjerså, K. (2016). Assessment of post-operative pain management among acutely and electively admitted patients - a Swedish ward perspective. Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, 22(2), 283-289
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of post-operative pain management among acutely and electively admitted patients - a Swedish ward perspective
2016 (English)In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 283-289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rationale, aims and objectivesSwedish health care is regulated to involve the patient in every intervention process. In the area of post-operative pain, it is therefore important to evaluate patient experience of the quality of pain management. Previous research has focused on mapping this area but not on comparing experiences between acutely and electively admitted patients. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of post-operative pain management quality among acutely and electively admitted patients at a Swedish surgical department performing soft-tissue surgery. MethodsA survey study design was used as a method based on a multidimensional instrument to assess post-operative pain management: Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP). Consecutive patients at all wards of a university hospitals surgical department were included. Data collection was performed at hospital discharge. ResultsIn total, 160 patients participated, of whom 40 patients were acutely admitted. A significant difference between acutely and electively admitted patients was observed in the SCQIPP area of environment, whereas acute patients rated the post-operative pain management quality lower compared with those who were electively admitted. ConclusionsThere may be a need for improvement in the areas of post-operative pain management in Sweden, both specifically and generally. There may also be a difference in the experience of post-operative pain quality between acutely and electively admitted patients in this study, specifically in the area of environment. In addition, low levels of the perceived quality of post-operative pain management among the patients were consistent, but satisfaction with analgesic treatment was rated as good.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
Keywords
pain; post-operative; quality indicator; surgery
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127424 (URN)10.1111/jep.12475 (DOI)000373135400019 ()26507572 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-01 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Avander, K., Heikki, A., Bjerså, K. & Engstrom, M. (2016). Trauma Nurses Experience of Workplace Violence and Threats: Short- and Long-Term Consequences in a Swedish Setting. JOURNAL OF TRAUMA NURSING, 23(2), 51-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma Nurses Experience of Workplace Violence and Threats: Short- and Long-Term Consequences in a Swedish Setting
2016 (English)In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA NURSING, ISSN 1078-7496, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Violence in health care is increasing globally and Sweden is no exception. Still, this topic is sparsely studied in the Swedish trauma care setting. This focus group study examined nurses experience of violence and threats, and their consequences. The content analysis revealed two main categories, threatening situations and consequences, which led to a change in priorities in nursing care in order to avoid a potential violent situation. Furthermore, negative stress among the staff and greater vigilance and unwillingness to be near the patient resulted in altered communication and, in the end, a decreased quality of nursing care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2016
Keywords
Workplace violence; Nurses experiences; Trauma care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127448 (URN)10.1097/JTN.0000000000000186 (DOI)000372936600003 ()26953531 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-01 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2016-05-09
Bjerså, K., Jildenstaal, P., Jakobsson, J., Egardt, M. & Fagevik Olsen, M. (2015). Adjunct High Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Stimulation (TENS) for Postoperative Pain Management during Weaning from Epidural Analgesia Following Colon Surgery: Results from a Controlled Pilot Study. Pain Management Nursing, 16(6), 944-950
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adjunct High Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Stimulation (TENS) for Postoperative Pain Management during Weaning from Epidural Analgesia Following Colon Surgery: Results from a Controlled Pilot Study
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Pain Management Nursing, ISSN 1524-9042, E-ISSN 1532-8635, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 944-950Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The potential benefit of nonpharmacological adjunctive therapy is not well-studied following major abdominal surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a complementary nonpharmacological analgesia intervention during weaning from epidural analgesia (EDA) after open lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomized to TENS and sham TENS during weaning from EDA. The effects on pain at rest, following short walk, and after deep breath were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) grading. Number of patients assessed was lower than calculated because of change in clinical routine. Pain scores overall were low. A trend of lower pain scores was observed in the active TENS group of patients; a statistical significance between the groups was found for the pain lying prone in bed (p < .05). This controlled pilot study indicates benefits of TENS use in postoperative pain management during weaning from EDA after open colon surgery. Further studies are warranted in order to verify the potential beneficial effects from TENS during weaning from EDA after open, lower abdominal surgery. (C) 2015 by the American Society for Pain Management Nursing

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124506 (URN)10.1016/j.pmn.2015.08.006 (DOI)000367564900015 ()26541070 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Markström, I. & Bjerså, K. (2015). Diversities in perceived knowledge and practice of preoperative skin preparation in Swedish orthopaedic surgery. Journal of perioperative practice, 25(5), 101-106, Article ID 26292463.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversities in perceived knowledge and practice of preoperative skin preparation in Swedish orthopaedic surgery
2015 (English)In: Journal of perioperative practice, ISSN 1750-4589, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 101-106, article id 26292463Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Preoperative skin preparations may reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections. This cross sectional questionnaire study aimed to identify the practice and knowledge of preoperative skin preparation in Swedish orthopaedic surgery departments. One hundred and six respondents (response rate 68%) from 13 Swedish orthopaedic departments reported a diversity of current recommendations and evidence, and good knowledge of skin preparations. This study found variations in practice and deviations from recommendations, despite high levels of knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
Disinfection, Skin preparation, Orthopaedic, Chlorhexidine gluconate, Perioperative nursing
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127375 (URN)10.1177/175045891502500502 (DOI)26292463 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-24 Created: 2016-04-24 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Andersson, T., Bjerså, K., Falk, K. & Olsén, M. F. (2015). Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Research Notes, 8(37), Article ID 25886536.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of chewing gum against postoperative ileus after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a randomized controlled trial
2015 (English)In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 37, article id 25886536Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus is common after surgery. One non-pharmacological intervention that has shown promising results in reducing the duration of postoperative ileus is chewing gum after surgery. However, this has not been investigated in upper gastrointestinal surgery such as pancreatic surgery. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chewing gum treatment on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple due to pancreatic or periampullary cancer.

METHODS: This study was conducted as a phase III trial that was terminated early. Patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumours scheduled for pancreaticoduodenectomy ad modum whipple were included. The treatment group received chewing gum postoperatively and standard care. Controls received glucose solution and standard care. Chewing gum and glucose were used four times a day during the whole hospital stay. Time to first flatus and stool was defined as the primary outcome. The secondary outcome was start with clear liquids, start with liquid diet and length of hospital stay.

RESULTS: No statistically significant differences could be observed between the chewing gum intervention group and the control group. However, a numerical difference in mean time was observed in first flatus, first stool, start of clear fluids, and start of liquid diet and length of hospital stay in favour of the intervention group.

CONCLUSIONS: Although this study did not find statistically significant differences favouring the use of chewing gum for postoperative ileus, a positive trend was observed of a reduction of the impact of postoperative ileus among patients after pancreatic surgery. It also contributes valuable methodological experience that is important for future studies of chewing gum interventions during recovery after pancreatic surgery.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02319512 , publication date 2014-12-17.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127376 (URN)10.1186/s13104-015-0996-0 (DOI)25886536 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-24 Created: 2016-04-24 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Bjerså, K., Biorserud, C. & Fagevik Olsen, M. (2015). Therapeutic ultrasound treatment for excessive skin on the upper arms due to extensive weight loss after bariatric surgery: A single blind, randomised, controlled trial. Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, 49(6), 353-357
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Therapeutic ultrasound treatment for excessive skin on the upper arms due to extensive weight loss after bariatric surgery: A single blind, randomised, controlled trial
2015 (English)In: Journal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, ISSN 2000-656X, E-ISSN 2000-6764, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 353-357Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Excessive skin is a side-effect of massive weight loss. The only evidence-based treatment for excessive skin is plastic surgery. Non-invasive treatments, therefore, need to be evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of therapeutic ultrasound treatment on excess skin on the upper arms after bariatric surgery. Method: Fourteen patients were randomised to receive five treatments, each lasting for 30 minutes with active ultrasound treatment by CellsonicTM (Cellsonic Ltd) on one arm. The other arm served as control. The effect was evaluated objectively by measuring arm volume, circumference, and ptosis, and subjectively by a questionnaire where the patients assessed the effect of the treatment and amount and/or discomfort of the excess skin. Result: No statistical differences were observed in the objectively measured variables. Some patients reported perceived effects and a majority reported positive experiences of the treatment. No side-effects were reported. Conclusion: This study could not find any objectively measured effect of ultrasound treatment on excessive skin after bariatric surgery. However, participants experienced relief of symptoms associated with excess skin, such as pain, looseness, and decreased skin burst, which indicates that ultrasonic treatment of patients with excessive skin should be further investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR and FRANCIS LTD, 2015
Keywords
Excess skin; ultrasound; weight loss
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123141 (URN)10.3109/2000656X.2015.1058270 (DOI)000364409400007 ()26155952 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Bjerså, K. & Andersson, T. (2014). High frequency TENS as a complement for pain relief in postoperative transition from epidural to general analgesia after pancreatic resection. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 20(1), 5-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High frequency TENS as a complement for pain relief in postoperative transition from epidural to general analgesia after pancreatic resection
2014 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 5-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study investigated the effect of high frequency transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) as a pain relieving complementary therapy at the transition from epidural (EDA) to general analgesia after pancreatic surgery by horizontal, abdominal incision. Method: Fifty-five consecutive patients undergoing pancreatic resection were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to active or sham TENS treatment. Twenty subjects were included in the analysis. Pain, quality of recovery and additional analgesia consumption were measured during the 24hof transition from EDA to general analgesia. Results: Additional analgesic consumption and pain estimations at 24hafter EDA termination differed between the two groups, but was not statistically significant. Conclusion: This study did not find support to reject use of high frequency TENS as complement during transition from EDA to general analgesia after major abdominal surgery with horizontal incision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Complementary therapies; Epidural analgesia; Pancreaticoduodenectomy; Postoperative pain; Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110531 (URN)10.1016/j.ctcp.2013.11.004 (DOI)24439637 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892507981 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-09-14 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Bjerså, K., Sachs, C., Hyltander, A. & Fagevik Olsén, M. (2013). Osteopathic intervention for chronic pain, remaining thoracic stiffness and breathing impairment after thoracoabdominal oesophagus resection: A single subject design study. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(2), 68-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Osteopathic intervention for chronic pain, remaining thoracic stiffness and breathing impairment after thoracoabdominal oesophagus resection: A single subject design study
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, ISSN 1746-0689, E-ISSN 1878-0164, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 68-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Thoracic surgery can cause negative effects such as chronic pain, impaired thorax movement and/or impaired breathing. There are indications that manual therapies, such as osteopathy, may be beneficial for these conditions.

Objective

To investigate effects of osteopathic intervention on chronic pain and remaining limitations to thoracic range of motion and breathing in patients who had undergone thoracoabdominal resection of the oesophagus.

Design

In a single-subject research design (Aa-B-Ab), 8 participants with chronic postoperative thoracic pain, stiffness and/or breathing impairment after standardized oesophagus resection were given 10 sessions of osteopathic treatment of 45 min. Expiratory vital capacity, thorax mobility, pain experience, and subjective perception of treatment were measured on three occasions during each phase. The two-standard deviation band method was used to indicate significant change.

Results

A significantly increased range of motion in the thorax was observed in thoracic excursion and in lateral flexion. A positive change in pain was also noted. The results in expiratory vital capacity were contradictory. The participants were generally positive toward the treatment given.

Conclusion

Osteopathic intervention may affect thoracic impairment and pain among people with chronic pain and impaired thoracic range of motion after thoracoabdominal resection of the oesophagus

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Osteopathic manipulative treatment; Thoracotomy; Postoperative pain; Range of motion; Dyspnoea
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127378 (URN)10.1016/j.ijosm.2012.10.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-04-24 Created: 2016-04-24 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8500-2245

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