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Elmasry, Moustafa
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Abdelrahman, I. M., Steinvall, I., Mossaad, B., Sjöberg, F. & Elmasry, M. (2019). Evaluation of Male Breast Glandular Liposculpturing, Response on Commentary [Letter to the editor]. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 43(2), 548-549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Male Breast Glandular Liposculpturing, Response on Commentary
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2019 (English)In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 548-549Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155912 (URN)10.1007/s00266-018-1295-7 (DOI)000461390200034 ()30564913 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062963423 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Elmasry, M., Mirdell, R., Tesselaar, E., Farnebo, S., Sjöberg, F. & Steinvall, I. (2019). Laser speckle contrast imaging in children with scalds: Its influence on timing of intervention, duration of healing and care, and costs. Burns, 45(4), 798-804
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Laser speckle contrast imaging in children with scalds: Its influence on timing of intervention, duration of healing and care, and costs
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2019 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 798-804Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Background

Scalds are the most common type of burn injury in children, and the initial evaluation of burn depth is a problem. Early identification of deep dermal areas that need excision and grafting would save unnecessary visits and stays in hospital. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) shows promise for the evaluation of this type of burn. The aim of this study was to find out whether perfusion measured with LSCI has an influence on the decision for operation, duration of healing and care period, and costs, in children with scalds.

Methods

We studied a group of children with scalds whose wounds were evaluated with LSCI on day 3–4 after injury during the period 2012–2015. Regression (adjustment for percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), age, and sex) was used to analyse the significance of associations between degree of perfusion and clinical outcome.

Results

We studied 33 children with a mean TBSA% of 6.0 (95% CI 4.4–7.7)%. Lower perfusion values were associated with operation (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve 0.86, 95% CI 0.73–1.00). The perfusion cut-off with 100% specificity for not undergoing an operation was ≥191 PU units (66.7% sensitivity and 72.7% accurately classified). Multivariable analyses showed that perfusion was independently associated with duration of healing and care period.

Conclusion

Lower perfusion values, as measured with LSCI, are associated with longer healing time and longer care period. By earlier identification of burns that will be operated, perfusion measurements may further decrease the duration of care of burns in children with scalds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Laser speckle contrast imaging; Burns; Scalds; Perfusion; Outcome; Children
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154872 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2019.02.001 (DOI)000467914900006 ()30827850 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062153561 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden; Burn Centre, Department of Hand Surgery, Plastic Surgery, and Burns

Available from: 2019-03-02 Created: 2019-03-02 Last updated: 2019-07-01Bibliographically approved
Skog, M., Sivlér, P., Steinvall, I., Aili, D., Sjöberg, F. & Elmasry, M. (2019). The Effect of Enzymatic Digestion on Cultured Epithelial Autografts. Cell Transplantation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Enzymatic Digestion on Cultured Epithelial Autografts
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2019 (English)In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Severe burns are often treated by means of autologous skin grafts, preferably following early excision of the burnt tissue. In the case of, for example, a large surface trauma, autologous skin cells can be expanded in vitro prior to transplantation to facilitate the treatment when insufficient uninjured skin is a limitation. In this study we have analyzed the impact of the enzyme (trypsin or accutase) used for cell dissociation and the incubation time on cell viability and expansion potential, as well as expression of cell surface markers indicative of stemness. Skin was collected from five individuals undergoing abdominal reduction surgery and the epidermal compartment was digested in either trypsin or accutase. Trypsin generally generated more cells than accutase and with higher viability; however, after 7 days of subsequent culture, accutase-digested samples tended to have a higher cell count than trypsin, although the differences were not significant. No significant difference was found between the enzymes in median fluorescence intensity of the analyzed stem cell markers; however, accutase digestion generated significantly higher levels of CD117- and CD49f-positive cells, but only in the 5 h digestion group. In conclusion, digestion time appeared to affect the isolated cells more than the choice of enzyme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
autografts, cell culture, epithelial cells, keratinocytes, stem cells
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156422 (URN)10.1177/0963689719833305 (DOI)30983404 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-04-23
Abdelrahman, I., Steinvall, I., Fredrikson, M., Sjöberg, F. & Elmasry, M. (2019). Use of the burn intervention score to calculate the charges of the care of burns. Burns, 45(2), 303-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of the burn intervention score to calculate the charges of the care of burns
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2019 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background To our knowledge this is the first published estimate of the charges of the care of burns in Sweden. The Linköping Burn Interventional Score has been used to calculate the charges for each burned patient since 1993. The treatment of burns is versatile, and depends on the depth and extension of the burn. This requires a flexible system to detect the actual differences in the care provided. We aimed to describe the model of burn care that we used to calculate the charges incurred during the acute phase until discharge, so it could be reproduced and applied in other burn centres, which would facilitate a future objective comparison of the expenses in burn care. Methods All patients admitted with burns during the period 2010–15 were included. We analysed clinical and economic data from the daily burn scores during the acute phase of the burn until discharge from the burn centre. Results Total median charge/patient was US$ 28 199 (10th–90th centiles 4668-197 781) for 696 patients admitted. Burns caused by hot objects and electricity resulted in the highest charges/TBSA%, while charges/day were similar for the different causes of injury. Flame burns resulted in the highest mean charges/admission, probably because they had the longest duration of stay. Mean charges/patient increased in a linear fashion among the different age groups. Conclusion Our intervention-based estimate of charges has proved to be a valid tool that is sensitive to the procedures that drive the costs of the care of burns such as large TBSA%, intensive care, and operations. The burn score system could be reproduced easily in other burn centres worldwide and facilitate the comparison regardless of the differences in the currency and the economic circumstances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Burns;Charges;Intervention score;Costs;Payments
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153636 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2018.12.007 (DOI)000461044900004 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Department of Hand Surgery, Plastic Surgery, and Burns; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2019-01-06 Created: 2019-01-06 Last updated: 2019-04-01
Pompermaier, L., Elmasry, M., Abdelrahman, I., Fredrikson, M., Sjöberg, F. & Steinvall, I. (2018). Are there any differences in the provided burn care between men and women? A retrospective study. Burns & Trauma, 6, Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are there any differences in the provided burn care between men and women? A retrospective study
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2018 (English)In: Burns & Trauma, E-ISSN 2321-3876, Vol. 6, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Disparity between medical treatment for men and women has been recorded worldwide. However, it is difficult to find out if the disparities in both the use of resources and outcome depend entirely on sex-related discrimination. Our aim was to investigate if there are differences in burn treatments between the sexes.

Methods

All patients admitted with burns to Linköping University Hospital during the 16-year period 2000–2015 were included. Interventions were prospectively recorded using the validated Burn SCoring system (BSC). Data were analysed using a multivariable panel regression model adjusted for age, percentage total body surface area (%TBSA), and in-hospital mortality.

Results

A total of 1363 patients were included, who generated a total of 22,301 daily recordings while they were inpatients. Males were 70% (930/1363). Sex was not an independent factor for daily scores after adjustment for age, %TBSA, and mortality in hospital (model R2=0.60, p < 0.001).

Conclusion

We found no evidence of inequity between the sexes in treatments given in our burn centre when we had adjusted for size of burn, age, and mortality. BSC seems to be an appropriate model in which to evaluate sex-related differences in the delivery of treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Burn care; Intervention score; Sex; Trauma model; Workload
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150365 (URN)10.1186/s41038-018-0125-0 (DOI)000442159400001 ()30123802 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
Zötterman, J., Steinvall, I. & Elmasry, M. (2018). Better Protection of Glass-Fronted Stoves Is Needed in Sweden Because of the Increase in the Number of Contact Burns Among Small Children. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 39(4), 618-622
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Better Protection of Glass-Fronted Stoves Is Needed in Sweden Because of the Increase in the Number of Contact Burns Among Small Children
2018 (English)In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 618-622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The impression among the attending physicians at their Burn Centre is that the number of contact burns caused by glass-fronted stoves is increasing, particularly in the youngest group of patients. It is an interesting subgroup, as these injuries are preventable. The authors’ aim of this study was to find out whether the incidence of burns after contact with glass-fronted stoves has increased.

The authors included all patients aged between 0 and 3.9 years who presented to the National Burn Centre during the period 2008–2015 with contact burn injuries caused by glass-fronted stoves. The change in incidence over time was calculated from national records and analyzed with simple linear regression.

Fifty-six patients were included, of whom 20 were treated during the past 2 years of the study. Thirty-seven of the 56 were boys (66%), median (10–90 percentiles) age was 1.1 (0.7–2.5) years, percentage total body surface area burned was 0.6% (0.1–2.0), 12 were admitted for overnight stay in hospital, and seven needed operations. The incidence was 0.34/100 000 children-years during the first 2 years, and it was three times as high during the past 2 years. The increase in incidence was 0.24/100 000 children-years by each 2-year period (P = .02).

The authors’ results indicate that contact burns among children caused by glass-fronted stoves are increasing in Sweden. The authors propose that there should be a plan for their prevention put in place.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148623 (URN)10.1093/jbcr/irx037 (DOI)000436400700020 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Burn Centre, Department of Hand Surgery, Plastic Surgery, and Burns; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2018-06-15 Created: 2018-06-15 Last updated: 2018-07-23
Pompermaier, L., Steinvall, I., Elmasry, M., Thorfinn, J. & Sjöberg, F. (2018). Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study. Burns, 44(2), 280-287
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study
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2018 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Baux score, Burns, Cause of death, Mortality
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142898 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2017.07.014 (DOI)000427535000006 ()28830698 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027674409 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Burn Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery, and Burns, Region Ostergotland; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Steinvall, I., Karlsson, M. & Elmasry, M. (2018). C-reactive protein response patterns after antibiotic treatment among children with scalds. Burns, 44, 718-723
Open this publication in new window or tab >>C-reactive protein response patterns after antibiotic treatment among children with scalds
2018 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, p. 718-723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Scalds are the most common cause of burns in children, yet there is little information available about the inflammatory response. The aim of the study was to investigate the response to treatment with antibiotics among scalded children by following the C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, procalcitonin (PCT) concentration, and white blood cell count (WCC) during the first two weeks after injury.

Methods

All children with scalds who presented to the Burn Centre during 2010–2016 were included in this retrospective study. All measurements of CRP, PCT, and WCC from the first 14 days after injury were recorded, and each patient’s maximum values during days 0–2, 3–7, and 8–14 were used for calculations. Multivariable regression for panel data was used to study the inflammatory response after antibiotic treatment.

Results

A total of 216 children were included. C-reactive protein was 45 mg/L (p < 0.001) higher in the group treated with antibiotics, and decreased with 8.8 mg/L per day over the studied time in this group, which was more than twice as fast as among the children who were not given antibiotics.

Conclusion

The CRP response, among children with minor scalds treated with antibiotics, shows an appreciable rise during the first week of injury that subsided rapidly during the second week.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pergamon Press, 2018
Keywords
Burns, C-reactive protein, Inflammatory response, Procalcitonin, White blood cell count, Antibiotics
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147069 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2017.10.023 (DOI)000430054700029 ()29571718 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044143191 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Department of Hand Surgery, Plastic Surgery, and Burns; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Abdelrahman, I., Steinvall, I., Mossaad, B., Sjöberg, F. & Elmasry, M. (2018). Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 42(2), 1222-1230
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia
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2018 (English)In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

Methods

We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

Results

The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

Conclusions

Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Gynaecomastia, Liposculpture, Liposuction, Patient satisfaction
National Category
Surgery Gastroenterology and Hepatology Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146046 (URN)10.1007/s00266-018-1118-x (DOI)000445156900007 ()29549405 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
Aboelnaga, A., Elmasry, M., Adly, O. A., Elbadawy, M. A., Abbas, A. H., Abdelrahman, I., . . . Steinvall, I. (2018). Microbial cellulose dressing compared with silver sulphadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burns: A prospective, randomised, clinical trial. Burns, 44(8), 1982-1988
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial cellulose dressing compared with silver sulphadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burns: A prospective, randomised, clinical trial
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2018 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1982-1988Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The current treatment for partial thickness burns at the trial site is silver sulphadiazine, as it minimises bacterial colonisation of wounds. Its deleterious effect on wound healing, together with the need for repeated, often painful, procedures, has brought about the search for a better treatment. Microbial cellulose has shown promising results that avoid these disadvantages. The aim of this study was therefore to compare microbial cellulose with silver sulphadiazine as a dressing for partial thickness burns.

Method

All patients who presented with partial thickness (superficial and deep dermal) burns from October 2014 to October 2016 were screened for this randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients were included in each group: the cellulose group was treated with microbial cellulose sheets and the control group with silver sulphadiazine cream 10 mg/g. The wound was evaluated every third day. Pain was assessed using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale during and after each procedure. Other variables recorded were age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), clinical signs of infection, time for epithelialisation and hospital stay. Linear multivariable regression was used to analyse the significance of differences between the treatment groups by adjusting for the size and depth of the burn, and the patient’s age.

Results

Median TBSA% was 9% (IQR 5.5–12.5). The median number of dressing changes was 1 (IQR 1–2) in the cellulose group, which was lower than that in the control group (median 9.5, IQR 6–16) (p < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with microbial cellulose spent 6.3 (95% CI 0.2–12.5) fewer days in hospital (p = 0.04), had a mean score that was 3.4 (95% CI 2.5–4.3) points lower during wound care (p < 0.001), and 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–2.7) afterwards (p < 0.001). Epithelialisation was quicker, but not significantly so.

Conclusion

These results suggest that the microbial cellulose dressing is a better first choice for treatment of partial thickness burns than silver sulphadiazine cream. Fewer dressings of the wound were done and, combined with the low pain scores, this is good for both the patients and the health care system. The differences in randomisation of the area of burns is, however, a concern that needs to be included in the interpretation of the results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150103 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2018.06.007 (DOI)000451331200015 ()30005989 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt

Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13
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