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Eldh, Ann Catrine, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7737-169X
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Åsberg, K., Eldh, A. C., Löf, M. & Bendtsen, M. (2022). A balancing act–finding one´s way to health and well-being: A qualitative analysis of interviews with Swedish university students on lifestyle and behavior change. PLOS ONE, 17(10), Article ID e0275848.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A balancing act–finding one´s way to health and well-being: A qualitative analysis of interviews with Swedish university students on lifestyle and behavior change
2022 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 10, article id e0275848Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors such as unhealthy diets, low physical activity levels, smoking, and harmful alcohol consumption are common in student populations, which constitute a large group of young adults. As unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are associated with future disease and premature mortality, most commonly from cardiovascular disease and cancers, it is from a public health perspective important to understand such behaviors in young adult populations. The objective of this study was to investigate university students experiences of health, health-related behaviors, and the barriers and facilitators for behavior change in terms of health promotion in everyday life. Materials and methods This qualitative study was conducted at a middle-sized university in Sweden. Students represented different faculties and were recruited via non-probability convenience sampling using means such as the snowball technique and social media. The 21 interviews with 24 students, individually or in groups, were transcribed verbatim prior to a qualitative analysis inspired by phenomenological hermeneutics. Results Our interviews showed that university student life is associated with new health-related challenges, for example study-related stress and procrastination implies a lack of energy to engage in healthy routines such as physical activity, and a limited budget affects food choices. While adapting to a new context, students explore personal strategies such as taking on changes in manageable steps, seeking social support, and avoiding disturbances to maintaining health and quality of life. Conclusions Experiences of health while becoming and being a university student can be described as a transition-a balancing act of walking a slack line-during which students seek to manage a healthy balance. In the past, interventions have to some extent been designed to address university students behaviors; however, our study aids an understanding of their needs. Future interventions should highlight the transitions they are experiencing and the challenges of student life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2022
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-191920 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0275848 (DOI)000924819300066 ()36227904 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, Grant number 2018-01410
Note

Funding: Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare [2018-01410]

Available from: 2023-02-23 Created: 2023-02-23 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Svenzén, E. & Eldh, A. C. (2022). Digital communication in primary care: A qualitative descriptive study of patient interviews considering person-centred care. Nordic Journal of Nursing Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital communication in primary care: A qualitative descriptive study of patient interviews considering person-centred care
2022 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Nursing Research, ISSN 2057-1585Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

With the growing demand for primary care, provision needs to be efficient, yet retain person-centred and integrated care. Digital communication is suggested as a way to settle these aspects, although there is insufficient knowledge regarding the end-user's perspective. The aim of this study was to describe patients’ experiences of digital communication in their primary care contact, while considering aspects of person-centred care. A purposeful sample of 16 patients (aged 28–85 years) was interviewed via telephone in a qualitative design, and verbatim transcripts were analysed using inductive thematic analysis and a subsequent deductive approach in relation to a person-centred care framework. The study was reported following the COREQ guidelines. The findings indicate that, from a patient perspective, digital communication enables independent contact where one crafts one's medical history at a time and place convenient for oneself, providing opportunities for the primary care triage to consider one's individual input. These aspects of digital communication serve person-centredness, although they were less suitable for certain health issues, but a human interaction was most appropriate when health concerns were ambiguous or complex. Thus, digital communication may serve patients in primary care, but the development and implementation of such services must move beyond technical and professional perspectives. In order to facilitate integrated care, further emphasis is needed on both patients’ experiences, and the principles of person-centred care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-192417 (URN)10.1177/20571585221100945 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-03-16 Created: 2023-03-16 Last updated: 2023-04-28
Eldh, A. C., Seers, K. & Rycroft-Malone, J. (2020). Realist evaluation. In: Per Nilsen, Sarah A. Birken (Ed.), Handbook on implementation science: (pp. 505-511). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, Sidorna 505-511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Realist evaluation
2020 (English)In: Handbook on implementation science / [ed] Per Nilsen, Sarah A. Birken, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020, Vol. Sidorna 505-511, p. 505-511Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-177221 (URN)9781788975988 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-06-23 Created: 2021-06-23 Last updated: 2021-07-01Bibliographically approved
Luhr, K., Eldh, A. C., Theander, K. & Holmefur, M. (2019). Effects of a self-management programme on patient participation in patients with chronic heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized controlled trial. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 18(3), 185-193
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a self-management programme on patient participation in patients with chronic heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized controlled trial
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 185-193Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Self-management strategies are crucial to patients with long-term conditions and can presumably promote patient participation, given that to patients, patient participation connotes opportunities for self-care (along with being engaged in an exchange of knowledge, a phrasing of joint goals and planning of care). So far, limited attention has been given to what components support self-management and what outcomes can be achieved. An exclusive self-management programme in primary healthcare entailed assessing its influence on patient participation.

Aim:

To describe the effects of a self-management programme on preferences for, and experiences of, patient participation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic heart failure.

Methods:

A randomized controlled trial with a six session intervention programme, including phrasing of individual action plans and group discussions on the patients’ issues. The intervention group (n=59) received standard care and the self-management programme, and the control group (n=59) received standard care only. Data was collected at baseline and at three months and 12 months after the intervention started, using the Patient Preferences for Patient Participation (the 4Ps) measure.

Results:

No significant differences were found within the groups, or between the groups, in preferences and experiences of patient participation, either in summary score or at an item level.

Conclusion:

A self-management group programme led by trained primary healthcare staff in primary care did not serve as means to influence patients’ experience of patient participation in the care of their long-term condition. Further studies are needed in regard to what facilitates patient participation in this setting and beyond.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure, long-term conditions, patient participation, primary healthcare, self-management programme
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154786 (URN)10.1177/1474515118804126 (DOI)000459871100003 ()30277807 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059539432 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Region Orebro County, Sweden; Uppsala-Orebro Regional Research Council [1300671 SEK]; County Council of Varmland [652069 SEK]

Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Eldh, A. C. (2019). Facilitating patient participation by embracing patients’ preferences: a discussion. Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, 25(6), 1070-1073
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating patient participation by embracing patients’ preferences: a discussion
2019 (English)In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1070-1073Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
patient involvement; patient participation; patient preferences; patient‐centred care; person‐centred care; shared decision‐making
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159951 (URN)10.1111/jep.13126 (DOI)000498506900024 ()30916440 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063455291 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Forskningsradet i Sydostra Sverige [FORSS-751311]

Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Gifford, W., Lewis, K. B., Eldh, A. C., Fiset, V., Abdul-Fatah, T., Aberg, A. C., . . . Wallin, L. (2019). Feasibility and usefulness of a leadership intervention to implement evidence-based falls prevention practices in residential care in Canada. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 5(103), Article ID 31452925.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feasibility and usefulness of a leadership intervention to implement evidence-based falls prevention practices in residential care in Canada
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2019 (English)In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies, E-ISSN 2055-5784, Vol. 5, no 103, article id 31452925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Leadership is critical to supporting and facilitating the implementation of evidence-based practices in health care. Yet, little is known about how to develop leadership capacity for this purpose. The aims of this study were to explore the (1) feasibility of delivering a leadership intervention to promote implementation, (2) usefulness of the leadership intervention, and (3) participants’ engagement in leadership to implement evidence-based fall prevention practices in Canadian residential care.

Methods

We conducted a mixed-method before-and-after feasibility study on two units in a Canadian residential care facility. The leadership intervention was based on the Ottawa model of implementation leadership (O-MILe) and consisted of two workshops and two individualized coaching sessions over 3 months to develop leadership capacity for implementing evidence-based fall prevention practices. Participants (n = 10) included both formal (e.g., managers) and informal (e.g., nurses and care aids leaders). Outcome measures were parameters of feasibility (e.g., number of eligible candidates who attended the workshops and coaching sessions) and usefulness of the leadership intervention (e.g., ratings, suggested modifications). We conducted semi-structured interviews guided by the Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS), a validated measure of 12-item in four subcategories (proactive, supportive, knowledgeable, and perseverant), to explore the leadership behaviors that participants used to implement fall prevention practices. We repeated the ILS in a focus group meeting to understand the collective leadership behaviors used by the intervention team. Barriers and facilitators to leading implementation were also explored.

Results

Delivery of the leadership intervention was feasible. All participants (n = 10) attended the workshops and eight participated in at least one coaching session. Workshops and coaching were rated useful (≥ 3 on a 0–4 Likert scale where 4 = highly useful) by 71% and 86% of participants, respectively. Participants rated the O-MILe subcategories of supportive and perseverant leadership highest for individual leadership, whereas supportive and knowledgeable leadership were rated highest for team leadership.

Conclusions

The leadership intervention was feasible to deliver, deemed useful by participants, and fostered engagement in implementation leadership activities. Study findings highlight the complexity of developing implementation leadership and modifications required to optimize impact. Future trials are now required to test the effectiveness of the leadership intervention on developing leadership for implementing evidence-based practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2019
Keywords
Implementation leadership, Fall prevention, Evidence-based practice, Nursing, Residential care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159952 (URN)10.1186/s40814-019-0485-7 (DOI)000704690200001 ()31452925 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Årestedt, L., Martinsson, C., Hjelm, C., Uhlin, F. & Eldh, A. C. (2019). Patient participation in dialysis care: a qualitative study of patients’ and health professionals’ perspectives. Health Expectations, 22(6), 1285-1293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient participation in dialysis care: a qualitative study of patients’ and health professionals’ perspectives
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2019 (English)In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 1285-1293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159953 (URN)10.1111/hex.12966 (DOI)
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 751-311
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2023-12-28
Eldh, A. C. (Ed.). (2018). Delaktighet och patientmedverkan. Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delaktighet och patientmedverkan
2018 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Boken behandlar det för vård och omsorg centrala begreppet patientdelaktighet. Vidden av begreppet delaktighet gör att det behövs vägledning för vardagens möten och samtal, mellan den som är patient och den som är personal. Boken utgör en resurs och bör ses som en diskussionspartner, med utgångspunkt i aktuell kunskap men även andra förutsättningar, som lagtexter och normer.

Delaktighet och patientmedverkan omfattar två övergripande kapitel som introducerar och problematiserar patientdelaktighet och fyra kapitel som belyser begreppet ur olika, specifika perspektiv. De generella kapitlen kan läsas för sig, eller i kombination med ett eller flera fallbaserade kapitel, utifrån läsarens aktuella kunskapsbehov eller intresse.

Boken vänder sig till blivande och yrkesverksamma inom hälso- och sjukvård eller omsorg men är också avsedd att vara till nytta för andra nyckelpersoner, som beslutsfattare och patienter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018. p. 208
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154782 (URN)9789144113296 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Eldh, A. C. (2018). Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Teasing out clinical interventions and implementation interventions. In: : . Paper presented at The Nordic Implementation Conference, Denmark, 28-30 May, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Teasing out clinical interventions and implementation interventions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154787 (URN)
Conference
The Nordic Implementation Conference, Denmark, 28-30 May, 2018.
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Svensson, C., Alvåsen, K., Eldh, A. C., Frössling, J. & Lomander, H. (2018). Veterinary herd health management: Experience among farmers and farm managers in Swedish dairy production. Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 155, 45-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Veterinary herd health management: Experience among farmers and farm managers in Swedish dairy production
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2018 (English)In: Preventive Veterinary Medicine, ISSN 0167-5877, E-ISSN 1873-1716, Vol. 155, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A preventive herd health approach will most likely reduce incidences of clinical and subclinical disease. Swedish veterinary organizations offer specific veterinary herd health management (HHM) programs, but these services are not used to a large extent.

The aim of this study was to investigate dairy farmers’ experience of HHM and the conditions for collaboration with veterinarians in HHM.

Six focus group discussions were conducted in March 2015 in West Sweden. In total, 33 dairy farmers participated. The recordings were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis, and the transcripts were reviewed to identify potential factors indicating barriers for farmers to engage a veterinarian in HHM. The participants reported HHM to be important, but they had difficulty defining the actions included in the concept. They described a wide range of their work duties as preventive. The farmers’ list of potential contributions by the veterinarians in HHM was strikingly short compared to the considerable number of preventive measures they performed themselves. Four main obstacles for farmers and farm managers to engage a veterinarian in HHM on their farm were identified in the analysis: “costs”, “veterinary knowledge, skills, and organization”, “farmer attitudes”, and “veterinarian-farmer relationships”. Costs were proposed as the main reason against engaging a veterinarian in HHM and included a high veterinary bill, low cost-benefit of veterinary services, and high costs to implement advice. Poor veterinary competence in HHM and poor knowledge about effective measures, practical farming, and farm economics were other important obstacles. Veterinarians were perceived to insufficiently describe their services and their benefits, and several participants felt they had never been offered veterinary HHM. Although veterinary HHM may be initiated by the farmer, the participants expected the veterinarian to have special responsibility for the initiation. A firm trust between farmer, staff, and veterinarian was considered crucial for veterinary HHM, but such trust takes a long time to build and can easily be disrupted by, for example, a veterinarian’s poor communication skills or lack of time.

Our findings suggest that Swedish dairy farmers and herd managers find disease prevention important and that they perform a wide range of tasks to prevent disease in their animals. However, they do not see what role the veterinarian can play, and veterinarians were mainly associated with treating unhealthy cows. In order to increase the use of veterinary HHM programs the services and potential benefits of such programs need to be communicated more proactively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Herd health management, Dairy cattle, Qualitative research, Farmers’ perceptions
National Category
Other Veterinary Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154785 (URN)10.1016/j.prevetmed.2018.04.012 (DOI)29786524 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046349172 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7737-169X

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